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    (Original post by 99_Problems)
    False. With a degree apprenticeship OP will have a tech degree and significant work experience. If anything OP will have more doors open..
    A tech degree that doesn't teach him fundamental CS concepts which make you a much more reliable software engineer. Experience in a specific company, using their specific protocols and limiting him to getting branded in a certain way if he ever wants to change gears.

    Ultimately, this is a good choice for people who want to work at the target company and know it's exactly what they want - for everyone else, get a degree and build on your outside experience whilst at uni.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    A tech degree that doesn't teach him fundamental CS concepts which make you a much more reliable software engineer. Experience in a specific company, using their specific protocols and limiting him to getting branded in a certain way if he ever wants to change gears.

    Ultimately, this is a good choice for people who want to work at the target company and know it's exactly what they want - for everyone else, get a degree and build on your outside experience whilst at uni.

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    It won't teach him useless algorithm stuff is what you really mean. CS graduates have one of the highest unemployment rates because what is taught does not match what the employers want. Employers will be much more impressed that he/she has real world experience even if it is not in their specific technologies.

    http://blog.hefce.ac.uk/2015/07/08/u...-the-data-say/
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    (Original post by 99_Problems)
    It won't teach him useless algorithm stuff is what you really mean. CS graduates have one of the highest unemployment rates because what is taught does not match what the employers want. Employers will be much more impressed that he/she has real world experience even if it is not in their specific technologies.

    http://blog.hefce.ac.uk/2015/07/08/u...-the-data-say/
    No, no they really will not be impressed by someone doing IT work and doing a degree with on semblance of any CS in it. This type of programme is a pigeonhole if I ever saw one.

    I've seen that analysis, it is nothing new. Go to a good uni, make the most of your free time applying the concepts you've learned in hackathons and projects, apply to internships - badda bing, badda boom, you're in a decent spot.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    No, no they really will not be impressed by someone doing IT work and doing a degree with on semblance of any CS in it. This type of programme is a pigeonhole if I ever saw one.

    I've seen that analysis, it is nothing new. Go to a good uni, make the most of your free time applying the concepts you've learned in hackathons and projects, apply to internships - badda bing, badda boom, you're in a decent spot.
    Wow! I can't believe the solution was so simple, thanks for enlightening me, what's taking government bodies so long working this out? :rolleyes:

    Employers consulted on the tech degree apprenticeship so I will say with great confidence that they will be impressed.

    The company I work with hire developers and want to see real world work experience, We hired a Java developer recently and only asked for a numerical degree, it was the real stuff they had done that was important. If there was a young person who had three years work experience actually developing software in the real world for real companies such as IBM and one who went to a hackathon once or twice and did a home project I know who we'd be hiring.
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    (Original post by 99_Problems)
    Wow! I can't believe the solution was so simple, thanks for enlightening me, what's taking government bodies so long working this out? :rolleyes:

    Employers consulted on the tech degree apprenticeship so I will say with great confidence that they will be impressed.

    The company I work with hire developers and want to see real world work experience, We hired a Java developer recently and only asked for a numerical degree, it was the real stuff they had done that was important. If there was a young person who had three years work experience actually developing software in the real world for real companies such as IBM and one who went to a hackathon once or twice and did a home project I know who we'd be hiring.
    I'm not looking at this from a macro perspective nor do I really care to fully delve into a debate about the merits of both paths. The OP's specific situation (indecision, uncertain about career objectives) favours going for a degree rather than locking themselves into indetured servitude for 5+ years at a company.

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    The above reads like a mash of IT with some semblance of a bus man degree.. I don't see anywhere where the student would learn about algorithms, complexity, AI, programming paradigms, really anything to do with CS.. It's a nice work and study degree but certainly doesn't have the technical breadth and depth of traditional CS.

    It's very unlikely they'd be developing software, it looks more like a business analyst or software testing role would fit the above.
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    (Original post by 99_Problems)
    Wow! I can't believe the solution was so simple, thanks for enlightening me, what's taking government bodies so long working this out? :rolleyes:

    Employers consulted on the tech degree apprenticeship so I will say with great confidence that they will be impressed.

    The company I work with hire developers and want to see real world work experience, We hired a Java developer recently and only asked for a numerical degree, it was the real stuff they had done that was important. If there was a young person who had three years work experience actually developing software in the real world for real companies such as IBM and one who went to a hackathon once or twice and did a home project I know who we'd be hiring.
    Does the fact that the company still asked for a degree despite the experience not say everything about this thread?
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    It really depends what you want to go into; for example, I'm going to university to study Cyber Security, because I want to be employed in that specific field, and the university has a high employment rate particularly for those who do a placement year (paid experience, the university will help you find what you want to do).

    If you know there is a specific area of computing you want to go into, I'd advise trying to find a more specific course as unfortunately, you can study Computer Science almost anywhere and for some jobs would require specific training or top up year university courses after completing a CompScience course.

    I looked at going into an apprenticeship after college, however with an extended level 3 BTEC and Cisco qualifications, a lot of places I enquired to did say I was overqualified as a lot prefer people who've just left school/GCSEs. Cisco sometimes have a few higher ones knocking around, unfortunately I had to turn one down because it ws impossible for me to travel there each morning.

    As for thinking you'll do well, I'm happy you're feeling positive, however remember it depends also how the people applying to the same places have done too!
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    I'm in a similar position. To be fair, competition has been high for most of these degree apprenticeships as well. I still have hope for my own application but even then I'm wondering whether it would be worth it over Uni and getting an Internship later on just for the experience of it and the resources available to students.

    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    What do you see yourself doing in 5 years time?

    Until you've got your results stop being so arrogant. It creates a terrible impression.
    Why is he being arrogant? He's just asking what other people's opinions are on his options. Most people don't know their results until very close to the start date of either an apprenticeship or a degree, it doesn't mean you can't start asking the questions early and making an informed decision.
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    Being honest I would say it's easier to get into university as these degree apprenticeships are in far fewer supply...
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    (Original post by computationchive)
    Being honest I would say it's easier to get into university as these degree apprenticeships are in far fewer supply...
    I'm thinking this is because they are relatively new. But yeah, both fewer in supply and extremely competitive. Some that I've failed the further selection stages for said that there was one position for literally hundreds if not more people. After all, they are funding a third of the costs so they are going to take their best pick.
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    (Original post by Sicudeh)
    Why is he being arrogant? He's just asking what other people's opinions are on his options.
    I guess you didn't read his second sentence. Starting 'I hate to boast, but...' isn't going to go down too well. If you have predicted grades then fine, but claiming your results 'will impress top unis' comes across as extremely arrogant.
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    It all depends on you OP, if u do apprenticeship and I do Bsc, in 5 to 7 years I'll be earning your dream salary

    And you will never be considered as an engineer without a Bsc, goodluck trying to impress facebooks HR department with limited programming skills



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