Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

mental health: what do you think? Watch

    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Also some doctors can appear quite cold-hearted. It's like they have a hidden financial incentive to push certain brands of SSRIs. Barely 2 minutes into the appointment as you're trying to explain everything and panicking at the same time, and you're prescribed SSRIs like candy! Done. Close the door on your way out. Next!

    Although if you keep at it, it can build up your confidence until you put your foot down and get them to listen for a change. And you realise that you can switch doctors, and become adamant that you want to try alternative forms of treatments instead of yet another SSRI zombie pill full of side-effects and a 6 week waiting period - no thanks, it's a problem now, your initial behaviour has destroyed any possibility of a placebo effect, so give me something that will relieve the symptoms within the hour. There, now we have an understanding, cya in a month for a refill. Result? Presentations are no longer a problem, social situations are no longer a problem, panic doesn't exist anymore, anxiety is becoming a distant memory. No breathing problems, no trembling, no high BP, no palpitations... simply bliss.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    It's not funded anywhere near enough. 25% of us experience some sort of mental illness in our lifetime and it only roughly gets around 10-12% of the NHS budget. This shows the disparity between how much funding mental health trusts need and the funding they actually get.
    • #2
    #2

    I think the current system, from what I have experienced, is awful.
    I am presenting this from a young person's perspective.

    SH and suicide discussion
    Spoiler:
    Show
    I think there needs to be less stigma around mental health and I think it is a must to stop making mental health something that is "cool", I am certainly finding that more younger and vulnerable teens are starting to think it's cool to self harm, as it is a stereotype of alternate culture, many young girls think self harming is harmless and just something that should be celebrated.
    I also think people need to be more educated on mental health, I think more support should be offered in school's, as not a lot of young people are educated enough on mental health.

    One of my opinions surrounding mental health that is controversial is the fact I think that 'overdosing' should be spoken about in schools. Personally, I have been through an overdose and if I had been educated, I would have never done it. Overdosing is the first attempt a lot of young people make to escape their problems, and this is a big issue. Overdosing is dangerous. Overdosing also does nothing, unless it's on alochol or drugs. I think young people need to be more educated on the effects of all of this harm.


    Personally, I think one of the big steps that needs to be taken in helping the issue of mental health is education and more support.

    Education is really key in areas such as this.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Also some doctors can appear quite cold-hearted. It's like they have a hidden financial incentive to push certain brands of SSRIs. Barely 2 minutes into the appointment as you're trying to explain everything and panicking at the same time, and you're prescribed SSRIs like candy! Done. Close the door on your way out. Next!

    Although if you keep at it, it can build up your confidence until you put your foot down and get them to listen for a change. And you realise that you can switch doctors, and become adamant that you want to try alternative forms of treatments instead of yet another SSRI zombie pill full of side-effects and a 6 week waiting period - no thanks, it's a problem now, your initial behaviour has destroyed and possibility of a placebo effect, so give me something that will relieve the symptoms within the hour. There, now we have an understanding, cya in a month for a refill.
    I'm going to the doctors tomorrow, the same doctor that dismissed me the first time, narrowed everything down to exam stress. Well my exams are now over...

    Ugh I am panicking already, I don't want her to turn me away with pills or something. Best case scenario is to be referred to some sort of counselling
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Also some doctors can appear quite cold-hearted. It's like they have a hidden financial incentive to push certain brands of SSRIs. Barely 2 minutes into the appointment as you're trying to explain everything and panicking at the same time, and you're prescribed SSRIs like candy! Done. Close the door on your way out. Next!

    Although if you keep at it, it can build up your confidence until you put your foot down and get them to listen for a change. And you realise that you can switch doctors, and become adamant that you want to try alternative forms of treatments instead of yet another SSRI zombie pill full of side-effects and a 6 week waiting period - no thanks, it's a problem now, your initial behaviour has destroyed and possibility of a placebo effect, so give me something that will relieve the symptoms within the hour. There, now we have an understanding, cya in a month for a refill. Result? Presentations are no longer a problem, social situations are no longer a problem, panic doesn't exist anymore, anxiety is becoming a distant memory. No breathing problems, no trembling, no high BP, no palpitations... simply bliss.
    Strangely - and this might just be a N.Ireland thing - but there GPs don't prescribe antidepressants etc, or even alter the prescription. It was certainly the case in my home city anyway. Any mental health medication had to be decided by a psychiatrist or a CPN, the GP were only there as a place to pick up the prescription.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I'm going to the doctors tomorrow, the same doctor that dismissed me the first time, narrowed everything down to exam stress. Well my exams are now over...

    Ugh I am panicking already, I don't want her to turn me away with pills or something. Best case scenario is to be referred to some sort of counselling
    Edited my post. You've gotta be firm with them about exploring all options.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Airmed)
    Strangely - and this might just be a N.Ireland thing - but there GPs don't prescribe antidepressants etc, or even alter the prescription. It was certainly the case in my home city anyway. Any mental health medication had to be decided by a psychiatrist or a CPN, the GP were only there as a place to pick up the prescription.
    Not sure about that, could be. In England and Wales though you can get it changed, but it's a lot easier to do this if you're still at the same surgery - if you move to a different practice, and they retrieve your medical records, they will only prescribe you what was on there previously - but there's still a way around that too, it's just that a lot of people with certain types of mental health don't like confrontations and are vulnerable, which is perfectly understandable, but some doctors will listen to you and be open to change depending on how you present it. And if not, you can switch doctors.

    As for prescribing antidepressants in the first place, I'm pretty sure that doctors do prescribe it as I've lost count how many times this was done to me across different cities and practices.

    In England and Wales, seeing a psychiatrist usually only happens if the doctor refers you - it's not very common in most cases though I don't think. But if you do manage to reach that stage, psychiatrists pretty much have limitless authority on what they wish to prescribe you (a cocktail of scheduled medicine that would alarm pharmacists and prompt for an ID check; I believe one of my uni mates had this encounter many years ago at uni ).

    Regarding prescriptions, the doctors can make it a monthly repeat. So each month you just go collect your script from the reception then head on over to the pharmacy. This is typically only after you can be trusted enough with your current treatment plan.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Not sure about that, could be. In England and Wales though you can get it changed, but it's a lot easier to do this if you're still at the same surgery - if you move to a different practice, and they retrieve your medical records, they will only prescribe you what was on there previously - but there's still a way around that too, it's just that a lot of people with certain types of mental health don't like confrontations and are vulnerable, which is perfectly understandable, but some doctors will listen to you and be open to change depending on how you present it. And if not, you can switch doctors.

    As for prescribing antidepressants in the first place, I'm pretty sure that doctors do prescribe it as I've lost count how many times this was done to me across different cities and practices.

    In England and Wales, seeing a psychiatrist usually only happens if the doctor refers you - it's not very common in most cases though I don't think. But if you do manage to reach that stage, psychiatrists pretty much have limitless authority on what they wish to prescribe you (a cocktail of scheduled medicine that would alarm pharmacists and prompt for an ID check; I believe one of my uni mates had this encounter many years ago at uni ).
    In Scotland it can be done also, according to my SO. However when I was on yet another drug back in December and January, my GP in Scotland was extremely wary of taking me off it when it was clearly doing me no good; but this could be because of my diagnosis, which is why she probably told me to wait until I saw my CPN.

    Again, in N.I and Scotland, can only see a psychiatrist if referred by the doctor. I see mine in Scotland every 3/4 months for between 10-20 minutes. :rolleyes: With my diagnosis that is simply unacceptable but the health board I am situated in is desperately struggling.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Airmed)
    In Scotland it can be done also, according to my SO. However when I was on yet another drug back in December and January, my GP in Scotland was extremely wary of taking me off it when it was clearly doing me no good; but this could be because of my diagnosis, which is why she probably told me to wait until I saw my CPN.
    That's one of the more irritating things about it. You're on the medication, it's crap, but they're reluctant to take you off straight away in part due to any potential withdrawal effects/syndromes, to cover their asses and probably any legal action if the worst should happen.

    Again, in N.I and Scotland, can only see a psychiatrist if referred by the doctor. I see mine in Scotland every 3/4 months for between 10-20 minutes. :rolleyes: With my diagnosis that is simply unacceptable but the health board I am situated in is desperately struggling.
    Yeah pretty much the same in the rest of the UK then. With my situation, it took a long time to come up with anything effective but thankfully I finally had it all resolved towards the end of my uni days. I have tried so many things but eventually settled on a weird combination of medications (no antidepressants!) that involve proton-pump inhibitors, painkillers and benzos. Given such a long history at the uni's medical centre, it was only a few months later that I was permitted repeat prescriptions each month and no longer any need to see the GP.

    Though, when you switch practices, you have to see your new GP at least once for the first time before resuming - it's much easier when the practice mainly caters to elderly people I find, they don't make a fuss about prescriptions as much as uni medical centres do (who seem to think everyone student is a drug addict looking to score which unfortunately is sometimes true though).
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I'm going to the doctors tomorrow, the same doctor that dismissed me the first time, narrowed everything down to exam stress. Well my exams are now over...

    Ugh I am panicking already, I don't want her to turn me away with pills or something. Best case scenario is to be referred to some sort of counselling
    If it happens again, ask to see a male doctor for your next appointment if you want a bit of a change - and when you do, make your case to them and be very firm and confident about what it is you want and don't want - talk about your past experiences if you need to support what you're saying. There's no issues in asking to see a doctor of a particular gender when you ring up, they'll see who's available and try and book you in.

    As long as you're being reasonable, rational and explaining your case properly they will hopefully be more likely to listen to you. Can't really give you any specific tips since I don't know what your situation or history is like.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    That's one of the more irritating things about it. You're on the medication, it's crap, but they're reluctant to take you off straight away in part due to any potential withdrawal effects/syndromes, to cover their asses and probably any legal action if the worst should happen.
    Medication and I don't mix, it seems. :eek:

    Yeah pretty much the same in the rest of the UK then. With my situation, it took a long time to come up with anything effective but thankfully I finally had it all resolved towards the end of my uni days. I have tried so many things but eventually settled on a weird combination of medications (no antidepressants!) that involve proton-pump inhibitors, painkillers and benzos. Given such a long history at the uni's medical centre, it was only a few months later that I was permitted repeat prescriptions each month and no longer any need to see the GP.

    Though, when you switch practices, you have to see your new GP at least once for the first time before resuming - it's much easier when the practice mainly caters to elderly people I find, they don't make a fuss about prescriptions as much as uni medical centres do (who seem to think everyone student is a drug addict looking to score which unfortunately is sometimes true though).
    It's wonderful to hear that you have managed to figure out what is right for you though. I am a long way off that and perhaps will never reach it.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Most gps won't touch medication prescribed by a specialist team. I was prescribed by psychiatrist and they wouldn't do a review of it. I had to go back in to see CPN to get a simple review.

    I know a lot of people of wary of meds but I'm pro medication as a mental health practitioner (who can't prescribe or benefit in any way from people being on them). Medication saves lives and it creates the stability needed to do the deep trauma work. I've personally felt the benefits of finding the right ones and they stopped me being suicidal and hurting myself
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Airmed)
    Medication and I don't mix, it seems. :eek:

    It's wonderful to hear that you have managed to figure out what is right for you though. I am a long way off that and perhaps will never reach it.
    Well, I wouldn't give up. There's no other direction, you just keep moving forwards, stumble every now and then, trip up, fall to your knees and then get back up... sometimes taking the wrong turn at the crossroads in your life, but always eventually to where you need to be. It's a long weird road with strange places along the way. That's all. Just a road that you're travelling along.

    Tbh, it wasn't until after I started working full-time - medication or not - and no longer a student that I began to sort myself out. Everything kinda changes for you at that point, especially the things you never really thought about. Still just a road though, gotta keep moving.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Peer Support Volunteers
    • Clearing and Applications Advisor
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Peer Support Volunteers
    Clearing and Applications Advisor
    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Well, I wouldn't give up. There's no other direction, you just keep moving forwards, stumble every now and then, trip up, fall to your knees and then get back up... sometimes taking the wrong turn at the crossroads in your life, but always eventually to where you need to be. It's a long weird road with strange places along the way. That's all. Just a road that you're travelling along.

    Tbh, it wasn't until after I started working full-time and no longer a student that I began to sort myself out. Everything kinda changes for you at that point, especially the things you never really thought about. Still just a road though, gotta keep moving.
    You lose a bit of hope when both your CPN (who is lovely to me, always honest, and doesn't sugarcoat it) and your (useless) psychiatrist both admit that therapy might make you worse.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Airmed)
    You lose a bit of hope when both your CPN (who is lovely to me, always honest, and doesn't sugarcoat it) and your (useless) psychiatrist both admit that therapy might make you worse.
    It's usually that, or they say that you'll feel worse before it starts working, and when you see them next again and it still isn't doing anything, they'll want to up your dose even though the side-effects are going to be unbearable etc. etc. after that you begin doing your own research, switching doctors, getting different opinions and then taking direction of your life. There's many forms of therapy, there's many forms of diet, supplements, herbal extracts, exercises and other activities too. You'll never know unless you try. And if it's not working out, you move on. It's a might or might not, whatever - keep moving forwards, plenty more places to visit along the road. You're sensible enough to know how to play it safe as well.
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    Study Helper
    I think GPs need to have a greater understand of mentall illness especially in teenagers and how the role of social media puts pressure on younger people.

    GPs will often prescribe the most popular anti-depressants and let you go on your merry way, not really caring about your state of mind or what's triggered it and so forth. To have a questionnaire to determine whether you need anti-depressants is ridiculous. Yes, GPs don't have specialist training like Psychiatrists, but a piece of paper should not be a prognosis for depression.

    Some GPs care, but because there is a huge strain on GPs, they have no time to find sympathy with patients that suffer from mental illness. They don't have time for people that are silently suffering anymore. It's just a shame.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by shawn_o1)
    Antidepressants as a "last resort" imo, it's well known that therapies and one-to-one support is more effective
    That's quite a damaging notion, to withhold from prescribing antidepressants until it's a last resort. You're just going to create many more "last resorts".

    Combined therapy has been shown to be by far the most effective. So I don't know where you got that from anyway.
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    What do I think of mental health?

    It's ruined my life.
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    I got a message saying that the thread is being approved but when I check the location of the post, I see it under a section called recycle bin (support area -> recycle bin) which is a post that I made here..

    By the way, can I get an approval for posting the link here?

    (Original post by Derickjones016)
    Spoiler Actually, if you read that story, it's about a personal issue that he has gone through and then he has written an article to let others know about his own experience and then he has tried to spread an awareness of the issue. So why TSR doesn't like to post it? One of the links on his article says 50% of them are having college degrees and 12% of them are having post graduate degrees. Therefore, it is good to be aware of these issues somehow, besides my friend is also going through a similar case. Can I get an approval for posting that.

    Much appreciated,

    Derick

    (Original post by Deyesy)
    What do you mean sorry?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I'm going to the doctors tomorrow, the same doctor that dismissed me the first time, narrowed everything down to exam stress. Well my exams are now over...

    Ugh I am panicking already, I don't want her to turn me away with pills or something. Best case scenario is to be referred to some sort of counselling
    Hope you got on well at the doctors today. Let me know how you got on and if you ever want to talk, I'm here :hugs:
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: July 20, 2016
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.