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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    It's likely that a civil war will break out if we don't. The people have had enough of this sh*t. I don't care if we lose Scotland and Ireland either. This is a democratic country, they can vote to leave if they want to it's no biggie.
    Perhaps.

    Still makes no difference.

    MPs are voted in by constituents, and SNP have power in British parliament.

    And the majority of MPs are for remain,

    So unfortunately it's not a guarantee at all that the Act will be passed.
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    Officially it's only an opinion poll but in reality it's binding as no govt could ignore it and maintain credibility.

    It looks like we're heading for a very polarised country unfortunately.
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    Even Farage himself a few months ago said a narrow 52-48 vote would mean 'unfinished business' and he'd want a second ref, and that's exactly what we've got, albeit the other way round so I'm guessing he won't be calling for a second ref now, but can you really enact such a significant and long lasting move based on such a narrow and small majority?
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    Officially it's only an opinion poll but in reality it's binding as no govt could ignore it and maintain credibility.

    It looks like we're heading for a very polarised country unfortunately.
    This would be the case if David Cameron and Shadows could pass the Act.

    Unfortunately, they can't pass the Act, MPs, members of House of Lords, and committees do.

    Even in the House of Commons, MPs only have a duty to their constituents, because they are the ones who keep them in power.

    If their constituents want to remain, they have no incentive to let the Act be passed.

    This is particularly true for SNP, who surely not pass the Act.
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    (Original post by Olie)
    Even Farage himself a few months ago said a narrow 52-48 vote would mean 'unfinished business' and he'd want a second ref, and that's exactly what we've got, albeit the other way round so I'm guessing he won't be calling for a second ref now, but can you really enact such a significant and long lasting move based on such a narrow and small majority?
    Yes. Because it was made clear beforehand that it was going to be down to which side got the majority no matter how small that majority was.
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    (Original post by Olie)
    Even Farage himself a few months ago said a narrow 52-48 vote would mean 'unfinished business' and he'd want a second ref, and that's exactly what we've got, albeit the other way round so I'm guessing he won't be calling for a second ref now, but can you really enact such a significant and long lasting move based on such a narrow and small majority?
    Exactly. This is a joke.

    First of all a 2% difference from 50/50 is nonsense. Surely with the margin of error of this census?
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    Doesn't matter what your intentions are no offense.

    There is no guarantee such an Act would even be passed when groups like the SNP are firmly against it.
    ...
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    This would be the case if David Cameron and Shadows could pass the Act.

    Unfortunately, they can't pass the Act, MPs, members of House of Lords, and committees do.

    Even in the House of Commons, MPs only have a duty to their constituents, because they are the ones who keep them in power.

    If their constituents want to remain, they have no incentive to let the Act be passed.

    This is particularly true for SNP, who surely not pass the Act.
    I can't see it happening. Looking at the vote map, if this was a FPTP style referendum it would have been a landslide for Leave so it'd be political suicide for most MP's.
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    (Original post by JamesN88)
    I can't see it happening. Looking at the vote map, if this was a FPTP style referendum it would have been a landslide for Leave so it'd be political suicide for most MP's.
    Problem is that of undecideds as well, I suppose.

    But assuming everyone voted, 54MPs from SNP + minority of labour + minority of Tories, could block the Act.
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    Problem is that of undecideds as well, I suppose.

    But assuming everyone voted, 54MPs from SNP + minority of labour + minority of Tories, could block the Act.
    Tbh I think we'll end up joining EFTA making this whole exercise largely pointless. If that was a 3rd option I may have chosen it to ditch the Common Fisheries Policy.
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    MPs have no incentive to vote to pass an Act if the majority of their constituency are against it.


    So I wouldn't bet on it.
    Avoiding riots across the country and a PR nightmare is a pretty big incentive. For all their faults MPs aren't stupid.

    Even though the referendum wasn't legally binding we're leaving the EU. It's going to happen. I promise you.
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    Avoiding riots across the country and a PR nightmare is a pretty big incentive. For all their faults MPs aren't stupid.

    Even though the referendum wasn't legally binding we're leaving the EU. It's going to happen. I promise you.
    Not sure tbh.

    SNP can't vote to pass the Act and expect peace in Scotland.

    Some English MPs may listen to their constituencies more.
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    We're going to leave all right.

    If we don't, all those old farts will riot!
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    Not sure tbh.

    SNP can't vote to pass the Act and expect peace in Scotland.

    Some English MPs may listen to their constituencies more.
    It's got nothing to do with the SNP. Constitutional matters aren't devolved to Scotland. A second Scottish independence referendum is a completely separate issue.

    It's got nothing to do with constituencies. The Conservatives have a majority and therefore a mandate to carry out their manifesto pledges, including invoking Article 50.
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    Not sure tbh.

    SNP can't vote to pass the Act and expect peace in Scotland.

    Some English MPs may listen to their constituencies more.
    Fairly sure no Scottish MP will vote to invoke Article 50. The question is how many Conservatives will rebel against what is likely to be a three line whip.
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    (Original post by Duncan2012)
    It's got nothing to do with the SNP. Constitutional matters aren't devolved to Scotland. A second Scottish independence referendum is a completely separate issue.

    It's got nothing to do with constituencies. The Conservatives have a majority and therefore a mandate to carry out their manifesto pledges, including invoking Article 50.
    Sorry mate, wrong. This is like any other act:

    http://www.standard.co.uk/business/a...-a3272621.html
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    (Original post by Armpits)
    Sorry mate, wrong. This is like any other act:

    http://www.standard.co.uk/business/a...-a3272621.html
    Tell me what you think is wrong in my post and I'll show you why you're mistaken.
 
 
 
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