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    Is there an option for both? Actually liked my A-Levels.

    Probably would have done IB, if it did not include a foreign language.
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    (Original post by loveleest)
    Filmmaking...
    I did media studies, psychology and ict.
    Extremely pointless. Wish I did an apprenticeship.
    That sounds cool and thanks for replying So if you could go back you'd do an apprenticeship hands-down?
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Would you choose an Apprenticeship or A-levels? I'm in the situation where I should decide and I would welcome any advice or opinions
    I chose A-levels, and I'm sure I still would. I have been offered an apprenticeship rather than going to uni and am sticking to uni! Although experience is essential when getting a job, you can still do this with a degree. Many degrees now are "sandwich courses" where you take a year out in an industry. Also theres great opportunities for work experience when you're doing A-levels.
    I think it depends majorly on the career path you want to take. For example I am doing accounting and thought the degree option was best, but if you wanted to go into engineering an apprenticeship might get you where you want faster.
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    (Original post by TheReader)
    Is there an option for both? Actually liked my A-Levels.

    Probably would have done IB, if it did not include a foreign language.
    On the apprenticeship it would get me a BTEC i think. What A-levels did you do and what jobs are you looking at?
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    I would recommend you do A-levels so you have something to fall back on if things don't go the way you plan. You can always do a level 4 higher apprenticeship after finishing your A-levels and you still have the option to go to uni if you don't like the apprenticeship.
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    (Original post by chloejane330)
    I chose A-levels, and I'm sure I still would. I have been offered an apprenticeship rather than going to uni and am sticking to uni! Although experience is essential when getting a job, you can still do this with a degree. Many degrees now are "sandwich courses" where you take a year out in an industry. Also theres great opportunities for work experience when you're doing A-levels.
    I think it depends majorly on the career path you want to take. For example I am doing accounting and thought the degree option was best, but if you wanted to go into engineering an apprenticeship might get you where you want faster.
    Ah right and I was thinking the same about A-levels and work experience, because I like the idea of being able to try lots of different areas, whereas an Apprenticeship might narrow my options more. However, engineering is where I was going to head, although llike you say, I can still get there with a degree.
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    (Original post by -DarkCodr-)
    I would recommend you do A-levels so you have something to fall back on if things don't go the way you plan. You can always do a level 4 higher apprenticeship after finishing your A-levels and you still have the option to go to uni if you don't like the apprenticeship.
    Right ok, what about if the apprenticeship you have been offered is highly competitive too? And what have been your experiences if you don't mind me asking?
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    If you were given the choice:

    Would you be able to fly at 10mph, or run at 100mph? Now that's a sleepless-night kind of question. Seriously though I can't answer your question without context, if you'd do well at A-levels and a degree from a good university would largely benefit you and your disipline then it's A-levels, others an apprenticeship is the way if the quality of the degree isn't as important and it's just the qualification that is.
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    (Original post by JoeyTr)
    If you were given the choice:

    Would you be able to fly at 10mph, or run at 100mph? Now that's a sleepless-night kind of question. Seriously though I can't answer your question without context, if you'd do well at A-levels and a degree from a good university would largely benefit you and your disipline then it's A-levels, others an apprenticeship is the way if the quality of the degree isn't as important and it's just the qualification that is.
    Basically I've been offered an Engineering apprenticeship condition being GCSE grades (predicted A*s) and that's as much as I can put into context for you
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    That sounds cool and thanks for replying So if you could go back you'd do an apprenticeship hands-down?
    100%absolutely
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Basically I've been offered an Engineering apprenticeship condition being GCSE grades (predicted A*s) and that's as much as I can put into context for you
    An apprenticeship could lead to different positions and career paths than a degree. At the places I have worked at, apprentices have became technicians or draughtsmen. What does the apprenticeship entail, and do you have any idea at the moment about what you're looking for in a career?
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Basically I've been offered an Engineering apprenticeship condition being GCSE grades (predicted A*s) and that's as much as I can put into context for you
    Interesting, which disipline? I've just finished my A-levels and have accepted an unconditional offer to study Mechanical Engineering at Imperial starting October after getting A*A*A*A or A*A*A*A* this year (Predicted 4, will probably get 3). If you want to get to the highest levels internationally and make the biggest differences you'll almost certainly have to go through a very good university, but it is extremely difficult and requires incredible dedication. If you're not interested in the international scene and you're quite happy focusing on making money, and a fair bit of it, then an apprentice will definitely suit better. All up to your ultimate goal and your levels of sacrifice and dedication.
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Ah right and I was thinking the same about A-levels and work experience, because I like the idea of being able to try lots of different areas, whereas an Apprenticeship might narrow my options more. However, engineering is where I was going to head, although llike you say, I can still get there with a degree.
    if you want to become an accredited engineer, then you would need to get an MEng degree.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    An apprenticeship could lead to different positions and career paths than a degree. At the places I have worked at, apprentices have became technicians or draughtsmen. What does the apprenticeship entail, and do you have any idea at the moment about what you're looking for in a career?
    Well I think they keep on most of their apprentices in employment after the time, and either in Technician or craftsmen roles. I always liked the idea of being an engineer, although I'm open to trying anything kind of science related, so I guess I am undecided

    (Original post by JoeyTr)
    Interesting, which disipline? I've just finished my A-levels and have accepted an unconditional offer to study Mechanical Engineering at Imperial starting October after getting A*A*A*A or A*A*A*A* this year (Predicted 4, will probably get 3). If you want to get to the highest levels internationally and make the biggest differences you'll almost certainly have to go through a very good university, but it is extremely difficult and requires incredible dedication. If you're not interested in the international scene and you're quite happy focusing on making money, and a fair bit of it, then an apprentice will definitely suit better. All up to your ultimate goal and your levels of sacrifice and dedication.
    Wow well done on your offer (what A-levels did you take?) and those grades are amazing!! As of yet I've never been abroad and don't know if it is something I want to do, but what I do want is to have a careeer with lots of opportunity, as some people have said the apprenticeship may limit my chances to progress, although this has been disputed.

    (Original post by TheReader)
    if you want to become an accredited engineer, then you would need to get an MEng degree.
    Is the only way to do that by going to college and then uni, or can I get it through an Apprenticeship?
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Well I think they keep on most of their apprentices in employment after the time, and either in Technician or craftsmen roles. I always liked the idea of being an engineer, although I'm open to trying anything kind of science related, so I guess I am undecided



    Wow well done on your offer (what A-levels did you take?) and those grades are amazing!! As of yet I've never been abroad and don't know if it is something I want to do, but what I do want is to have a careeer with lots of opportunity, as some people have said the apprenticeship may limit my chances to progress, although this has been disputed.



    Is the only way to do that by going to college and then uni, or can I get it through an Apprenticeship?
    yes. Check the eligibility section on this website:*http://www.engc.org.uk/ceng
    Also, you can do an internship during your time at university.*
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Well I think they keep on most of their apprentices in employment after the time, and either in Technician or craftsmen roles. I always liked the idea of being an engineer, although I'm open to trying anything kind of science related, so I guess I am undecided
    If you go the apprenticeship -> technician/craftsman, you can always go to university later if you're undecided, but if you go to university I don't think it's likely that you will be recruited into an apprenticeship programme to then become a technician or craftsman. Of course, this doesn't matter that much if you plan on becoming an engineer anyway, and there are some overlaps between the two in areas in manufacturing.

    Ultimately from what I have seen, there is more opportunity to progress with the degree/engineering route, although this is also dependent on how the company is structured, too. (For example, the first company I worked at after graduation had separate functions for manufacturing, quality, engineering etc. and I think it was possible for technicians to progress up within manufacturing without doing the degree route [although people with degree routes were slotted into higher than entry level positions in this function], but don't hold me to that as I wasn't directly involved in that area.)
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Would you choose an Apprenticeship or A-levels? I'm in the situation where I should decide and I would welcome any advice or opinions
    It depends on whether you are practically skilled or mentally skilled. To explain if you are good at subjects in school like Maths or English or History, then A-levels would be the better option for you, if you are good at the actual manual work e.g. building then apprenticeships are possibly the better option. There are pros and cons to both: With an apprenticeship you limit the jobs you can go into and will likely be doing the same thing for the rest of your working life but you start getting payed straight away. With a further education you can discover other jobs and get better payed jobs with less experience, but you only get a proper paying job after you study for the courses. So really if you can do stuff with your hands but find it harder to do the write up or maths then an apprenticeship is better but if you find the writing up or maths the easy part then an education would be the better option for you.
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    Well I think they keep on most of their apprentices in employment after the time, and either in Technician or craftsmen roles. I always liked the idea of being an engineer, although I'm open to trying anything kind of science related, so I guess I am undecided


    Wow well done on your offer (what A-levels did you take?) and those grades are amazing!! As of yet I've never been abroad and don't know if it is something I want to do, but what I do want is to have a careeer with lots of opportunity, as some people have said the apprenticeship may limit my chances to progress, although this has been disputed.



    Is the only way to do that by going to college and then uni, or can I get it through an Apprenticeship?
    You can get an MEng through an apprenticeship but it will take a much longer time and will not be from a top university, but it will be an MEng so you'll be able to get CEng, and it'll cost you less via apprenticeship.

    I did maths, further maths (+M3/M4), physics and chemistry; the one that could be an A is chemistry due to doing the whole A-Level (AS and A2) in one year this year, the other three are sound. To keep most opportunities open for yourself it would have to university for the simple fact that it's much easy to do A-levels then a top Uni then a form of apprenticeship, than an apprenticeship and then a top Uni, and a good degree from a top uni will give you profound opportunities. But it also depends upon the level you operate at and the kind of things you wish to achieve in the long and short term. If you're very good academically and not too materialistic then a top uni will be better, and if you want to start working and making money and get into the thick of it quickly then an apprenticeship is best.
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    (Original post by brainzistheword)
    I love those subjects too - I'm looking at Engineering (that is where I have been offered an Apprenticeship) although I'm still also looking at keeping my options open



    Yes some do, though luckily the one I have been offered goes as far back as GCSE entry so I have been offered it based on that. What careers are you looking at and I bet you wouldn't be fired on the first day (maybe the second ) jk



    Ah it's ok, just curious. Yeah I guess most do, as it is probably because they didn't want to study that most chose an Apprenticeship in the first place.

    Interesting! I have an interest towards Chemical Engineering actually! It looks really cool a course but then yeah, I have to wait until results and then I'll get a much clearer pic on whether I should opt for engineering or not! A levels are quite unpredictable tbh.
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    Depends on the career you seek; I would always choose A Levels as my ideal degree & career is not something I would develop via an apprenticeship.
 
 
 
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