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    The coursework seems broadly similar then

    In case you missed my post at the end of the last page; http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...0&postcount=20
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    I found the step up from GCSE to be what i needed...at GCSE, i was often bored, but i found A level much better - more grammar, tonnes more vocab, I'd say it's definitely worth it. French was always my favourite A level subject by far, I never EVER regretted taking it, unlike all of my other choices. I started GCSE German this year, just to learn a little bit, and have realised just how unchallenging and unsatisfying the GCSE really is.
    But I do think you need to have some sort of natural ability to do languages, and you have to be enthusiastic about doing it. Otherwise, don't bother with it!
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    (Original post by A SoapBubble)
    I found the step up from GCSE to be what i needed...at GCSE, i was often bored, but i found A level much better - more grammar, tonnes more vocab, I'd say it's definitely worth it. French was always my favourite A level subject by far, I never EVER regretted taking it, unlike all of my other choices. I started GCSE German this year, just to learn a little bit, and have realised just how unchallenging and unsatisfying the GCSE really is.
    But I do think you need to have some sort of natural ability to do languages, and you have to be enthusiastic about doing it. Otherwise, don't bother with it!
    It's always about activities and opinions at GCSE which is what makes it boring.
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    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=tzsMxeoxGf8

    Hilarious spoof of Hallo Aus Berlin
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    There is a lot more in-depth study of the culture, as well as more grammar (such as tenses, some show-off constructions and whatnot).
    However, I did find it my most enjoyable A-level and if you have a talent and enthusiasm for language, I recommend it!
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    (Original post by Mathemagician. Funny?)
    It's always about activities and opinions at GCSE which is what makes it boring.
    i know, so boring! although A level is about opinions too, it's just that you know more words and are therefore able to express yourself much better.
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    Yeah, GCSE was boring. It was way too easy for some, way too hard for others, and so you ended up with a very bored and disruptive class.

    My A Level class had me and another girl and it was good. Apart from the other girl was really into the subject and did all the work ridiculously fast and so I felt like a bit of a ****** sometimes, but I got over it.

    Having looked at the Edexcel paper, I can safely say I'm glad I took AQA because it seemed more challenging. However if I'd taken Edexcel I'd probably have gotten full marks on that paper. All the answers where you had to write in German were 1 mark each (and almost all for the English questions) whereas with AQA you had fewer questions but with more marks allocated to each, which I think is harder.

    And also, that Edexcel word limit would have done my head in. Surely it's wrong to penalise you if you write MORE German than is required!
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    (Original post by Karvel)
    http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=tzsMxeoxGf8

    Hilarious spoof of Hallo Aus Berlin
    HALLO AUS BERLIN!!! I REMEMBER THAT!! That really takes me back to yr 8 German...I think I shall watch that video now...

    And it does seem to be a matter of opinion. Some people find that languages come easily to them, and could get an A with no problems. Some did well at GCSE but found the A-Level really challenging. What made me decide not to do French A-Level, although I'm predicted an A* and in the top set, was the course content. With AQA there seemed to be a lot about the environment and stuff which I'd rather not learn about. Although I did nearly choose it. I know someone who's doing 3 language A-Levels (French, German, Spanish) and she's off to Cambridge in october...
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    (Original post by Karvel)
    The answer really depends on the exam-boards - if you're doing Edexcel then it won't be so bad, but steer clear of AQA because their GCE MFL specs are VERY hard.
    I've just finished my German A-level this summer. I was on AQA (like crankycaz) and I heard that Edexcel was harder!!! :confused: Last year I got 269/300 and am hoping to get an A overall. I just had a look at that AS paper and it does seem easier than the AQA one; what's with all the 1 mark questions?! BUT someone told me that the speaking exam is really hard and you have to act as an interpreter. Could anyone shed some light on this?
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    (Original post by brown)
    BUT someone told me that the speaking exam is really hard and you have to act as an interpreter. Could anyone shed some light on this?
    that sounds a bit odd...I was OCR, where the oral exam is really just a conversation about a subject that you've chosen and prepared (i did the french resistance during WW2). Quite a nice exam actually....as exams go.

    (Original post by purple-girl)
    With AQA there seemed to be a lot about the environment and stuff which I'd rather not learn about.
    stuff about the environment is actually quite useful - a very boring topic, i agree, but just look at it in terms of learning loads of vocabulary.
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    (Original post by brown)
    I've just finished my German A-level this summer. I was on AQA (like crankycaz) and I heard that Edexcel was harder!!! :confused: Last year I got 269/300 and am hoping to get an A overall. I just had a look at that AS paper and it does seem easier than the AQA one; what's with all the 1 mark questions?! BUT someone told me that the speaking exam is really hard and you have to act as an interpreter. Could anyone shed some light on this?
    Edexcel love their different options - for the A2 Speaking test you do;

    EITHER a 15 minute conversation (4 mins on a topic you've prepared e.g. animal cruelty - doesn't have to link into target culture as this is covered in your Unit 5, and then the rest is on unprepared)

    OR an interpreting test where you have to relay information in the target language and English

    (Most people do the 15 minute conversation, as it requires less 'preparation' with regard to skills than the interpreting.)

    And should I mention that you get those one mark questions at A2 as well? For this years German Unit 6 they even omitted the marks for Quality of Language in the Listening section for the first time ever! (i.e. it was just like the format of the AS but slightly harder text)

    I luff Edexcel <3
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    I think languages are just as hard as any other A-Level subject, only you can't really cram for the exam. You have to practice all of the four skills regularly, and learn vocabulary on a (almost) daily basis. I find the grammar section the most enjoyable of all, but that's me. Maybes I'm just strange:p:
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    I prefered grammar to vocabulary or listening (eugh!): what is faulty, what is "le bon usage" etc.
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    I was pretty lazy with grammar and vocab really. But I think my teacher was brilliant, because I think we ended up subconsciously learning stuff without trying too hard. She gave us loads of grammar books, which I never looked at. And adjectival endings just started to click into place about a month before my A2 exams...I think it's just a time thing, they sunk in after being corrected long enough.
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    (Original post by crankycaz)
    I was pretty lazy with grammar and vocab really. But I think my teacher was brilliant, because I think we ended up subconsciously learning stuff without trying too hard. She gave us loads of grammar books, which I never looked at. And adjectival endings just started to click into place about a month before my A2 exams...I think it's just a time thing, they sunk in after being corrected long enough.
    German language is supposed to be easy, isn't it?
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    Have you taken German?

    The spellings are often easier than in French, but some of the more complex sentences can be quite grammatically difficult. German word order is particularly a pain in the bum when you have 3 different parts of the verb and they each need to go in a certain place.

    And adjectival endings are a pain.

    I'd say it's fairly easy to write German to a crap standard, but if you want to write well in German it's pretty tough.
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    I've done German GCSE and although I have coped with all the word order stuff there, I know it is nothing compared to A-level. Would you say that having finished German A-level that when you write it is more natural. You don't have to think about sending the verb to the end or that the fact if you are with someone that always goes after an expression of time. I don't really have to be think about it now after GCSE but it probably is a lot different to A-level. Are you almost fluent?
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    A-level gets you nowhere near fluent! Why do you think people do degrees in it... :p:
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    (Original post by calcium878)
    A-level gets you nowhere near fluent! Why do you think people do degrees in it... :p:
    Because people really enjoy languages and the culture and so wish to study it further.

    There was a kid in our school a while ago who was supposed to be really good at German and my German teacher said his German was as good as my German teacher's english which is really good.
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    (Original post by calcium878)
    A-level gets you nowhere near fluent! Why do you think people do degrees in it... :p:
    to learn more about the history/culture/lifestyle of the country/countries?
 
 
 

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