Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Should Boris Johnson and Michael Gove be prosecuted? Watch

    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I'm just really sorry that you lack the ability to comprehend a fairly simple post.

    It isn't about not getting the result I wanted. It is about that fact that the Leave campaign told a number of fairly big lies. Were told that they were telling lies. Yet still told those lies.

    An expert on the matter is of a view that this could, in theory, constitute a criminal offence.

    If this is the case, I'd be all for the perpetrators getting their comeuppance. I'd say the same for any other politician who did the same for any other cause.*
    Except the whole first statement the article goes on about was NEVER ****ING SAID. So it wouldn't hold up in a court of law. Another stupid expert talking out of their butt-hole.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Along with other key figures in Vote Leave?

    An argument has been put forward that, given some claims by Vote Leave were clearly incorrect, the offence of misconduct in public office may have been committed.

    This article explains more. *

    I for one would be happy to see the likes of Johnson and Gove held to account for the deceitful nature off their campaign.
    Gove was a minister of the crown when telling all those porkies.

    Perhaps a trial before the bar of the Commons quickly followed by imprisonment in the Clock Tower for an indefinite period on bread and water would be appropriate.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Prosecution may be on the severe end of the scale, but do you think there should be any repercussions for telling lies while holding public office?
    I think you'll struggle to find much of an objective standard of truth in politics.

    Also most political "lies" are not, in fact, lies in the technical sense, but simply ********. Essentially that grey space of misdirection, questionable assertions, cunning ambiguities and euphemisms. A half-way decent politician should never have to outright lie.

    Things like the £350 million a week claim for example were not objectively false as such, they were simply nonsense. An unrepresentative figure taking from cooking things towards a particular slant. Not falsifiable as such, but far from the truth.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Studentus-anonymous)
    Should you be regarded as a bit of a muppet?
    I at least hope you're trolling.

    Seriously. Step back and look at what you just said:

    "Waaa I didn't get the outcome I wanted from the referendum, so we should totes prosecute the leaders of the opposing position's campaign for injury to my feels." (Paraphrased)

    If you don't see it then my sympathies and a ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
    If you can't comprehend why lying in a political campaign is wrong (and would be illegal under general election rules), you're the muppet.
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Along with other key figures in Vote Leave?An argument has been put forward that, given some claims by Vote Leave were clearly incorrect, the offence of misconduct in public office may have been committed.This article explains more. *I for one would be happy to see the likes of Johnson and Gove held to account for the deceitful nature off their campaign.
    You would essentially be prosecuting them for exaggeration, which is a worrying precedent to set. The public were fully able to find out what the actual, net figure is. Yes, it was a shady tactic, but we should not be prosecuting people for exaggerated advertising which has drawn in those who are ignorant and too lazy to research the reality.

    I do tire of this attitude in society of trying to use the criminal law to solve all our problems.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    You would essentially be prosecuting them for exaggeration, which is a worrying precedent to set. The public were fully able to find out what the actual, net figure is. Yes, it was a shady tactic, but we should not be prosecuting people for exaggerated advertising which has drawn in those who are ignorant and too lazy to research the reality.

    I do tire of this attitude in society of trying to use the criminal law to solve all our problems.
    Not to mention that if we start sentencing politicians for broken manifesto promises (although the Leave campaign never promised anything, as frequently said by Remainers who said there was no plan for Brexit), then that is effectively every government facing prison time/hefty fines since forever.
    An appealing prospect I'm sure, but ultimately a wasteful and impractical one.

    OP is just proposing vindictive punishment for disappointment. Either trolling or being daft.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by L i b)
    Things like the £350 million a week claim for example were not objectively false as such, they were simply nonsense. An unrepresentative figure taking from cooking things towards a particular slant. Not falsifiable as such, but far from the truth.
    How about saying that the UK doesn't have a veto over Turkey joining the EU?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Boris should be prosecuted for doing nothing to improve London's air quality whilst Mayor.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I'm just really sorry that you lack the ability to comprehend a fairly simple post.

    It isn't about not getting the result I wanted. It is about that fact that the Leave campaign told a number of fairly big lies. Were told that they were telling lies. Yet still told those lies.

    An expert on the matter is of a view that this could, in theory, constitute a criminal offence.

    If this is the case, I'd be all for the perpetrators getting their comeuppance. I'd say the same for any other politician who did the same for any other cause.*
    And remain didn't tell lies?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by joecphillips)
    And remain didn't tell lies?
    I certainly don't remember people like the National Audit Office, or Treasury Select Committees jumping up and down as much about things Remain said.

    And I think that is what set's Leave's lies apart. Rather than broken manifesto promises or slight over exaggerations, things like the £350m and Turkey veto were fairly black and white. They weren't true - and despite being told off for saying these things, Leave carried on with the deceit. *
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I certainly don't remember people like the National Audit Office, or Treasury Select Committees jumping up and down as much about things Remain said.
    So they should be allowed to mislead the public in the same way leave did as long as people at the top don't complain about them?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I certainly don't remember people like the National Audit Office, or Treasury Select Committees jumping up and down as much about things Remain said.

    And I think that is what set's Leave's lies apart. Rather than broken manifesto promises or slight over exaggerations, things like the £350m and Turkey veto were fairly black and white. They weren't true - and despite being told off for saying these things, Leave carried on with the deceit. *
    Having a veto and using it are 2 different things, we have people in turkey helping them join the eu.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/world/...embassy-ankara
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by joecphillips)
    So they should be allowed to mislead the public in the same way leave did as long as people at the top don't complain about them?
    I never said that.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    I certainly don't remember people like the National Audit Office, or Treasury Select Committees jumping up and down as much about things Remain said.

    And I think that is what set's Leave's lies apart. Rather than broken manifesto promises or slight over exaggerations, things like the £350m and Turkey veto were fairly black and white. They weren't true - and despite being told off for saying these things, Leave carried on with the deceit. *
    For me, the thing that really marks this campaign out as unusually outrageous is that a crucial national decision that affects the economy and security in all kinds of ways received major and persistent lies from government ministers who then went on to cheerfully admit that they had lied.

    I think there needs to be a process of popular impeachment for government ministers. Clearly we are not being well served by them in general and that goes back to New Labour as well.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    For me, the thing that really marks this campaign out as unusually outrageous is that a crucial national decision that affects the economy and security in all kinds of ways received major and persistent lies from government ministers who then went on to cheerfully admit that they had lied.

    I think there needs to be a process of popular impeachment for government ministers. Clearly we are not being well served by them in general and that goes back to New Labour as well.
    That is one thing I think we can agree on, the people are not being well served by MPs.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    And the Remain campaign painted a picture of the UK becoming like Dawn of The Dead or a 24/7 version of The Purge in the event of a Brexit...............
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by KimKallstrom)
    And the Remain campaign painted a picture of the UK becoming like Dawn of The Dead or a 24/7 version of The Purge in the event of a Brexit...............
    Well, there has been many negative effects. And we haven't yet left - so it is too early to tell what life will be like after the EU. Remain may well be correct.

    The statements Leave made - the ones I'm talking about anyway - were just wrong.*
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Along with other key figures in Vote Leave?

    An argument has been put forward that, given some claims by Vote Leave were clearly incorrect, the offence of misconduct in public office may have been committed.

    This article explains more. *

    I for one would be happy to see the likes of Johnson and Gove held to account for the deceitful nature off their campaign.
    Nobody broke the law. Making empty promises is not illegal. Get over it.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Josb)
    Nobody broke the law. Making empty promises is not illegal. Get over it.
    This thread isn't about empty promises. It is about a number of statements made by the Leave campaign which were presented as statements of fact.

    *
    Offline

    5
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    This thread isn't about empty promises. It is about a number of statements made by the Leave campaign which were presented as statements of fact.

    *
    Of which the public had ample opportunity to research and find out the reality.

    Should Theresa May have been arrested when she made the factually inaccurate statement that an illegal immigrant avoided deportation because of his pet cat?

    IMO, this should only be criminal when the public office holder has a monopoly on the facts, i.e. if a government minister forced his department to produce misleading figures on levels of crime, which the public could not check through other sources.
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
    Useful resources

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.