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    I did 5 AS Levels this year, so I feel like I could give some input into the topic. if you feel like you can handle the workload, then do it. You seem like a very bright individual so you probably could deal with all of the work. Keeping on top of stuff like homework was probably the hardest thing for me this year but understanding the topics in my subjects were fine throughout the year. However, I would only recommend doing 5 AS Levels if you enjoy the subjects, not just because you want to look better for uni applications. Cambridge only really care about the UMS in your three best subjects so apart from demonstrating time management skills, which can be achieved by much simpler methods, there's honestly no real advantage to doing 5 AS Levels.

    I must reiterate this point. ONLY DO 5 AS LEVELS IF YOU REALLY ENJOY THE SUBJECTS!
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    I did Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Maths and Further Maths, incase you were wondering.
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    There's really no point. The likelihood of you getting A's in all of them is very very very slim. How are you going to physically have enough time to revise for that much subjects and ensure you put maximum effort into each one. You won't.
    I started off doing 5 alevels thinking I could handle it. I ended up dropping out of biology after getting a U in the mock because I could never find the time to revise for it. It was a complete waste of time and I don't recommend it whatsoever. You're better off going 3 subjects cause unis only want 3 grades at the end of the day.
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    (Original post by nobodycarescarla)
    My mate got into oxford with 3, but she got 100ums (100%) in 2 of them! Think more quality over quantity.
    I know someone in the year above who did 8 (yes really!) and achieved something like 4A*s and 4As and got rejected by cambridge and went ucl instead for chemistry. So Alevels arent everything. May not be worth putting yourself through extra Alevels as there is a chance you wont get into oxbridge (sorry if that sounds harsh but they do have a high rejection rate, but thats a disscussion for another day).
    Best of luck regardless!
    UMS makes no difference to Oxford as they do not ask to see this
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    Most people I've seen on here who took 5 A-levels got something like AABCC. Honestly, they've shot themselves in the foot by doing that, thinking that it would make them stand out and they could handle it.

    I would say try 5 AS-levels. After the first month, drop to four if you are not doing as well as you could. Definitely drop one after AS though. Yes, even if you get all A's.

    Just remember that you will not give yourself any advantage over people who are doing three. I'm not actually sure why people say you should take more if you can handle it if this is true though.

    Have a look at this guy. He got rejected from Oxford even though he got 7 A*'s. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...niversity.html
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    Do 6 if you want to.
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    Just do 4 maybe even 3...
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    (Original post by yaystrawberries)
    I've just done my GCSEs and am predicted to get A*s in all of them. The four A Levels I've decided on are Maths, Chemistry, Physics and Further Maths. The fifth would either be French or Biology, and I'd drop it after doing the AS Level. My teachers have told me repeatedly that I should consider taking 5 A Levels because they think I can handle the workload - for Maths/FM I've already tried a few of the C1, C2 and FP1 papers and done pretty well in them.
    I want to study Chemical Engineering at university.
    I know this isn't the only thread asking about taking 5 A Levels! But I want to ask anyone on the new specification for the sciences, what the workload is like and if it's doable. What are the advantages of doing 5 (apart from bragging rights)? Even though I found some of the units easy, have I totally underestimated how hard Maths A Level is?
    Where I teach [high performing selective school] we don't allow anyone to do 5 with the new A levels. There is absolutely no benefit - be sensible and take four.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Have a look at this guy. He got rejected from Oxford even though he got 7 A*'s. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...niversity.html
    The lad got into Princeton and Stanford though... way more impressive than Oxford in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    The lad got into Princeton and Stanford though... way more impressive than Oxford in my opinion.
    Ah that's just subjective.

    The point is that doing a lot of A-levels won't necessarily put you at an advantage.
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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    Ah that's just subjective.

    The point is that doing a lot of A-levels won't necessarily put you at an advantage.
    No, I agree - more than 5 A-levels is overkill. I'm just wondering why he got rejected from Oxford if he could get into both Princeton and Stanford. Perhaps it was a bad interview.
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    Firstly, massive well done to you for even being in the position to consider taking five!

    I took 4 AS subjects. At my college, Welsh Baccalaureate is compulsory, and is now graded using the same marking schemes as normal subjects, so it's seen as an A level in its own right. So essentially, I took 5 AS levels. It wasn't horrendously awful, and with appropriate time management it is completely doable, but I honestly don't think it was worth it in hindsight. Universities only look for 3 A levels, so doing 5, or even 4 gives you no advantage over those doing 3. If anything, I'd say it gives us less of an advantage, as with 3 subjects you can split your time effectively between them. With 4/5, you're spread very thinly indeed, and that could mean you'd get 5 average A levels when you could have got 3 outstanding ones.

    Good luck with whatever you decide!
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    Maths, F. maths, Physics and chem are a perfect combo they overlap with each other A LOT. biology and French have no place so it's not just an extra a level it's a whole new topic and I don't think that's a good idea, it's different if you said like you wanted to do F.maths/maths to compliment physics but seriously do the 4 and enjoy your time. Maybe do an EPQ?
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    Thanks everyone for your help! The unanimous answer from virtually everyone I've asked about this has been 'NO! DON'T DO IT!' so I think I'll be sensible and stick to 4

    My reason for wanting to take Bio was that when I go into chem eng I'm looking to go into the biochemical side of it so I thought it might be useful, but I think I'd be better off researching it in my own time rather than doing the A Level. My reason for wanting to take French was that I want to work in a foreign country/for engineering companies knowing a foreign language is attractive, but I guess I can always self study it!

    (Original post by zayn008)
    Maybe do an EPQ?
    I have the opportunity to, so I think I'll do this instead
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    No, I agree - more than 5 A-levels is overkill. I'm just wondering why he got rejected from Oxford if he could get into both Princeton and Stanford. Perhaps it was a bad interview.
    Definitely

    For a given person who applies to all, much more likely to find the person gets an offer from Oxford and not from either Stanford/Princeton, than Princeton/Stanford and not Oxford.
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    (Original post by yaystrawberries)
    I have the opportunity to, so I think I'll do this instead
    Might i suggest you do an EPQ in something biology oriented, I think an EPQ on cancer research will be amazing and will give you a chance to demonstrate your knowledge of the real world and real world issues while also showing your knowledge and interest in biology
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    (Original post by yaystrawberries)
    I've just done my GCSEs and am predicted to get A*s in all of them. The four A Levels I've decided on are Maths, Chemistry, Physics and Further Maths. The fifth would either be French or Biology, and I'd drop it after doing the AS Level. My teachers have told me repeatedly that I should consider taking 5 A Levels because they think I can handle the workload - for Maths/FM I've already tried a few of the C1, C2 and FP1 papers and done pretty well in them.
    I want to study Chemical Engineering at university.
    I know this isn't the only thread asking about taking 5 A Levels! But I want to ask anyone on the new specification for the sciences, what the workload is like and if it's doable. What are the advantages of doing 5 (apart from bragging rights)? Even though I found some of the units easy, have I totally underestimated how hard Maths A Level is?
    I did 5 AS Levels: Maths, Further Maths, Physics, French and Classics (Did general studies as well but no one cares about that sooo) so really quite similar to yours as well as working 16 hours a week and in all honesty, I didn't have much free time but I didn't find it stupidly difficult to keep up with, I came out with AAAAB and dropped Physics and Classics because I realised Maths was for me. I'd therefore say do it if you want to try out a range of subjects so you can find out which ones are your favourite and as long as you're ready to work hard
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    (Original post by zayn008)
    Maths, F. maths, Physics and chem are a perfect combo they overlap with each other A LOT. biology and French have no place so it's not just an extra a level it's a whole new topic and I don't think that's a good idea, it's different if you said like you wanted to do F.maths/maths to compliment physics but seriously do the 4 and enjoy your time. Maybe do an EPQ?
    French and languages in general take a place in any form of education. I studied French, Maths and Further Maths during year 13 and just doing a language hasn't just opened by eyes to other cultures and increased my job prospects, it's developed my mental agility and confidence in communicating with others. It might not seem like it goes with the other choices well, but the skills it provides have been more useful to me than a subject like Physics could ever be.
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Definitely

    For a given person who applies to all, much more likely to find the person gets an offer from Oxford and not from either Stanford/Princeton, then Princeton/Stanford and not Oxford.
    Exactly what I was wondering. Stanford and Princeton are basically the hardest Ivy leagues to get into, so it surprises me that he could get into both and not Oxford.

    Oxford's official acceptance rate is 18% which is just a little higher than most liberal arts colleges
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    Save yourself and don't do that. Not only is it pointless, but it will crush you. I know people who got all A*s at GCSE and then dropped out of a levels.
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    (Original post by Ayman!)
    No, I agree - more than 5 A-levels is overkill. I'm just wondering why he got rejected from Oxford if he could get into both Princeton and Stanford. Perhaps it was a bad interview.
    Could be. Then again, it's no lie that many excellent applicants are rejected from Oxford and Cambridge. I think that a big part of it is luck really, and that some people are there who you think don't deserve it as much as people like that guy who got 7 A*'s, and people are rejected who really ought to have gotten in.
 
 
 
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