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Bremain's contempt towards the working class and older generations. watch

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    Today has literally been threads from Bremainers and Brexiters throwing digs at each other.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Today has literally been threads from Bremainers and Brexiters throwing digs at each other.
    Welcome to the modern political landscape. It is rather depressing.
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    I was taught respect for my elders.

    People who fought in the war voted for us to leave. I have more respect for them than some Remain voter who has barely exited puberty.
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    (Original post by celloel)
    I may add, just because someone holds a degree does not mean they are more intelligent.

    Having a degree in things such as Art, Media, Film, English - the list goes on - is not an indication of intelligence, rather academia.
    Had to get in a BA degree dig eh?

    (Original post by Danny the Geezer)
    I just rly hope I can buy Lindor in shops. :pain:
    I'm sorry, no more "master chocolatiers" for you. Get used to Cadburys.
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    (Original post by 99_Problems)
    Had to get in a BA degree dig eh?



    I'm sorry, no more "master chocolatiers" for you. Get used to Cadburys.
    I will look on the Dark Web and get it imported if I have to
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    (Original post by The Roast)
    Somehow the educated know what's good for the poor, and they end up coming to dispise them. This is what the Remain camp is demonstrating right now. It's naked, disgusting contempt for people who have interests seperate to their own.

    The Remain camp are generally bourgeois as ****, and they don't seem to understand that this has put them out of touch from people who are actually directly on the ground experiencing the realities of the policies they are advocating for.

    These are the builders who have been put out by Polish workers, these are people who have had to deal with Eastern European migrants and migrants from other places. They want control of the borders and they want reduced immigration because it's making their lives tough.

    When you're living in London with a lovely 2 bedroom condo, you're not dealing with the same problems as those living in a small house with 8 people in Rochdale.

    They are different to you, but they're still citizens and still get a vote, and your contempt will just make them resent you.
    I could not agree more!!
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    But what does this have to do with the EU? OUR GOVERNMENT imposes austerity and takes money away from public services, while giving tax cuts to the rich. The EU, meanwhile, invests heavily in the poorest parts of the country. Why would anyone vote out of the EU to spite the government? Does anyone really think that the Tories will have a change of heart and start funding welfare and healthcare properly after seeing that the working class are completely unwilling to hold them accountable? The message people have sent is "we don't like what you're doing, but you can keep doing it, because we'll keep punishing everyone except the people responsible."



    Yeah but I'm curious about your thoughts.
    Firstly the EU MONEY we get as a rebate is OUR MONEY. Only the EU distribute it around and some of it is spent on utter waste like ARTS Project. Having watched BRexit the Movie I have seen how the EU wastes OUR money on projects such as funding the ARTS.
    The British working class people ARE not stupid and can easily see through BS. This a community which has been through Austerity and were punished meanwhile the RICH were given TAX CUTS.
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    (Original post by Jee1)
    Firstly the EU MONEY we get as a rebate is OUR MONEY. Only the EU distribute it around and some of it is spent on utter waste like ARTS Project. Having watched BRexit the Movie I have seen how the EU wastes OUR money on projects such as funding the ARTS.
    You're stupid if you based your decision on Brexit The Movie. Did it not occur to you that maybe a political propaganda piece isn't going to be the best source of impartial information?

    The British working class people ARE not stupid and can easily see through BS. This a community which has been through Austerity and were punished meanwhile the RICH were given TAX CUTS.
    Austerity and tax cuts given by..... our own government........ which has nothing to do with the EU.......... but you just gave our government even more power............ while the government was giving tax cuts to the rich, the EU introduced your employment rights and was investing (sorry, "wasting" our money on the poorest areas of the country, that our government refuses to fund.

    Do you not understand the difference between our government and the EU? How the hell have you managed to decide that the EU is responsible for our government giving tax cuts???????????????????????????? ???????????????????????????????? ?????????????

    (Original post by Cato the Elder)
    I was taught respect for my elders.

    People who fought in the war voted for us to leave. I have more respect for them than some Remain voter who has barely exited puberty.
    Actually, no they didn't. People old enough to have been around for WW2 voted majority remain. You do realise very few old people currently alive in the UK were alive during WW2??? You'd have to be 80+ to have fought in WW2 and be voting in this referendum.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...-a7019646.html

    Let's be honest - you're only respecting your elders because you thought they agreed with you. You never actually bothered to check.

    I also don't understand how "respecting your elders" means you should do what they say is best. By that logic we should still be living in caves.
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    (Original post by The Roast)
    Somehow the educated know what's good for the poor, and they end up coming to dispise them. This is what the Remain camp is demonstrating right now. It's naked, disgusting contempt for people who have interests seperate to their own.

    The Remain camp are generally bourgeois as ****, and they don't seem to understand that this has put them out of touch from people who are actually directly on the ground experiencing the realities of the policies they are advocating for.

    These are the builders who have been put out by Polish workers, these are people who have had to deal with Eastern European migrants and migrants from other places. They want control of the borders and they want reduced immigration because it's making their lives tough.

    When you're living in London with a lovely 2 bedroom condo, you're not dealing with the same problems as those living in a small house with 8 people in Rochdale.

    They are different to you, but they're still citizens and still get a vote, and your contempt will just make them resent you.
    Fantastic post. There was another poster on here who made a thread complaining that leave voters are 'old people' and people like 'becky 1 gcse'. A pretty typical, horribly bourgeois example of the kind of contempt champagne socialists and Guardianistas feel for anyone who isn't of their ilk. Accusations of stupidity seem to be most common among bremainers against brexiters. Apparently a majority of the country are idiots who have been fooled or mislead into making this decision. And yet when it comes to spouting ridiculous doom-and-gloom hyperbole and misinformation, since the result the remainers have been easily trumping the leavers.

    I just really hope Brexit works out. That we form a new kind of alliance with America and Australia, and the EU collapses, and we all fair better without it, because it will really be a triumph for all those groups in the UK who voted for a Brexit and are regularly told by Guardianista types that they're stupid, backwards, foolish, and worst of all, unworthy of having an opinion.
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    It's incredibly sad, in my view, that the people who will suffer the most from Brexit are the ones who were hoodwinked into voting for it by people such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove. Patronising or not, it's a hard fact that the British public have incredibly false beliefs (all reflecting negatively on the EU, of course) about the EU, on top of the already existing fact that people consistently over-estimate the number of immigrants in the country, the amount of benefits fraud, and the amount we spend on foreign aid.

    Already, we've seen their promises evaporate into thin air: immigration is not going to come down significantly (indeed Gove and Johnson, as advocates of the free-market, are pro-immigration as they've repeatedly said); and there won't be any more money for public services. Rather, we'll see economic growth slow (there probably won't be a recession, but we will see significant costs), and that means less revenue for public services and less income for low-skilled and uneducated natives who overwhelmingly voted to leave.

    Nonetheless, the Brexit vote was a clear sign that something is very wrong in this country: stagnant wages, insecure jobs and a health service under strain. As the King's Fund has said, the NHS is in its most austere period in history.

    The strains on public services and the lack of investment in infrastructure and housing all stems from this government's ideological - and economically illiterate - decision to adopt an austerity agenda.

    Now's the time for Labour to unite behind their leader and drive home an anti-austerity economic agenda which will resonate with disaffected voters who will - invariably - be disappointed by the effects of Brexit and the lies from the Leave campaign.

    With the IMF and the OECD having called for the British government to take advantage of record low interest rates, and invest in long-term infrastructure projects, now's the time to grow the economy, get incomes rising and create thousands of jobs for British workers. (It's ironic that Cameron and Osborne, who continually cited the IMF and the OECD, ignore their advice on this.)

    On immigration, there's no point in trying to speak the facts: people just won't listen. Immigration only has a slightly negative impact on the employment of low-skilled natives (counterbalanced by the creation of more jobs for medium to high-skilled natives), and only has a negligible to small negative impact on the wages of low-skilled natives (with a positive impact on the wages of medium to high-skilled natives, making it slightly positive overall). Studies differ, but as Jonathan Portes said, commenting on the most pessimistic study from two Bank of England economists, which stated that a 10% rise in immigration leads to a 2% drop in wages for some low-skilled natives:

    In other words, the research confirms what we already thought. Immigration may have some, small, negative impact on wages for some low-paid workers. But the idea that immigration is the main or even a moderately important driver of low pay is simply not supported by the available evidence. Politicians who claim the contrary are either so obsessed with immigration that they are blind to more important issues - or they are merely trying to divert attention from their failure to propose policy measures that would actually make a meaningful difference to the low paid.
    Yes, immigration raises GDP per capita. But people won't listen.

    As a result, talk from Labour figures of instead using the net contribution that immigrants make to the public finances - as well as money from elsewhere - to help communities most affected by migration is welcome. EU migrants, on the margin, contributed £28.7 billion more to the public purse than they took; non-EU migrants made a net contribution of £20.5 billion. (See table 6). They should also be talking about a surtax on immigration: don't restrict immigration, tax it.

    We could learn some lessons from a particularly well done 2013 study by Peri and Foged, who tracked the wages and employment of every individual worker in Denmark from 1991-2008, and tracked how they responded to large influxes of refugees from places like Somalia, Afghanistan and Bosnia.

    This is a particularly robust study because the Danish government randomly distributed these refugees to counties in Denmark, giving the researchers a great data-set to work with. They found that average wages, native low-skilled wages and low-skilled native employment all increased, along with occupational mobility. So, let's try to spread immigration more uniformly around Britain.

    This issue is not going to go away: immigration will still be too high in the eyes of many, and the most prominent leave campaigners are all pro-immigration and were personally, I suspect, pro-freedom-of-movement. They're advocates of the free-market, after all.

    These kinds of keyhole solutions are better for everyone: both for low-skilled and uneducated natives who are rightly angry at their economic situation, and for immigrants, who should be free to seek a better life for themselves and their families. It's what we would do in their situations, after all.
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    This is all very well and good except Brexit most likely won't make a difference to immigration.

    We need access to the open market for our economy but as Brexit repeatedly said was Norway had access to the open market and isn't in the EU. What they didn't say was the Norway is subject to the free movement laws within the EU but doesn't have any vote in any EU legislation.

    So the UK just voted to not have any votes on laws that will impact our population.
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    (Original post by The Roast)
    Somehow the educated know what's good for the poor, and they end up coming to dispise them. This is what the Remain camp is demonstrating right now. It's naked, disgusting contempt for people who have interests seperate to their own.

    The Remain camp are generally bourgeois as ****, and they don't seem to understand that this has put them out of touch from people who are actually directly on the ground experiencing the realities of the policies they are advocating for.

    These are the builders who have been put out by Polish workers, these are people who have had to deal with Eastern European migrants and migrants from other places. They want control of the borders and they want reduced immigration because it's making their lives tough.

    When you're living in London with a lovely 2 bedroom condo, you're not dealing with the same problems as those living in a small house with 8 people in Rochdale.

    They are different to you, but they're still citizens and still get a vote, and your contempt will just make them resent you.
    I've got my share of being insulted for Leaving :hello: lmao. And it's ALL GOOD you know why? Because it's just their fear mongering beforehand and bitterness afterward. Nothing to worry about then and now :cool:
    And exactly these remainers are so...:facepalm2: in this bubble. Either children, celebrities who don't know/care what's at stake, who can afford to Tweet nonsense while they get their toes done, or people of colour guilt tripped into it. I mean did you hear Beckham's reasoning? He said, "Because of his international football club." :indiff: Will he sit his spoilt rich arse down? No one gives a **** about you and your flipping ball you get paid millions to kick?!
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    (Original post by viddy9)
    It's incredibly sad, in my view, that the people who will suffer the most from Brexit are the ones who were hoodwinked into voting for it by people such as Boris Johnson and Michael Gove. Patronising or not, it's a hard fact that the British public have incredibly false beliefs (all reflecting negatively on the EU, of course) about the EU, on top of the already existing fact that people consistently over-estimate the number of immigrants in the country, the amount of benefits fraud, and the amount we spend on foreign aid.

    Already, we've seen their promises evaporate into thin air: immigration is not going to come down significantly (indeed Gove and Johnson, as advocates of the free-market, are pro-immigration as they've repeatedly said); and there won't be any more money for public services. Rather, we'll see economic growth slow (there probably won't be a recession, but we will see significant costs), and that means less revenue for public services and less income for low-skilled and uneducated natives who overwhelmingly voted to leave.

    Nonetheless, the Brexit vote was a clear sign that something is very wrong in this country: stagnant wages, insecure jobs and a health service under strain. As the King's Fund has said, the NHS is in its most austere period in history.

    The strains on public services and the lack of investment in infrastructure and housing all stems from this government's ideological - and economically illiterate - decision to adopt an austerity agenda.

    Now's the time for Labour to unite behind their leader and drive home an anti-austerity economic agenda which will resonate with disaffected voters who will - invariably - be disappointed by the effects of Brexit and the lies from the Leave campaign.

    With the IMF and the OECD having called for the British government to take advantage of record low interest rates, and invest in long-term infrastructure projects, now's the time to grow the economy, get incomes rising and create thousands of jobs for British workers. (It's ironic that Cameron and Osborne, who continually cited the IMF and the OECD, ignore their advice on this.)

    On immigration, there's no point in trying to speak the facts: people just won't listen. Immigration only has a slightly negative impact on the employment of low-skilled natives (counterbalanced by the creation of more jobs for medium to high-skilled natives), and only has a negligible to small negative impact on the wages of low-skilled natives (with a positive impact on the wages of medium to high-skilled natives, making it slightly positive overall). Studies differ, but as Jonathan Portes said, commenting on the most pessimistic study from two Bank of England economists, which stated that a 10% rise in immigration leads to a 2% drop in wages for some low-skilled natives:



    Yes, immigration raises GDP per capita. But people won't listen.

    As a result, talk from Labour figures of instead using the net contribution that immigrants make to the public finances - as well as money from elsewhere - to help communities most affected by migration is welcome. EU migrants, on the margin, contributed £28.7 billion more to the public purse than they took; non-EU migrants made a net contribution of £20.5 billion. (See table 6). They should also be talking about a surtax on immigration: don't restrict immigration, tax it.

    We could learn some lessons from a particularly well done 2013 study by Peri and Foged, who tracked the wages and employment of every individual worker in Denmark from 1991-2008, and tracked how they responded to large influxes of refugees from places like Somalia, Afghanistan and Bosnia.

    This is a particularly robust study because the Danish government randomly distributed these refugees to counties in Denmark, giving the researchers a great data-set to work with. They found that average wages, native low-skilled wages and low-skilled native employment all increased, along with occupational mobility. So, let's try to spread immigration more uniformly around Britain.

    This issue is not going to go away: immigration will still be too high in the eyes of many, and the most prominent leave campaigners are all pro-immigration and were personally, I suspect, pro-freedom-of-movement. They're advocates of the free-market, after all.

    These kinds of keyhole solutions are better for everyone: both for low-skilled and uneducated natives who are rightly angry at their economic situation, and for immigrants, who should be free to seek a better life for themselves and their families. It's what we would do in their situations, after all.
    It's only been 24 hours...
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    (Original post by The Roast)
    Somehow the educated know what's good for the poor, and they end up coming to dispise them. This is what the Remain camp is demonstrating right now. It's naked, disgusting contempt for people who have interests seperate to their own.

    The Remain camp are generally bourgeois as ****, and they don't seem to understand that this has put them out of touch from people who are actually directly on the ground experiencing the realities of the policies they are advocating for.

    These are the builders who have been put out by Polish workers, these are people who have had to deal with Eastern European migrants and migrants from other places. They want control of the borders and they want reduced immigration because it's making their lives tough.

    When you're living in London with a lovely 2 bedroom condo, you're not dealing with the same problems as those living in a small house with 8 people in Rochdale.

    They are different to you, but they're still citizens and still get a vote, and your contempt will just make them resent you.
    Couldn't agree more!

    These remainers are bullying everyone else on social media that has a different opinion from them. It reminds me of the SNP during the Scottish Referendum tbh.

    But the quiet majority won then, just as it has won now.

    The chattering classes are called this for a reason. ;-)
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    (Original post by 0to100)
    It's only been 24 hours...
    Indeed. 24 hours in, and freedom of movement may still be in place according to prominent Brexiteers, and there will be no extra money for the NHS, of course. (Not that there ever would have been, because: a) that £350 million figure was a lie; and b) as I said, we'll have less revenue due to the economy's inevitable slowdown).

    As Nick Cohen put it in this article in The Spectator:

    If Brexit triumphs and — contrary to its proponents’ assurances — jobs go, workers’ rights disappear and living standards fall, if our enemies everywhere make their delight clear that Britain has turned its back on the world, if all the promises of a magic money tree turn out to be as fraudulent now as they ever were, right-wing populists will learn what true populist anger looks like. Brexit voters won’t blame themselves. Voters never do. They will blame the politicians and pundits who made them look like fools. Common sense will turn into communal rage as those who have accused everyone else of lying will be revealed as the greatest liars of all.
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    (Original post by Supersaps)
    Couldn't agree more!

    These remainers are bullying everyone else on social media that has a different opinion from them. It reminds me of the SNP during the Scottish Referendum tbh.

    But the quiet majority won then, just as it has won now.

    The chattering classes are called this for a reason. ;-)
    When leavers have a say, "they're racist, they're this they're that." Nothing else do they got. Before the votes were even counted, "sore loser, bullies, be more accepting, this is democracy" all this bravado. Now it's them complaining lol and aggressively too.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    I am working class, and I fail to understand how damaging our economy, and leaving the organisation that invests in the poorest parts of the country and provides most of the rights protecting the poorest and most vulnerable, while giving full power to a Conservative government that' in the process of privatising our services and leaving us to rot, is going to benefit me.
    That is the problem isn't it with alot of people, there only interested in what benefits THEM and this is on both sides of the camp
 
 
 
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