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There is a Leave case for a further referendum Watch

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    If we de-cucked ourself do you really want to get back into a cuck relationship?
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    I support Remain but a second referendum would be a very bad idea. Looking at the damage done to British society by one referendum, it doesn't make me particularly enthusiastic for another. I do however agree with a lot of what you said, the Leave package is impossible and the British people need to pick one or the other.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    What happens IF we do have another EU Referendum, with the same SAME result, would there be a third, fourth, fifth, sixth etc.
    There won't be. The Tory Eurosceptics would be appeased and the UKIP voters basing their arguments solely on immigration would not gather sufficient support to win another referendum.

    Regardless, I don't want another referendum. I would rather the British government agree an EFTA and bilateral trade agreement with the EU and then move on by saying it was the best decision made in the interests of the people. Another referendum just gives the idiots an opportunity to embarrass the UK further on the world stage. We now need true leaders to step up on the world stage and make themselves known.
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    I'm all for free movement if it requires people to find a job first or declare they have the financial ability to make a living, we simply cannot say no to cheap labour from immigrants when international competition has never been this tough. Do we take under skilled British workers demanding more and more pay or do we take immigrants with great skills that are fairly happy with their pay in the most part? The argument of immigrants stealing our jobs is completely invalid.
    From an economic perspective, taking in cheap labour from Eastern Europe is certainly a plus to the economy. However, the UK has a living wage for a reason as it allows all people to live above the poverty line. We shouldn't let those at the bottom be in competition with unskilled migrants because it will lead to more poverty, more disharmony and more pressure on the living wage.

    Britain needs to have a controlled immigration system wherein skilled workers come to the UK to fill genuine shortages in the economy. There is never a shortage of unskilled work, and therefore it should go to the unemployed who already reside in this country.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    From an economic perspective, taking in cheap labour from Eastern Europe is certainly a plus to the economy. However, the UK has a living wage for a reason as it allows all people to live above the poverty line. We shouldn't let those at the bottom be in competition with unskilled migrants because it will lead to more poverty, more disharmony and more pressure on the living wage.

    Britain needs to have a controlled immigration system wherein skilled workers come to the UK to fill genuine shortages in the economy. There is never a shortage of unskilled work, and therefore it should go to the unemployed who already reside in this country.
    Unfortunately, your last point isn't completely true. There are low-skilled jobs which the British people simply won't do. There was a recent article on the BBC (which I annoyingly can't find now) in which the chairman of a group of farmers described how reduced immigration from Eastern Europe would negatively impact their workforce. It was Latvians and Poles who signed up to pick fruits, not the Brits.
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    Unfortunately, your last point isn't completely true. There are low-skilled jobs which the British people simply won't do. There was a recent article on the BBC (which I annoyingly can't find now) in which the chairman of a group of farmers described how reduced immigration from Eastern Europe would negatively impact their workforce. It was Latvians and Poles who signed up to pick fruits, not the Brits.
    This is nonsense. The reason that farmers struggle to find work is because the people that need work don't live in affluent rural villages where employment is needed. Maybe we should be talking about improving geographical mobility as oppose to resorting to cheap migration. The unemployed don't refuse to do farm-work because they're too good for it, but because of geographical restrictions which makes travelling to and from the aforesaid farms unrealistic and too expensive.
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    (Original post by welshiee)
    There won't be. The Tory Eurosceptics would be appeased and the UKIP voters basing their arguments solely on immigration would not gather sufficient support to win another referendum.

    Regardless, I don't want another referendum. I would rather the British government agree an EFTA and bilateral trade agreement with the EU and then move on by saying it was the best decision made in the interests of the people. Another referendum just gives the idiots an opportunity to embarrass the UK further on the world stage. We now need true leaders to step up on the world stage and make themselves known.
    I didn't say I wanted another referendum, I was just asking in general whether there will be a possible situation.
    Like my mother always says - move forward, not back.
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    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)

    The big challenge now is that the Leave movement was a broad church of groups that want different things. I would be generally happy with a Norway/Switzerland style agreement where there was access to the single market or parts of it, in exchange for free or mostly free movement and continuing (but reduced) EU contributions, exemption from the Common Agricultural Policy and Common Fisheries Policy and only having to apply EU standards to products sold in their markets, not to our domestic market.
    .
    I think that is reasonable. Especially for exemption from Fisheries and CAP.

    However, I don't really see what the point of voting out on a democratic deficit. That problem still exists with the EU and being part of the Norway style agreement still means we are subject to the same regulatory process that has a democratic deficit.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    This is nonsense. The reason that farmers struggle to find work is because the people that need work don't live in affluent rural villages where employment is needed. Maybe we should be talking about improving geographical mobility as oppose to resorting to cheap migration. The unemployed don't refuse to do farm-work because they're too good for it, but because of geographical restrictions which makes travelling to and from the aforesaid farms unrealistic and too expensive.
    Not really. If a Pole and a Latvian manage to make it work, then obviously someone in the UK can but choose not to.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    This is nonsense. The reason that farmers struggle to find work is because the people that need work don't live in affluent rural villages where employment is needed. Maybe we should be talking about improving geographical mobility as oppose to resorting to cheap migration. The unemployed don't refuse to do farm-work because they're too good for it, but because of geographical restrictions which makes travelling to and from the aforesaid farms unrealistic and too expensive.
    While geographical mobility may be a factor, you are in denial over the fact that many Brits no longer have the work ethic required to do low-skilled yet difficult manual labour. Young people, especially, consider themselves above this sort of work.

    You also pretend like there isn't any unemployment in rural areas. It is lower than in urban areas, true, but especially in Northern England, youth unemployment in rural areas is actually rather high. These people don't need to spend an exorbitant sum on transport so why aren't they working on farms?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-29251226

    The link above is not the one I wanted and is a couple years old but it gets the message across nicely.
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Not really. If a Pole and a Latvian manage to make it work, then obviously someone in the UK can but choose not to.
    A Pole or a Latvian comes to the UK with no other desire other than to find work. A working class Briton who was born and brought up in a working class community is not in a position to pack up and find work elsewhere, due to economic, social and geographical constraints.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    A Pole or a Latvian comes to the UK with no other desire other than to find work. A working class Briton who was born and brought up in a working class community is not in a position to pack up and find work elsewhere, due to economic, social and geographical constraints.
    Just creating excuses for laziness.

    A Pole comes from another country where the wage is significantly less and then you have Brits complaining about geographical constraints. What a joke.
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    (Original post by BasicMistake)
    While geographical mobility may be a factor, you are in denial over the fact that many Brits no longer have the work ethic required to do low-skilled yet difficult manual labour. Young people, especially, consider themselves above this sort of work.

    You also pretend like there isn't any unemployment in rural areas. It is lower than in urban areas, true, but especially in Northern England, youth unemployment in rural areas is actually rather high. These people don't need to spend an exorbitant sum on transport so why aren't they working on farms?

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-29251226

    The link above is not the one I wanted and is a couple years old but it gets the message across nicely.
    Youth unemployment in rural areas is very ambiguous as many workers lie about whether they're in work or not because they can avoid tax and work in the black economy. It also doesn't consider the financial position of these young people who often don't need to go and find work because they come from affluent backgrounds.

    Whilst I accept young people are more choosy with what work they'll do, the underlining point here was about whether Britons would work in farms as oppose to Eastern European - and the answer is yes. Maybe if we have cheaper accommodation in rural areas and improve infrastructure to the rural economy such as transport and connectivity it would entice more people to pack their bags and leave. The only reason Eastern Europeans take these jobs is because they have the luxury of relocating to anywhere where work is most needed, unlike the working class who often live in close-knit communities.
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    Leave has destroyed our relationship with the EU.

    Congratulations.

    Now we need to deal with the consequences, not have another :dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin::dolphin: referendum.
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    Just creating excuses for laziness.

    A Pole comes from another country where the wage is significantly less and then you have Brits complaining about geographical constraints. What a joke.
    You really are a condescending joke aren't you? You can't possibly argue that the working class don't live in areas which are an unrealistic distance from affluent villages where work is needed. Geographical mobility is a very potent factor and it's quite disturbing you're too stuck up to accept it.

    It's funny because I recognise your profile and you're one of those radical leftists who has labelled and demeaned the working class as stupid and now "lazy". I thought your party supports the benefit system because "those who can work will work", yet once again your hypocrisy is showing. Have more dignity.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    You're intolerant, hateful and totally disgusting. You can tell you're a loner. Go away and get a life. Being a **** on TSR is pathetic.
    :cry2:
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    (Original post by DorianGrayism)
    :cry2:
    You give a bad name to the left.
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    (Original post by FrancisHannah)
    You give a bad name to the left.
    Except ...I am not on the left.
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    (Original post by Squamber)
    Having another EU referendum would be silly. The only people who want to vote again are the Remain supporters - of whom a lot are salty as they had no doubts that the public would vote remain - and the people who voted Leave who are now being scared into thinking that they made the wrong decision by the uncertainty that the future now holds.

    A general election would also be a bad move, in my opinion. What should have happened, is David Cameron shouldn't have jumped ship when the country is in need of stability at such a critical time.

    What we need is someone who will allay the fears of the public and carry them through to the next stage in a calm and efficient way - not a load of people going crazy because they think we're all going to die immediately after separating from the EU.
    Why should he stay, be forced to do something he never wanted and therefore be remembered as the man who caused a whole load of damage to the UK and possibly Europe? Let Boris attempt to sort it all out, take the blame and go down in history as one of the worst PMs we've ever had.
 
 
 
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