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Is driving an automatic easier than a manual? Watch

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    automatics are easier and are the future
    ford has already cut out manual boxes in pick up trucks
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    (Original post by StudyQueen)
    Wanting to learn how to drive fully by the end of this summer, is an automatic car actually easier to drive than a manual one?

    Wondering if it's worth it considering automatic lessons are more expensive.
    I find reversing UP a hill harder in an automatic, but I guess for those that don't like in Yorkshire, you probably don't have that issue

    (Original post by Cascadess)
    I think it's just personal preference from what I hear, you'll get used top whichever, however AND CORRECT ME IF I'M WRONG PEOPLE, but I think if you get a manual license you can drive autos but if you get an auto license you can't drive manuals legally?

    If I'm right I'd recommend the manual lessons
    This is correct. I would also recommend getting the manual lessons, because then you can drive both

    (Original post by Alexion)
    Manual lessons are much better, since you can then drive both shifts after.

    Honestly, it doesn't take long to get the hang of clutch control and gear shifts - it's second nature before you even pass your test (or at least it was for me and should be).

    And considering the fact automatic lessons are more expensive - I don't see the point, really.
    This is true. Also, I never knew that automatic lessons cost more. Maybe because they're "niche" The irony of course is that driving instructors tend to drive Toyota Yaris hybrids which actually are far far better on fuel economy than some of these manual diesels that others drive!

    (Original post by Bonoahx)
    I've always been told that, even if you want to drive an automatic for the rest of your life, you should learn in a manual. We aren't in the US so it's pretty unusual to only learn in an automatic. They are definitely easier to drive, though what would you do if you had to drive a friend's manual car in an emergency, or you are applying for a job where you are given a manual car?

    I would start learning in a manual and if you are having major issues with the clutch then change to automatic. You can re-take the test in a manual car if you want later.
    True, however the future is most definitely about automatic cars. I drove manual until I got this car. As of 2006, every hybrid car you buy is an automaticEvery PHEV is automaticEvery EV car is automaticEvery hydrogen car (Tbf there are only about two, with one more due to be released soon) is automatic.

    In the future every one will drive an automatic car.
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    (Original post by jamesthehustler)
    automatics are easier and are the future
    ford has already cut out manual boxes in pick up trucks
    Tbh for now, I'd recommend going for the manual lessons, because most cars are still manual

    See my comment regarding hybrids, EVs, PHEVs and hydrogen cars
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    True, however the future is most definitely about automatic cars. I drove manual until I got this car. As of 2006, every hybrid car you buy is an automaticEvery PHEV is automaticEvery EV car is automaticEvery hydrogen car (Tbf there are only about two, with one more due to be released soon) is automatic.

    In the future every one will drive an automatic car.
    You're getting a little confused. Electric vehicles (which includes hydrogen fuel cell cars) don't have automatic gearboxes; they don't have a gearboxes at all. Hybrids typically use a variant of continuously variable transmission (CVT) or a dual clutch gearbox, neither of which are particularly closely related to the conventional torque converter based automatic (other than the absence of a clutch pedal).

    Driving in an area with real hills (not the piddly little things you get in Yorkshire ) with a conventional automatic does make me wish I had a manual again though.
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    I personally prefer manual because i feel like i have far more control, i dont know what it is but i just dont like automatics.
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    (Original post by StudyQueen)
    Wanting to learn how to drive fully by the end of this summer, is an automatic car actually easier to drive than a manual one?

    Wondering if it's worth it considering automatic lessons are more expensive.
    My take on this is it is better to have a full license rather than an automatic only license. You never know you might get a job where the pool cars are all manual or if you are suddenly made to use a van to which almost 90% of them in UK are manuals.

    However if you are confident that you would never be required to drive a manual car ever then by all means go for an automatic only license.

    Is it easier to drive an automatic? Absolutely and that is without a doubt that it will be easier to operate.

    Automatics will definitely be the norm in time to come, many buses and lorries are already automatic. Many cars are no longer being made as a manual and in future a manual gearbox will be as common as a car without PAS.
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    (Original post by moment of truth)
    It is much easier to drive an automatic, but it is very useful to learn how to drive a manual.

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    This.

    I enjoy driving my parent's automatic cars, but I'm really glad I didn't learn how to drive on one, as I would have been completely stuck when confronted with a manual.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    This.

    I enjoy driving my parent's automatic cars, but I'm really glad I didn't learn how to drive on one, as I would have been completely stuck when confronted with a manual.
    Yeah, ever since I passed my test I have driven an automatic car and can't really see myself going back to a manual now.

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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    You're getting a little confused. Electric vehicles (which includes hydrogen fuel cell cars) don't have automatic gearboxes; they don't have a gearboxes at all. Hybrids typically use a variant of continuously variable transmission (CVT) or a dual clutch gearbox, neither of which are particularly closely related to the conventional torque converter based automatic (other than the absence of a clutch pedal).

    Driving in an area with real hills (not the piddly little things you get in Yorkshire ) with a conventional automatic does make me wish I had a manual again though.
    Yorkshire hills aren't piddly! I mean it does depend on which part of Yorkshire you're in. We have hills that have killed people

    Though fair enough I didn't know that as such. Though as far as the driver is concerned, they're driving an "automatic" car no?

    I guess mines not a "conventional" automatic. But yes for an older car manuals are great. You do get better fuel economy on more "modern" automatics these days though
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    (Original post by Alfissti)
    My take on this is it is better to have a full license rather than an automatic only license. You never know you might get a job where the pool cars are all manual or if you are suddenly made to use a van to which almost 90% of them in UK are manuals.

    However if you are confident that you would never be required to drive a manual car ever then by all means go for an automatic only license.

    Is it easier to drive an automatic? Absolutely and that is without a doubt that it will be easier to operate.

    Automatics will definitely be the norm in time to come, many buses and lorries are already automatic. Many cars are no longer being made as a manual and in future a manual gearbox will be as common as a car without PAS.
    I do think that reversing up a hill to parallel park is easier in a manual. I mean in theory my car can park itself but I haven't quite worked out how to use that feature

    Though also honestly most people aren't really going to have to reverse up a hill!
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    (Original post by moment of truth)
    Yeah, ever since I passed my test I have driven an automatic car and can't really see myself going back to a manual now.

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    What car do you drive out of interestm
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    Obviously automatic would be easier to learn, but it'd be better to learn how to drive a manual car. This way you're able to drive any car, instead of being restricted to driving automatic cars only.
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    (Original post by The_Internet)
    Yorkshire hills aren't piddly! I mean it does depend on which part of Yorkshire you're in. We have hills that have killed people

    Though fair enough I didn't know that as such. Though as far as the driver is concerned, they're driving an "automatic" car no?

    I guess mines not a "conventional" automatic. But yes for an older car manuals are great. You do get better fuel economy on more "modern" automatics these days though
    I live on an island with two peaks reaching almost 14,000', Yorkshire's got nothing on that

    It depends whether you classify a car as 'automatic' solely because it doesn't have a clutch pedal. There are definite changes in driving characteristics between a car with a gearbox (of any variety) and one with direct drive, as you get in an electric car.

    The 'more modern' automatics you mention are generally an automated manual gear box. Conventional automatic gearboxes use a fluid coupling/torque converter in place of the clutch, and a planetary gearing system. Manuals use a friction clutch and spur gears engaged by dog clutches. The good modern automatic gearboxes (certainly the efficient ones) are typically a manual gearbox with computer controlled actuators for the clutch and gear shift, so the power delivery and control is more similar to a manual gearbox. I could go on for ages but the main point is that it's a bit misleading to just use the presence or absence of a clutch pedal to classify a gearbox as manual or automatic - although I realise most people won't care!

    Just as a little side note, most modern tractors have at least three ways of disengaging the clutch (pedal, column mounted shuttle lever and a button on the range change lever) but they retain the pedal as it gives finer control when manoeuvring, or pulling away with a very heavy load.
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    Much easier. I suggest learning to drive a manual car, then its simple to adapt to an automatic car.
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    Yes, but a manual is more involving :yep: You should also learn to drive in a manual car (since you'll then be able to drive both).

    In my current car I've got a semi-automatic gearbox (automatic with paddle shifters) and that's a pretty nice compromise between the two (one that I'd recommend as well).
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    (Original post by CurlyBen)
    I live on an island with two peaks reaching almost 14,000', Yorkshire's got nothing on that

    It depends whether you classify a car as 'automatic' solely because it doesn't have a clutch pedal. There are definite changes in driving characteristics between a car with a gearbox (of any variety) and one with direct drive, as you get in an electric car.

    The 'more modern' automatics you mention are generally an automated manual gear box. Conventional automatic gearboxes use a fluid coupling/torque converter in place of the clutch, and a planetary gearing system. Manuals use a friction clutch and spur gears engaged by dog clutches. The good modern automatic gearboxes (certainly the efficient ones) are typically a manual gearbox with computer controlled actuators for the clutch and gear shift, so the power delivery and control is more similar to a manual gearbox. I could go on for ages but the main point is that it's a bit misleading to just use the presence or absence of a clutch pedal to classify a gearbox as manual or automatic - although I realise most people won't care!

    Just as a little side note, most modern tractors have at least three ways of disengaging the clutch (pedal, column mounted shuttle lever and a button on the range change lever) but they retain the pedal as it gives finer control when manoeuvring, or pulling away with a very heavy load.
    Fine! You win! Yorkshire hills are pretty something for England though!

    And no, I classify an automatic, if you have a "drive" option if you like, instead of gears 1,2,3,4,5 and possibly 6. And tbh I am in that "majority of people who don't care"
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    I really would not recommend learning in an automatic just so you can drive by the end of the summer. In a couple of years the desperation of wanting to pass asap would not have been worth the compromise of limping yourself to an automatic.


    The only time I'd recommend learning in an automatic is if you still significantly struggle with learning to drive after a good few lessons.
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    (Original post by StudyQueen)
    Wanting to learn how to drive fully by the end of this summer, is an automatic car actually easier to drive than a manual one?

    Wondering if it's worth it considering automatic lessons are more expensive.
    Yes. Automatics are getting better and better these days, and I think it's only a matter of time until we end up like the americans - assumed to have an automatic car unless you specifically say otherwise.*

    lol*
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    (Original post by StudyQueen)
    Wanting to learn how to drive fully by the end of this summer, is an automatic car actually easier to drive than a manual one?

    Wondering if it's worth it considering automatic lessons are more expensive.
    Here is the thing though. It is more beneficial to learn how to drive a manual car over an automatic because it helps you better understand how a car functions. In addition to this, you have more control over a manual car in comparison to an automatic car and you will be able to easily drive an automatic car.

    Other than the occasional stall, I personally think that it is easier to drive a manual than it is to drive an automatic - but that is me being me
 
 
 
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