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    (Original post by Bradley99)
    I got 64 bytes for the image
    It was a networking card i think and by using SSID whitelisting.
    And floating gate transistor / NAND flash memory chips.
    Yep I got 64 bytes as well
    I put Mac address whitelisting instead
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    I put NAND memory chips and floating gate transistor for the components of an SSD
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    What did people say for the 6 marker on RFID, barcode reader and digital camera?
    What did people say for the reason to have a hdd as a second hard drive aswell?

    What do people think the grade boundaries will be like?
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    (Original post by Moogoescow)
    If odd then it would run both your odd and even store code leaving an incorrect value.
    I was worried about that - how did you do it? Two HALT statements?

    (Original post by Bradley99)
    What did people say for the 6 marker on RFID, barcode reader and digital camera?
    Barcode readers are very short range so someone would have to scan them by hand, slowing down runners and requiring a lot of volunteers. Digital cameras could recognise an image (e.g. QR code) on a runner's shirt but wouldn't be very accurate as people would facing in different directions and there might be folds in the shirt. RFID readers can be placed in a mat at the checkpoint and each runner can be given an RFID tag to put in their shoes.
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    (Original post by Bradley99)
    Haha I got B on the boolean algebra question
    I got B aswell
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    The assembly language question was such a troll. It said the 1 bit is at the end of odd numbers, and a 0 bit at the end of even numbers. The end of a number is on the far right, although the diagram showed the numbers 0 to 7 from right to left, so one could have assumed that the last bit was the leftmost bit!! I know the answer was #1 (I put #128), just feel so trolled right now.

    Question:
    For the assembly language question, I used #128 again, and I used the "Branch if less than" (since I assumed off numbers would the be equal to 128 after the AND comparison, and even numbers less- by my failed comparison, when it should've been #1), and I did all of the storing and labelling right. So how many marks would I get?
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    The assembly language took some thinking.

    I put floating gate transistors and a controller. Not sure if the controller is right tbh.

    Programming was definitely easier.
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    For the SSD I put the school may have whitelisted MAC addresses which only let some recognised one connect. Also For he next part performance of the network increase I put less traffic going around the network. I also got 64 bytes for that question
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    do you think ill get marked down if I put blacklisting instead of whitelisting?
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    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    do you think ill get marked down if I put blacklisting instead of whitelisting?
    Well the problem with a blacklist is that you will have to list all devices that aren't allowed on the network, which could go on forever
    A whitelist lists the devices that are allowed on the network so the list is very small/finite

    I reckon the exam board will allow both to be honest seeing they know what you are talking about
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    (Original post by CrazyFool229)
    Well the problem with a blacklist is that you will have to list all devices that aren't allowed on the network, which could go on forever
    A whitelist lists the devices that are allowed on the network so the list is very small/finite

    I reckon the exam board will allow both to be honest seeing they know what you are talking about
    Yeah I explained blacklisting, that's the only thing in my book lol
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    For the 6 marker on increasing the performance of a processor I put: increased cache size; support 64 bit operation and increased # of instruction sets (this one is a bit far fetched but there are some examples, such as the introduction of AES-NI, that boost the performance of AES operations thus the overall speed)... do you guys think they will allow such answers?
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    (Original post by Lord_Commander)
    For the 6 marker on increasing the performance of a processor I put: increased cache size; support 64 bit operation and increased # of instruction sets (this one is a bit far fetched but there are some examples, such as the introduction of AES-NI, that boost the performance of AES operations thus the overall speed)... do you guys think they will allow such answers?
    To be honest the examiner will most likely know what you are talking about and the exam board will allow some non-conventional answers especially by own knowledge, so probably.
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    Predictions on grade boundaries?
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    Anyone remember the boolean equation? (4 Marks)
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    (Original post by Bradley99)
    What did people say for the 6 marker on RFID, barcode reader and digital camera?
    What did people say for the reason to have a hdd as a second hard drive aswell?

    What do people think the grade boundaries will be like?
    I roughly defined RFID, Barcode Reader and digital camera, applying them to the context of the question (Marathon). I then explained why a Bar-code reader and digital camera wouldn't be optimal.

    Some of my points were:
    Bar-code reader:
    Limited Range, Light refraction could be irregular, especially dependant on weather conditions, May not compensate for movement, especially during the competition.
    Digital Camera:
    Once again, limited range (QR Code), may not be reliable if the camera is low quality, would require active volunteers to interpret and utilise the camera; which may not be viable.
    RFID:
    RFID tags (Active/passive) could be uniquely created for each competitor, allowing for near-instant differentiation. Emitted radio waves would be easy to pick up, especially on higher frequencies.
    (Put a few more, but I cannot currently remember them, however it was for 6 marks so 2 points per device?)

    (Original post by OturuDansay)
    do you think ill get marked down if I put blacklisting instead of whitelisting?
    It would be harsh if they penalised you for that, considering the fact that device black-listing is the inverse of device white-listing. It wouldn't however be optimal; but is still a way to restrict users. As long as you've justified your reasoning by explaining what it is and how it applies to the context of a (school network was it?).

    (Original post by CrazyFool229)
    I put floating gate transistors and a controller. Not sure if the controller is right tbh.
    I would think that "NAND flash memory cells", "Floating Gate Transistors" and "Flash Controller" would be valid, these are off the top of my head though.

    (Original post by lilyjacks)
    I got B aswell
    I also got B for the simplification question.
    I cancelled out the NOT functions which left NOT(A) in the right side, expanded the brackets leaving a trail of A's and B's with OR,AND functions.
    If I remember correctly, I got NOT(A) AND B OR B AND A, I rearranged this using De Morgan's laws to B AND NOT(A) OR A AND B.
    NOT(A) OR A is 0, so that left B OR B.
    B OR B = B

    -------------
    For the processor improvement question, I stated increasing bus width, increasing clock speed and increasing cache memory. Hopefully somebody can confirm the validity of those answers? Of course they came attached with justifications in terms of a processor's performance.
    -------------
    Did we get something like 0,0,0 and 0,1,1 for the massive logic circuit? (Caught me by surprise due to the complexity of it, but it's just XOR gates)
    ---------------
    For the Imperative Programming vs Low Level Language question at the back, what did we get for the advantages and disadvantages for Imperative programming>?
    FYI: Imperative programming is the use of statements in order to change the program's state for the question above it.
    ---------------
    I thought that the exam we did was difficult in terms of it's Boolean Algebra and Machine/Assembly Language questions, however everything else wasn't out of the ordinary. Surprised that they completely avoided legal,social,ethical,moral questions, which is a large part of the specification. They also cut out the fetch-execute cycle, and a lot of the registers; with the only register question being a simple 1/2 mark definition?

    I'm hoping that grade boundaries are in a radius of 70% - A 60% - B 50% - C, but there were a load of filler questions that could ultimately raise the boundaries.

    Hope everybody did their best in that exam, was pretty rough in certain areas (1/3-1/2 way through)
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    (Original post by TehBrillfighter)
    I also got B for the simplification question.
    I cancelled out the NOT functions which left NOT(A) in the right side, expanded the brackets leaving a trail of A's and B's with OR,AND functions.
    If I remember correctly, I got NOT(A) AND B OR B AND A, I rearranged this using De Morgan's laws to B AND NOT(A) OR A AND B.
    NOT(A) OR A is 0, so that left B OR B.
    B OR B = B
    [I'm gonna use dashes for NOTs because I can't write a bar on here:]
    I got A'.B as my final answer.

    The original thing was (A'+B).(A+(A+B)')' if I remember it correctly.
    De Morgan's laws on the right bracket simplifies (A+(A+B)')' to A'.(A+B), which expands as A'.A + A'.B, which simplifies to [0 + A'.B = ] A'.B.

    Then, we're left with (A'+B).(A'.B), or to rearrange it, A'.(A'+B).B.
    Expand the left two multiplicands: (A'.A' + A'.B).B = (A' + A'.B).B
    Expand the whole thing: A'.B + A'.B.B = A'.B + A'.B = A'.B.

    As a method for checking, I then tried to test the four possible permutations for A and B and I'm pretty sure I got a 1 for A = 0, B = 1 and a 0 for the other three options, which is also what A'.B yields.

    (Original post by TehBrillfighter)
    For the Imperative Programming vs Low Level Language question at the back, what did we get for the advantages and disadvantages for Imperative programming>?
    FYI: Imperative programming is the use of statements in order to change the program's state for the question above it.
    Advantages:
    * One high level instruction can correspond to many low level statements, making high level languages faster to program in.
    [Easier for humans to understand because]
    * Meaningful identifiers
    * Indentation
    * Comments
    * Subroutines

    Disadvantages:
    * Low level programs sometimes execute faster because the instruction set of the program is very similar to that of the computer

    I can't think of any others but I worry that I needed at least one more disadvantage.

    ... and we were simply taught that third generation languages are imperative and fourth generation are declarative; I could have described what 'declarative' meant but I'm pretty sure I'm not getting any marks for the first part of that question.
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    (Original post by ShatnersBassoon)
    The original thing was (A'+B).(A+(A+B)'' if I remember it correctly.
    De Morgan's laws on the right bracket simplifies (A+(A+B)'' to A'.(A+B)

    For using demorgans law on the right hand side I got (A'.(A.B) , do you not swap the operator within the brackets aswel.

    This then simplifies to 0 as Not A AND A can never happen so its zero.

    And since the two sections are connected by an AND then it does not work so I got a final answer of 0 please agree with me (lol) and if failing to do so please explain to me where I have gone wrong
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    (Original post by Nemya_Nation)
    For using demorgans law on the right hand side I got (A'.(A.B) , do you not swap the operator within the brackets aswel
    No, I'm pretty sure you don't.

    The general rule is: X.Y = (X'+Y')'
    For our situation, (A+(A+B)')', X = A and Y = A+B, so it simplifies to A.(A+B)
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    (Original post by ShatnersBassoon)
    No, I'm pretty sure you don't.

    The general rule is: X.Y = (X'+Y''
    For our situation, (A+(A+B)'', X = A and Y = A+B, so it simplifies to A.(A+B)
    I don't think you had to de morgan it. Was a case of expanding the brackets and simplifying!
 
 
 
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