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My dad disapproves of doing Sociology at uni Watch

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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    No there are unemployed maths graduates as well. A good maths graduate will get a job but a bad one will probably lose out to other graduates.
    Of course there are, lazy people won't get the good jobs of course but maths graduates are all extremely bright students; most have to have studied further maths and physics at A-level (the most Academic subjects) and therefore you won't really find a "bad one" because maths is so demanding and challenging thus it's these people who get the jobs in the city.
    Also, other subjects offer the exact same skills are sociology like the data collection and analysis but also supply graduates with more applicable skills to the world of work hence the reason there are a lot more maths graduates employed in a wide range of industries compared to sociology
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    (Original post by J.Page)
    Of course there are, lazy people won't get the good jobs of course but maths graduates are all extremely bright students; most have to have studied further maths and physics at A-level (the most Academic subjects) and therefore you won't really find a "bad one" because maths is so demanding and challenging thus it's these people who get the jobs in the city.
    Also, other subjects offer the exact same skills are sociology like the data collection and analysis but also supply graduates with more applicable skills to the world of work hence the reason there are a lot more maths graduates employed in a wide range of industries compared to sociology
    Studying further maths and naths at uni alone does not make one a prime candidate for the city... Ask the multitude of maths students who have been turned down.

    Really, most academic degrees don't afford people with the necessary skills to do well by themselves. To stand a chance in today's job market, one needs to augment their degrees with experience from extracurriculars and from any work/internship opportunities (in some industries this is the only way to get hired). Ergo, a sociology grad with a pristine CV, a can-do attitude and a great personality will faire very well.



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    (Original post by Ervahy)
    Help! My mother is supportive of me wanting to do Sociology at university but my dad isn't because of the lack of career opportunities. The thing is, apart from perhaps criminal profiling I don't think I'd be good at anything else. Actually, I asked him and his partner last night if they thought I'd be good at that instead after being interested in it for years. They both said no immediately. Please help!
    IGNORE THE LIBERALS, HE IS RIGHT AND THINKING OF YOUR FUTURE, SOCIOLOGY IS A SUBJECTIVE, UNHELPFUL SUBJECT AT BEST, DO SOMETHING THAT WILL HELP YOU!, BY ALL MEANS, DO IT AFTER YOU DO SOMETHING TO GAIN YOU GOOD EMPLOYABILITY IF YOU ENJOY IT, but please think of your future. I hate sociology lmao, read one of the A2 textbooks and thought what a load of ****, don't do it to yourself!
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Studying further maths and naths at uni alone does not make one a prime candidate for the city... Ask the multitude of maths students who have been turned down.

    Really, most academic degrees don't afford people with the necessary skills to do well by themselves. To stand a chance in today's job market, one needs to augment their degrees with experience from extracurriculars and from any work/internship opportunities (in some industries this is the only way to get hired). Ergo, a sociology grad with a pristine CV, a can-do attitude and a great personality will faire very well.



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    Partially to do with the saturation of the job market and encouraging every tom **** and harry to get a degree, and making education easier than historically. I mean come on, 50 percent of school leavers to university isn't a good idea, though high immigration and globalization doesn't help either. So you're right, but I believe it shouldn't be like that, as it makes life harder than what it should. For example I don't even want to go to university really, I am indifferent, but for the sake of future employability I will, I wouldn't have even bothered with gcse's if I didn't have to LMAO
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    (Original post by IronicalMan)
    IGNORE THE LIBERALS, HE IS RIGHT AND THINKING OF YOUR FUTURE, SOCIOLOGY IS A SUBJECTIVE, UNHELPFUL SUBJECT AT BEST, DO SOMETHING THAT WILL HELP YOU!, BY ALL MEANS, DO IT AFTER YOU DO SOMETHING TO GAIN YOU GOOD EMPLOYABILITY IF YOU ENJOY IT, but please think of your future. I hate sociology lmao, read one of the A2 textbooks and thought what a load of ****, don't do it to yourself!
    Define "good employability"?

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Studying further maths and naths at uni alone does not make one a prime candidate for the city... Ask the multitude of maths students who have been turned down.

    Really, most academic degrees don't afford people with the necessary skills to do well by themselves. To stand a chance in today's job market, one needs to augment their degrees with experience from extracurriculars and from any work/internship opportunities (in some industries this is the only way to get hired). Ergo, a sociology grad with a pristine CV, a can-do attitude and a great personality will faire very well.



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    Maths was just an example but there's a reason sociology graduates start on average salary of £17k and economics graduates start on average of £25k, all down to the demand in the labour market.
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    (Original post by Magnus Taylor)
    It's a different career field mate, go lose your v
    :lol:
    :lol:
    :lol:
    :lol:


    That was pathetic.
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    I agree with your father, but it's entirely up to you. If you're seriously interested in a Sociology degree then sign up for it.
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    (Original post by J.Page)
    Maths was just an example but there's a reason sociology graduates start on average salary of £17k and economics graduates start on average of £25k, all down to the demand in the labour market.
    ...it seems you don't know what an average is bro.

    That maths average could be a couple ballers who landed IB, consulting and software gigs then the rest are working in at best semi-skilled work for a small business of some sort. Likewise, the sociology average might be skewed as most sociology grads don't want to work in a job that pays 'highly'. Maybe they go into training for social work? Or they get a research assistant job or they go into entry level recruitment?*

    It's never as clean cut as average salary. *
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    A lot of it's down to the person unless it's a very specialised field.

    I know Arts & Humanties grads who have done well for themselves, along with people who went to ex-polys and other low ranked places who should all be shelf stackers according to TSR.
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    ur dad has a brain
    listen to him
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    (Original post by Raees_Sharif)
    ur dad has a brain
    listen to him
    No. His dad is talking absolute ****. OP should study what he enjoys and is good at and what he feels is best for him/her.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    No. His dad is talking absolute ****. OP should study what he enjoys and is good at and what he feels is best for him/her.
    so he should waste 3 years doing a degree that will leave him with no employable skills.
    ok
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    (Original post by Ervahy)
    Help! My mother is supportive of me wanting to do Sociology at university but my dad isn't because of the lack of career opportunities. The thing is, apart from perhaps criminal profiling I don't think I'd be good at anything else. Actually, I asked him and his partner last night if they thought I'd be good at that instead after being interested in it for years. They both said no immediately. Please help!
    If you wanna do it, do it. That's the thing you gonna study for a few years so you'd better like it or it'd be a waste of time.
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    (Original post by InvestmentBankin)
    PPE Oxford.
    Apply burn to cold area
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    Well it's a good thing that you're studying it and not him.

    If Sociology is something you really want to study at degree, then do it. Don't let anyone get in your way.
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    (Original post by Raees_Sharif)
    so he should waste 3 years doing a degree that will leave him with no employable skills.
    ok
    The degree subject you do does not matter for most jobs. For example, the big accounting firms and investment banks do not care which degree you do as long as the university is good and you possess the right skills like leadership, teamwork and communication skills, which you can demonstrate best through extracurricular activities. Someone with a sociology degree from somewhere like UCL with good extracurriculars and work experience is more likely to get a good job than someone doing an "employable" degree at the same university with little or no work experience or extracurriculars.

    Roughy 70% of graduate jobs don't require a specific degree. This includes most finance, accounting, business, civil service, social care, administrative, HR, PR, sales and marketing jobs. They care far more about the skills you develop through work experience and extracurriculars.

    Pretty much the only careers which a sociology grad can't do are engineering, IT and quantitative finance jobs, which a sociology grad wouldn't want to do anyway. Even medicine can be done if they get into a graduate medicine course.
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    The degree subject you do does not matter for most jobs. For example, the big accounting firms and investment banks do not care which degree you do as long as the university is good and you possess the right skills like leadership, teamwork and communication skills, which you can demonstrate best through extracurricular activities. Someone with a sociology degree from somewhere like UCL with good extracurriculars and work experience is more likely to get a good job than someone doing an "employable" degree at the same university with little or no work experience or extracurriculars.

    Roughy 70% of graduate jobs don't require a specific degree. This includes most finance, accounting, business, civil service, social care, administrative, HR, PR, sales and marketing jobs. They care far more about the skills you develop through work experience and extracurriculars.

    Pretty much the only careers which a sociology grad can't do are engineering, IT and quantitative finance jobs, which a sociology grad wouldn't want to do anyway. Even medicine can be done if they get into a graduate medicine course.
    I'm amazed most people don't know this yet.

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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    No. His dad is talking absolute ****. OP should study what he enjoys and is good at and what he feels is best for him/her.
    Just to let you all know, I'm a female...
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    (Original post by Ervahy)
    Just to let you all know, I'm a female...
    Ok
 
 
 
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