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Is your uni workload too high? Or not high enough? Watch

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    When I started uni at 18 I was gobsmacked at how little work there was to do. By second year I appreciated the lightish workload because I was busy having an amazing time by then. Would happily re live those years

    The workload was a step up at masters level but manageable with good time management. Little time to do other things though.
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    I think my uni has it right, to be honest. (well, from the point of view from a lazy student, anyway :lol:)

    The people who work consistently throughout and are on top of things get the top grades.

    The people who do a bit, but work hard only around exam season can do well/averagely, but not as good as the first lot.

    The people who don't do work or just leave it till the very end either barely pass or fail.. :dontknow:

    So in a sense, the workload is as much or as little as you want it to be, and how high/low you want your grade to be.
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    Now this is an entirely serious question- what sort of things are there to do in a music degree other than listen to and analyse music, and constantly gain understanding about reading music, time signatures, Italian words etc. ?
    Loads of music history and historiography. In Oxbridge music degrees there's relatively little of what you described :yes:



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    How is the third year work load typically?

    I say this as someone who's about to tumble headfirst through the rabbit hole. And onto the other side.

    Starting uni from september.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Too true!

    I had 28 contact hours per week, and probably at least the same in private study including 4 tutorials with work to be done for each of them.

    When I compared with friends doing similar courses at other universities, it was 2 to 3 times as much. And then there were the history students who had 1 or 2 lectures a week, and often didn't go!

    What subject did you do
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    (Original post by V ugvg jhi)

    What subject did you do
    Natural sciences (biological).
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    Interesting that people seem to associate universities swamping their students with a lot of work as somewhat noble, and conversely, regarding less exigent universities as not offering value for money, as if that has anything to do with the workload required by each student at each universities.

    Disregarding economic factors which may explain why workload may be different (e.g. university A wants to save money by having the same pool of professors that teach and design 1st years courses teaching and designing 2nd and 3rd year courses),
    Oxbridge literally competes by requiring their students to do a lot of work.

    That's how they maintain prestige. This would apply to a few top ranked universities as well.

    Other universities may just want their students to achieve "high" degree classifications (e.g. first), so may require less work for such a classification to be achieved, to make it more attainable. The students then leave with a qualification which provides an indication of their education.
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    Interesting that people seem to associate universities swamping their students with a lot of work as somewhat noble, and conversely, regarding less exigent universities as not offering value for money, as if that has anything to do with the workload required by each student at each universities.

    Disregarding economic factors which may explain why workload may be different (e.g. university A wants to save money by having the same pool of professors that teach and design 1st years courses teaching and designing 2nd and 3rd year courses),
    Oxbridge literally competes by requiring their students to do a lot of work.

    That's how they maintain prestige. This would apply to a few top ranked universities as well.

    Other universities may just want their students to achieve "high" degree classifications (e.g. first), so may require less work for such a classification to be achieved, to make it more attainable. The students then leave with a qualification which provides an indication of their education.
    Intriguing....
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    (Original post by chazwomaq)
    Natural sciences (biological).
    terminology heavy that one.
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    I managed to keep up with deadlines as a first year NatSci, it definitely is orders of magnitude more work than A-Level, but once you get past first term, you get used to the daily grind and yes there is still time for 'fun'.
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    (Original post by The_Lonely_Goatherd)
    Loads of music history and historiography. In Oxbridge music degrees there's relatively little of what you described :yes:



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    Ahh okay

    But I don't believe it isn't a real subject by any means; what can I say? I do Dance!

    @jneill I think your popcorn is pretty pointless.
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    Ahh okay

    But I don't believe it isn't a real subject by any means; what can I say? I do Dance!

    @jneill I think your popcorn is pretty pointless.
    Glad to hear it

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    A minor point, but please remember that Oxford and Cambridge have 10 week terms. This means they have to cram work into those 10 weeks that other Unis can do over 12 etc weeks.

    Also, its 'horses for courses' - there are some students who thrive in that sort of intensity/pressure and others who don't. It has nothing to do with intelligence, its all about learning styles.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    A minor point, but please remember that Oxford and Cambridge have 10 week terms. This means they have to cram work into those 10 weeks that other Unis can do over 12 etc weeks.

    Also, its 'horses for courses' - there are some students who thrive in that sort of intensity/pressure and others who don't. It has nothing to do with intelligence, its all about learning styles.
    A good point, and in reality the 'teaching term' is only 8 weeks, so it's a really crammed 8 weeks....
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    Durham Physics: We have quite a high proportion of people getting a 2:2 or below (25-30%). I'd say the course is challenging but manageable if the hours are put in. 4th year was easier for some reason.
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    (Original post by returnmigrant)
    A minor point, but please remember that Oxford and Cambridge have 10 week terms. This means they have to cram work into those 10 weeks that other Unis can do over 12 etc weeks.

    Also, its 'horses for courses' - there are some students who thrive in that sort of intensity/pressure and others who don't. It has nothing to do with intelligence, its all about learning styles.
    Its 8 week terms? I have 9-10 week terms at Durham.
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    Did anyone manage to enlarge the image from the following page?
    https://www.timeshighereducation.com...006151.article
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    (Original post by BioGeek)
    Did anyone manage to enlarge the image from the following page?
    https://www.timeshighereducation.com...006151.article
    Yeah, no. It's broken.

    But I managed to guess the URL

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    (Original post by Wahrheit)
    I left Warwick after second year and am now at UCL studying Economics, just finished first year. Warwick wasn't the right environment for me and I couldn't get a good work ethic there so I wasn't doing that well.

    Differential equations always had very hard exams, yeah! I averaged in the 90s in assignments then got like 36 or so in the exam and I think 44 overall for the module or something, can't remember specifically but something like that. That said instead of revising in first year when it came to exams I just played online poker and runescape so idk if it's normally that dramatic of a drop haha. My experience with uni exams is you normally do about as well as expected but a tiny bit worse. They give you way more marks for understanding than for getting it right, so I'm sure you'll be fine
    Hi I'm an offer holder for Econ at UCL. I was wondering how much the workload is and how difficult first year is? How many hours per day are you working, how many assignments do you get etc? How difficult is the maths - is it a big step up from A Level maths and further maths? Thanks
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    (Original post by Vegan_)
    Hi I'm an offer holder for Econ at UCL. I was wondering how much the workload is and how difficult first year is? How many hours per day are you working, how many assignments do you get etc? How difficult is the maths - is it a big step up from A Level maths and further maths? Thanks
    Depends a bit on options like most courses but I can tell you what it was like for me.

    The maths feels kind of like a continuation of what further maths would be. It's not like the step up between a level and undergrad mathematics, where what is asked of you is actually very different. A lot of people complain about the maths because it's conceptually the hardest of the core modules, but the the module with the most compulsory work is definitely economics. Even so all that's really required is about 4 hours of reading and an hour and a bit of assignments a week.

    Here's the workload for all the core modules not including lectures:

    Econ: 5-6 hours, more if you take notes, 18 assignments
    Maths: 0-12 hours, we had 4 assignments and I left all work to end so it was either 0 hours or or an all nighter...
    Stats: a few hours every two weeks (first term)
    Applied: same as stats (but second term)

    This is if you do the absolute bare minimum and only aim to do the assignments. The recommendation is to do reading to consolidate and do exercises which aren't part of the assignments. I knew most of the maths anyway so I got a free pass on that and most people spent quite a lot of time on it. Then of course you have to add tutorials into the time you spend working, and lectures but you can skip at least half of them without any trouble at all. I like to cut out any inefficiency in working, so I feel I can spend an hour better working alone than going to a lecture I do that.

    If you don't want madness before exams then you can do 30 hours weeks and be on track for a really strong grade I'd say if you're clever and work efficiently.
 
 
 
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