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I voted Leave and 2 things are really making me regret it watch

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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    I Voted Leave, and I dont regret my decision at all. Everything is going well, just as I hoped:

    The financial market of UK has calmed after Mark Carney, the governor of Bank of England has said that he will inject £250 billion into the financial system to steady the economy.
    Oh a bailout? How encouraging :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by maryamzahid)
    A lot of people are regretting their vote so don't be hard on yourself.
    I personally blame the tactics used by both parties. If we all were informed better, I feel a fairer result would have been in play.
    This is just my view, as I chose to stay in.
    Now the country will have to respect this and build itself back up to be strong and independent.
    A lot of people are regretting their vote? I don't know anyone who is regretting their vote. Is their any evidence for your claim?
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    I Voted Leave, and I dont regret my decision at all. Everything is going well, just as I hoped:

    The financial market of UK has calmed after Mark Carney, the governor of Bank of England has said that he will inject £250 billion into the financial system to steady the economy.
    Going well? You call every single European stock market falling up to 10% GOING WELL?!

    And where on earth is this £250 billion coming from? Wouldn't it by fantastic if we'd voted remain and we didn't have to suddenly waste £250 billion on the notion of a democratic deficit (caused by the lack of voter engagement with the EU itself, that's right, if people were more willing to engage with the EU then the politicians would be more responsive), at best, or the monumental lie of "getting our country back from the foreigners" at worse. The incorrect £350 million per week membership fee is piffle in comparison to the size of this cash injection, but according to leave its just a bottomless source of funding for the NHS, education, defence and heck knows what else they promised. Even Farage admitted today that this figure was a lie, but it's too late now as ignorance has won out.

    Believe me, I hope the Brexiters are right because if they aren't then this country is doomed. But in the likely event that the leave campaign was wrong, then it will be the poorest in society who will suffer the most as they see cuts to their benefits and further austerity, despite being the very people the leave campaign sought to protect!
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    (Original post by Thutmose-III)
    A lot of people are regretting their vote? I don't know anyone who is regretting their vote. Is their any evidence for your claim?
    I've met quite a few today.
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    (Original post by Miracle Day)
    Oh a bailout? How encouraging :rolleyes:
    No bailout has been necessary, and in fact Carney merely informed banks that a line of credit was available to them if needed.

    It wasn't needed in the end because the markets stabilised themselves and in fact the FTSE 100 closed this afternoon higher than it opened on Monday (in other words the stock market is up this week even with the Brexit vote)
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    (Original post by Sebastian Bartlett)
    I completely agree but is very important to see why this divide has been so great and its just enfranchising young voters even more than before.
    One particular group of people gets upset that another particular group of people gets more votes and get their way? That's life - someone has to be on the losing side.
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    (Original post by Miracle Day)
    Oh a bailout? How encouraging :rollseyes:
    Ofcourse. I believe in the super powers of Great Britain. I believe we will recover and our economy will be much better than if we had Remained.

    If we had Remained, we would have been even more ****ed. You have absolutely no idea how much. The bankers of this country and outside of this country have their own agenda. We just saved your asses.

    Just relax guys. Just relax! Go make a sandwich or something, or have an ice cream, enjoy the democracy and relax. Everything will be fine. Stop worrying people.
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Going well? You call every single European stock market falling up to 10% GOING WELL?!
    Actually, the FTSE 100 closed this afternoon higher than it opened on Monday morning. That means the UK stock market has gone up this week in spite of the Brexit vote.

    And where on earth is this £250 billion coming from?
    Central banks have the ability to create new money. And in any case it wasn't a giveaway, Carney merely announced that a 250 billion line of credit was available to the banks if they required it. If they had needed it, it would have been paid back with interest and in any case it wasn't required as the British stock market stabilised itself.

    As for the large losses on the French and German exchanges, that emphasises how weak they are compared to the UK at this time and that they cannot afford to put up trade barriers to punish the UK. It also indicates they probably should have thought more carefully before they declined to give Cameron any sort deal that he could actually take back to the British people plausibly.

    ut in the likely event that the leave campaign was wrong, then it will be the poorest in society who will suffer the most
    The poorest in society disproportionately work in service industries that are oriented toward the UK's internal market. And to the extent they will be affected, the Better Staying in Europe's campaign director went before parliament in April and said we must not Leave as that would lead to wages rising and that the corporations couldn't have that.
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    Going well? You call every single European stock market falling up to 10% GOING WELL?!

    And where on earth is this £250 billion coming from? Wouldn't it by fantastic if we'd voted remain and we didn't have to suddenly waste £250 billion on the notion of a democratic deficit (caused by the lack of voter engagement with the EU itself, that's right, if people were more willing to engage with the EU then the politicians would be more responsive), at best, or the monumental lie of "getting our country back from the foreigners" at worse. The incorrect £350 million per week membership fee is piffle in comparison to the size of this cash injection, but according to leave its just a bottomless source of funding for the NHS, education, defence and heck knows what else they promised. Even Farage admitted today that this figure was a lie, but it's too late now as ignorance has won out.

    Believe me, I hope the Brexiters are right because if they aren't then this country is doomed. But in the likely event that the leave campaign was wrong, then it will be the poorest in society who will suffer the most as they see cuts to their benefits and further austerity, despite being the very people the leave campaign sought to protect!
    PRSOM.
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    My friends that voted Leave are also regretting it. All of us are united in feeling like this is the worst thing that's ever happened to our country. It just took it happening for them to finally see their mistake.
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    (Original post by Sebastian Bartlett)
    Well you never know it could still turn out great or even have another referendum. I would also argue it was an awfully run remain camp that just attacked people and the country and a poor Labour leadership that failed to appeal to its traditional voters. They did this more than any individual.
    I disagree. Britain Stronger made a strong case with facts. If you look at their website, social media or any of their campaign materials you'll see them promoting expert opinions and sourced facts. Unfortunately they didn't have millions to spend on advertising like Vote Leave did, and they had too much integrity to stoop to advertising lies and hateful rhetoric.

    Facts just don't make headlines, because it's much more exciting to read about politicians making sly digs.

    All the information was there for people that bothered to look for it, and there's really no excuse for not doing it when everyone has internet access.
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    This is why people need to take politics and their vote more seriously. Idiot can't be bothered to do some research themselves for facts and now are there, thinking "oh ****."

    Well ****ing done.
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    Oh well, it is what it is
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    Ofcourse. I believe in the super powers of Great Britain. I believe we will recover and our economy will be much better than if we had Remained.

    If we had Remained, we would have been even more ****ed. You have absolutely no idea how much. The bankers of this country and outside of this country have their own agenda. We just saved your asses.

    Just relax guys. Just relax! Go make a sandwich or something, or have an ice cream, enjoy the democracy and relax. Everything will be fine. Stop worrying people.
    Enjoy the democracy and stop worrying?

    I'm sure ByEeek is enjoying and not worried about his pension dropping by 10%.
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    (Original post by Thutmose-III)
    Actually, the FTSE 100 closed this afternoon higher than it opened on Monday morning. That means the UK stock market has gone up this week in spite of the Brexit vote.

    The pound is still at a much lower level against the dollar than before this vote, and the share prices in many businesses have still fell dramatically. Being at a higher level than on Monday doesn't necessarily make it an overall good event, although admittedly I am surprised and we likely have Carney at least somewhat to thank for. Shame that the EU referendum has caused such uncertainty in investor confidence though, had we had not even held a referendum then we would never have had such a crash that has wiped off billions in the first place. And it still has wiped off billions. Housing companies such as Crest Nicholson have seen falls of 26% in their share-price, yet the Brexiters somehow expect this to be beneficial in the interest of reducing overcowding.


    Central banks have the ability to create new money. And in any case it wasn't a giveaway, Carney merely announced that a 250 billion line of credit was available to the banks if they required it. If they had needed it, it would have been paid back with interest and in any case it wasn't required as the British stock market stabilised itself.

    As for the large losses on the French and German exchanges, that emphasises how weak they are compared to the UK at this time and that they cannot afford to put up trade barriers to punish the UK. It also indicates they probably should have thought more carefully before they declined to give Cameron any sort deal that he could actually take back to the British people plausibly.

    And creating new money would just devalue the currency even more, but thankfully it was not needed as it turns out. But this is nevertheless inefficient for the market, these measures would never have been needed if a Brexit vote didn't come to fruition. Forcing the banks to take out emergency loans such as these is just forcing them to pay back a large sum completely unnecessarily, You keep acting like everything is fine, but realistically billions have been lost and quite frankly we're lucky that, thus far, it hasn't been worse.

    And losses in the foreign markets is not something to celebrate, billions have been lost there too and it's entirely the leave campaign's fault. Of course a trade deal will be made, but it will be far worse than the one we have now because the EU needs to make an example of us and deter anyone else from leaving. Trade will continue, but with more barriers than before.


    The poorest in society disproportionately work in service industries that are oriented toward the UK's internal market. And to the extent they will be affected, the Better Staying in Europe's campaign director went before parliament in April and said we must not Leave as that would lead to wages rising and that the corporations couldn't have that.

    If wages rise too much then small businesses in particular literally won't be able to afford it. Furthermore, as new import tariffs have a possibility of being introduced depending on the type of deal we negotiate, corporations will raise prices to maintain their profit margins. And who will struggle to pay for this the most? The poorest among us. Add in fuel and the cost of living will soon significantly increase, and the man on the minimum wage is suddenly going to find his quality of life decreasing rapidly.
    Answers in bold.
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    (Original post by Sebastian Bartlett)
    1) I didn't believe that Scotland would be so Pro-EU and I do not wish for the UK to break up. Which it still may not but it is more of a risk than thought likely. I would prefer a United Britain in the EU than a fragmented one out (my top choice would be a united out but that is looking increasingly less likely to happen).
    It will be to Scotland's loss so nobody cares.

    2) The younger votes have been ignored.
    That's mostly a good thing. Contrary to popular belief the younger generation are not as clever or enlightened as they like to think. There is a difference between thinking you know and actually knowing. The treatment of the older generation, as if they are all the old fool down the pub, is ridiculous. Its like judging the younger generation by the idiot in school who got the local sixteen year old knocked up. Its completely idiotic.

    It would be great if the younger generation, just for a moment, took a time to climb down from out of their own ********s and they might just learn something.

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    Ummm your vote shouldn't be depending on how pro-EU Scotland is anyways.

    The people who support EU such as Nigel Farage is already dismissing the promises made in for the leave campaign.

    Source: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk...ign_type=Email

    Oh and I got you something...
    Spoiler:
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    (Original post by welshiee)
    That's mostly a good thing. Contrary to popular belief the younger generation are not as clever or enlightened as they like to think. There is a difference between thinking you know and actually knowing. The treatment of the older generation, as if they are all the old fool down the pub, is ridiculous. Its like judging the younger generation by the idiot in school who got the local sixteen year old knocked up. Its completely idiotic.

    It would be great if the younger generation, just for a moment, took a time to climb down from out of their own ********s and they might just learn something.
    Yet the older generation dragged us through a recession less than 10 years ago, and before we'd even recovered they managed to drop the pound like a sack of **** faster than any currency has ever dropped in history.

    Wise sages clearly know what they're doing.
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    (Original post by Naveed-7)
    I Voted Leave, and I dont regret my decision at all. Everything is going well, just as I hoped:

    The financial market of UK has calmed after Mark Carney, the governor of Bank of England has said that he will inject £250 billion into the financial system to steady the economy.
    Not like that money could have been used for anything else.
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    (Original post by JordanL_)
    Yet the older generation dragged us through a recession less than 10 years ago, and before we'd even recovered they managed to drop the pound like a sack of **** faster than any currency has ever dropped in history.

    Wise sages clearly know what they're doing.
    Thats just the nature of the current way economics is done in the world. Its a world of booms and busts, and until the entire economic outlook changes that will always be the case. To suggest that is the result of the older generation is utterly moronic. Even more so when the same generation was hit hard on pensions, many even lost them and many died due to the lack of help with heating bills in the colder months. Stop peddling such drivel.
 
 
 
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