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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    Apologies for my late reply as I don't get much time in A&E.

    1. There is a growing demand for private primary care work. This includes things like vaccines but also a growing number of GPs are going into minor procedures, company representation and cosmetics (ie. botox). Additionally, a lot of primary care physicians are involved in litigation claims and medical reviews for insurance companies. Any licensed practitioner can technically do the above, but having the time and flexibility is virtually unique to GPs.

    2. Absolutely. There is a shortage of primary care physicians worldwide. Coupled with a shorter training path this means you are able to apply for positions much more easily abroad. It's well known that getting a job in the USA or Canada is difficult, for example. Apply as a fully qualified GP with the necessary requirements and some flexibility in terms of where you work initially, you could be looking at a lucrative job with better benefits, weather and lifestyle.
    Thanks. Any idea where I can read up on more of the stuff you detailed in 1? This site is the only real place I go, and the BMA stuff isn't so useful when it comes to 'business'/business side of doctoring, given most won't get involved in it at all.

    About 2 - Fair point, though AFAIK the USA involves even more tests and it's still hard. I guess Aus/NZ are the more traditional escape routes.
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    (Original post by PoolR)
    Thanks. Any idea where I can read up on more of the stuff you detailed in 1? This site is the only real place I go, and the BMA stuff isn't so useful when it comes to 'business'/business side of doctoring, given most won't get involved in it at all.

    About 2 - Fair point, though AFAIK the USA involves even more tests and it's still hard. I guess Aus/NZ are the more traditional escape routes.
    Unfortunately I don't, no. I have found most of these 'buisiness' side of things out by networking and through experience.
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    (Original post by Kyalimers)
    Unfortunately I don't, no. I have found most of these 'buisiness' side of things out by networking and through experience.
    Hey,

    That's fine, thanks for replying anyway. It's just quite difficult to find out about stuff like this, as I mentioned before the only 'sources' are those offering training, and they're naturally biased.
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    (Original post by Elles)
    To try to answer the original Q about why people might want to go into it.

    - Clinical variety
    My favourite specialties were Psych, O&G & Paeds - there is plenty of all of this in GP!
    Also the diagnostic challenges of often being the first person to see undifferentiated symptoms & not do bloods/imaging on everyone as a default...

    - Holistic approach & age/sex range of patients
    GPs are expert generalists - hospital medicine is increasingly subspecialized and in danger of losing focus of the bigger picture or patients rather than diseases - although geriatrics & paeds probably maintain some of this but have quite limited patients!

    - Continuity/community
    Enjoying building up a relationship over years with patients & really getting to know them in context - sometimes things click into place when you meet a parent/spouse etc.!

    - Environment
    Not working in a hospital!

    - Opportunities
    Scope for out of hours, urgent care/walk in, prehospital care, teaching, management, ccg stuff, procedures or developing a specialist interest etc.
    Work that can be defined in sessions especially when locuming or salaried so working part time is easy & almost the norm as people tend to do other things too - so the work life balance can be good.
    'Full-time' is often 8-9 sessions (half days) these days though which does reflect the intensity.
    In your last point you talk about 8-9 sessions - can you elaborate on that please. 8am - 9pm?
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    GP surgeries are open normal hours in Scotland 8-6. Anything else is extended hours.
    A day is divided in to 2 sessions, for instance tomorrow I just work 1 session in the morning. Although the practice is open from 8 I don't usually arrive until 8.30-9 (our non extended hours surgeries start at 9, we used to start at 8.30 but decided that as the middle of our day was filling up we'd be nice to ourselves by not starting as early). We aren't an emergency service so if something can't wait half an hour it needs a 999 ambulance anyway. I'm usually out of the building by 1.
    In the afternoons if not on call I leave between 5.30 and 6, if on call I hang around until 6 and may have a visit to do on the way home.
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    I want to be a GP..
    Just graduated from medical school.
    I need to self study and going to work as a GP in a couple of months.
    Am currently doing my internship year.

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