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The Trolley Problem watch

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    Don't think I'd be strong enough to push the fat man off the bridge lol
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    (Original post by M451)
    Sorry, what have I missed?
    The fact that we question a moral problem of sacrificing 1 existence to save 5, not the technical ability do something in specific situation.
    But now I see, that maybe I missed that the second example questions not only the moral problem, but also psychological factor.


    That's a miss:
    (Original post by Pinkberry_y)
    Don't think I'd be strong enough to push the fat man off the bridge lol
    But I take it was deliberate.
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    The fact that we question a moral problem of sacrificing 1 existence to save 5, not the technical ability do something in specific situation.
    But now I see, that maybe I missed that the second example questions not only the moral problem, but also psychological factor.


    That's a miss:

    But I take it was deliberate.
    As in I'm too physically weak to have the strength to push all the tonnes of his weight off a bridge
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    The fact that we question a moral problem of sacrificing 1 existence to save 5, not the technical ability do something in specific situation.
    But now I see, that maybe I missed that the second example questions not only the moral problem, but also psychological factor.


    That's a miss:

    But I take it was deliberate.

    Really the question can be taken as far as you want it. Risk and uncertainty are factors that will affect the final decision.
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    (Original post by M451)
    Really the question can be taken as far as you want it. Risk and uncertainty are factors that will affect the final decision.
    There was no data in that matter provided, and the question was:
    "Is it permissible to throw the switch, killing one man to save five."
    This clearly means that there are only two options possible, no risk factor possible. Why do you take into count factors which are not existant in discussed problem?

    (Original post by Pinkberry_y)
    As in I'm too physically weak to have the strength to push all the tonnes of his weight off a bridge
    But this is like building a house from a flat jigsaw.
    If you worked in a shop, and was ordered to "get rid of the mess in storage" would throw everything to rubbish bin, build a castle of boxes and cans, or would you realize that it is required to put things in some very one correct order?
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    (Original post by PTMalewski)
    There was no data in that matter provided, and the question was:
    "Is it permissible to throw the switch, killing one man to save five."
    This clearly means that there are only two options possible, no risk factor possible. Why do you take into count factors which are not existant in discussed problem?
    I was referring to the second scenario:
    "Consider a different scene. You are on a bridge overlooking the tracks and have spotted the runaway trolley bearing down on the five workers. Now the only way to stop the trolley is to throw a heavy object in its path. And the only heavy object within reach is a fat man standing next to you. Should you throw the man off the bridge?"


    A heavy object could stop the trolley and the fat man is described as a heavy object, but still there is no mention that he can certainly stop the trolley.
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    (Original post by M451)


    A heavy object could stop the trolley and the fat man is described as a heavy object, but still there is no mention that he can certainly stop the trolley.
    The only parameter given in this example is "heavy". "Heavy" is the condition required to stop the trolley. So according to given data, the fat man certainly will stop the trolley. Anything else is overinterpretation, and would massively fail in understanding philosophical problems according to particular systems, as well as understanding matchematical prolems. This is the same as using made up input in calculations on possible behaviour of real objects.
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    push the fat man off of the bridge after the train runs over the five men
 
 
 
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