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    (Original post by Hamo2509)
    A lot of my friends and family get a little glassy-eyed when I talk about my future plans.
    I kind of want to conquer the world and I don't see why I shouldn't try my hand at anything I fancy. Virtually everyone in my family is a workaholic and I'm no different. In my view, life is too short to not grab by the balls.

    I just want to stand back one day and know I've "made it". So I was wondering, at what point will everyone else consider retiring? Where does your ambition cut off?
    If you are scientifically literate in the major sciences (biology,chemistry,physics) and have a degree in them, then, definitely conquer the world. If not then just please go away because there are already too many dumb politicians. I will consider retiring at the age of 60-70 from the very prestigious job of professor in organic chemistry. My ambition will never cut off, I will survive.
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    After I shadowed one of the top 100 clinical leaders in the UK. I knew I wanted to be where he is someday as well. He has some sort of arcane aura that leaves people in awe.
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    (Original post by KatieBlogger)
    Yes. I have 2 degrees and I'm working towards my 3rd. Something I've learned though - none of it matters. Not honours, titles, money, possessions, degrees.


    I've witnessed people who had everything - particularly wealth and reputation - and I've seen how little it matters if they lose one thing...health. That puts it all into perspective. Kindness is the only thing that matters, ultimately. It's the only thing worth being remembered for...not for your bank balance or degrees - they don't leave a lasting positive impression on people or the world.

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    this is perfectly put. i was similar to the op around 12-18 months ago, ive toned it down, but thats more due to having personal experiences which really put whats important into perspective; putting your personal happiness and mental health on the side in order to strive for a career is dangerous, and people use it as a way to ignore their prevalent health and real life issues, in my experience of similar people.

    gl op, dont forget the important things in life too, lifes amazing
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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    Consider Isaac Newton / Leibnitz with calculus. As a result of their efforts, mathematicians of the time calculated the trajectory of the planets, Isaac was able to deduce the inverse square law of gravity, and we landed on the moon, all within a few hundred years.That's called leaving your mark, and that's way better than any amount of partying. Newton will be remembered, while most the 7 billion of us currently breathing will be forgotten.
    So life is either a case of partying or being a workaholic? How depressing that you should think there's nothing else to obtain from life.

    I see what you mean, but what's being discussed here is different. If people were exclaiming their absolute love and devotion to a field then I wouldnt think that way. If OP exclaimed how he's found his passion, his calling, then that would be different. To do what you loveday in day out is an absolute blessing. But being a workaholic out of pure ambition, of wanting to achieve just for the sake of success and money no matter the personal sacrifice is different. It's empty to me. I don't think Newton would have identified himself as a workaholic, he had an absolute passion for what he did yes, we are all sure of it. But the fact that his work was his day job was by the by. He would have done what he did regardless of whether it was his job or not if he could have. It wasn't just work to him, it was undoubtedly his play as well.Do you consider Shakespeare a workaholic? Do you consider a footballer a workaholic?

    Also, if someone gave me the option of being "remembered" after I'm dead, or living a happy and fulfilled life and dying an average individual, I'd choose the latter. I don't think Newton would have given a toss about achieving for the sake of being remembered either.
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    (Original post by Twinpeaks)
    So life is either a case of partying or being a workaholic? How depressing that you should think there's nothing else to obtain from life.

    I see what you mean, but what's being discussed here is different. If people were exclaiming their absolute love and devotion to a field then I wouldnt think that way. If OP exclaimed how he's found his passion, his calling, then that would be different. To do what you loveday in day out is an absolute blessing. But being a workaholic out of pure ambition, of wanting to achieve just for the sake of success and money no matter the personal sacrifice is different. It's empty to me. I don't think Newton would have identified himself as a workaholic, he had an absolute passion for what he did yes, we are all sure of it. But the fact that his work was his day job was by the by. He would have done what he did regardless of whether it was his job or not if he could have. It wasn't just work to him, it was undoubtedly his play as well.Do you consider Shakespeare a workaholic? Do you consider a footballer a workaholic?

    Also, if someone gave me the option of being "remembered" after I'm dead, or living a happy and fulfilled life and dying an average individual, I'd choose the latter. I don't think Newton would have given a toss about achieving for the sake of being remembered either.
    I happen to think the reality is depressing actually, and consider myself a realist.

    The love and devotion goes without saying, I think. I suspect all of us in this boat keep learning and working by compulsion. Yes, I want lots of money, not billions, but maybe some millions, and a six-digit paycheck. That isn't because I'm motivated by money, I don't really know what I'd do with it, but due to ambition. It's a game. I'd want to be in the top percentile, and then better, and better. It's an affection, you either get it or you don't, you have to better yourself and be better than others.

    You're right with Newton, he was obsessed, but his calculus was still a means to an end. He wasn't in love with maths, it was just a necessary part of his grand unified theory. He'd sit at his desk for days and not leave the room, unwashed, hungry, out of compulsion, and yet he still didn't love the maths. Just as it's ok for Newton to work his arse off for the cause of his GUT, it's ok for anyone else to do the same for any cause. He couldn't have not done it, because his GUT drove him, and in the same way, some of us just have to try and be the best without limit, and it's okay to be driven by that, as it is anything. Most people don't have a drive at-all, so I won't feel bad about having one.

    I think a passion and work go hand in hand. Just talk to an athlete. I suppose that's what you were saying though. A passion and hard work isn't enough though, all these great people aspire.

    That's fair enough, and there's perks to it, but personally I think I'd take the other option. I think Newton would, too. I believe there's a common strand to people who achieve that much, I don't think he could have been satisfied to work at Ye Olde Sainsburies 9-5, have a few children after the plague and die an average man. A man as driven as him could not possibly settle into such an easy lifestyle, there's no challenge. Surely you can see what I mean, even if you don't agree?

    So no, maybe not for the sake of being remembered, but I think he would have achieved for the sake of achieving. Perhaps what I said was poorly thought out. Being remembered isn't important, it's more about standing out from the other 7 billion in achievement, regardless of what they think of you. To just want to be average in a sea of 7 billion people sounds too much like giving up and being tumbleweed for something I could ever be happy with.
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    who gives a ****. there is significant corruption abuse etc in the world to render everything meaningless.
    ****ing ****
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I used to be, I used to have this roaring fire in my belly and when someone said I couldn't do something I would go to the ends of the earth and beyond to prove that I could.

    That started going away when I developed depression and now I'm just a little numb and lost. Focusing on everyday as it comes at the moment.
    I don't remember ever seeing you up this early in the morning? :eyeball: (just unexpected)
    (probs because I tend to make a habit out of staying up to silly times/it's a matter of habit, and I project the habit part)

    What has caused this depression? (I'll try help if you want, even though I have no experience.)

    (Original post by Supersaps)
    On your deathbed your regrets won't be "Oh, I wish I'd spent that extra day in the office."


    The problem with monetary ambition is it's ultimate fruitless.
    Money can finance things.

    For example, entire political campaigns...
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    sounds good bro
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    When I have a bowling alley in my house. Anyone who knows me will know I'm not joking.

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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    Consider Isaac Newton / Leibnitz with calculus. As a result of their efforts, mathematicians of the time calculated the trajectory of the planets, Isaac was able to deduce the inverse square law of gravity, and we landed on the moon, all within a few hundred years.

    That's called leaving your mark, and that's way better than any amount of partying. Newton will be remembered, while most the 7 billion of us currently breathing will be forgotten.
    Don't forget even Newton will be forgotten when the sun gobbles the earth up in the end.


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    (Original post by M3ds)
    Don't forget even Newton will be forgotten when the sun gobbles the earth up in the end.


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    He will have been forgotten long, long, long (...) before that.

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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    Consider Isaac Newton / Leibnitz with calculus. As a result of their efforts, mathematicians of the time calculated the trajectory of the planets, Isaac was able to deduce the inverse square law of gravity, and we landed on the moon, all within a few hundred years.

    That's called leaving your mark, and that's way better than any amount of partying. Newton will be remembered, while most the 7 billion of us currently breathing will be forgotten.
    Given that this has been posted in the Investment Banking and Consulting forum, I don't think anybody here is intending to become the next Newton or Leibniz, they're looking to get loaded.
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    (Original post by Hamo2509)
    A lot of my friends and family get a little glassy-eyed when I talk about my future plans.
    I kind of want to conquer the world and I don't see why I shouldn't try my hand at anything I fancy. Virtually everyone in my family is a workaholic and I'm no different. In my view, life is too short to not grab by the balls.

    I just want to stand back one day and know I've "made it". So I was wondering, at what point will everyone else consider retiring? Where does your ambition cut off?
    I am the opposite. Everyone says I am disgustingly unambitious. No, really. My feminist friends are genuinely offended by my lack of career aspirations. All I want is to be a housewife and children but apparently this now equates to failure, making me a disgrace to my gender.
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    (Original post by Hamo2509)
    That's true. I had this conversation with my aunt and uncle when the former was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis. I was told 'money doesn't matter'.
    However, they do have the money to pay for the very best private healthcare, so I guess it does in the end.
    I'm sorry about your Aunt's MS diagnosis, it's good that they're able to access good healthcare.

    It's a complicated one this, because there's a few ways to look at it. In your Aunt's case, there's no doubt that money is very useful for private medical care and for many people money can often be the difference between life or death (i.e. people who raise money for life saving treatment that the NHS don't offer).

    On the other hand, when it comes to end of life care, I've looked after people, wealthy and poor and in my experience, those with money towards the end of their life had it worse. They had to sell their property to pay for their care, yet those who don't have a penny and no property are provided with free state care. I worked in a place where some patients were paying private fees and some were getting free care and a state pension.They all had the same level of care - so it wasn't as though the private patients were better off. It was actually quite frustrating knowing that some of those people had worked themselves to the bone for years, hoping for their children to have a good inheritance, but ultimately had to sell everything. Yet there were others who possibly didn't work so hard throughout their lives who didn't have to pay anything for their care.

    Obviously the state has a duty to provide for those who can't afford it especially when they've had a stroke or have late stage dementia etc and simply cannot look after themselves. But it does make you question whether it's even sensible to work all your life to afford a modest house and savings....because you're very likely to be using it all to pay for your own care in your old age when really, you could rent and have minimal savings and get free care in old age. In other words, you may as well enjoy whatever your earn whilst you're young enough rather than squirreling it away - because you'll never get to enjoy it whilst it's sat in an ISA or property, and who knows, any of us could get him by a bus tomorrow. I know one patient I cared for who refused to sell off their children's inheritance and instead rented their old property to pay for their own care and I just find it shocking that a 96 year old has to rent out their property in order to pay monthly care fees whilst sitting next to another elderly person with no savings or property who receives free care. It's definitely not an equal society. You'd think by 96 you'd be able to relax, but no.

    So yes, money is great for private medical care, but from what I've seen it's not so great in very old age. Bit of a catch 22 really.
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    A word from the wise.

    My uncle is the global head of ABS investments at HSBC managing around 35bn assets. He's lovely but rather isolated, doesn't have a family. He's dedicated his life to work. And that's what he's got to show for it.

    At the end of the day, it won't keep you warm at night.


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    I'm not ambitious myself, but I love hiring people who are.
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    Ambitious people will vote for TRUMP-PENCE 2016!! If you're an American like me, vote DONALD J TRUMP for President!
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    (Original post by Supersaps)
    A word from the wise.

    My uncle is the global head of ABS investments at HSBC managing around 35bn assets. He's lovely but rather isolated, doesn't have a family. He's dedicated his life to work. And that's what he's got to show for it.

    At the end of the day, it won't keep you warm at night.


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    I think it's a fallacy to think that all hard-working people have no time to build personal relationships and are lonely. There are people who also work their arse off for no money at all and end up in the same position.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I used to be, I used to have this roaring fire in my belly and when someone said I couldn't do something I would go to the ends of the earth and beyond to prove that I could.

    That started going away when I developed depression and now I'm just a little numb and lost. Focusing on everyday as it comes at the moment.
    I really hope you gain the help that you need. Taking things a day at a time is a good coping strategy. All the best.
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    (Original post by Hamo2509)
    I think it's a fallacy to think that all hard-working people have no time to build personal relationships and are lonely. There are people who also work their arse off for no money at all and end up in the same position.
    Except I don't think that, obviously?

    I think it's all about balance. Many people put their career ahead of long term relationships. I think this is a mistake in terms of life satisfaction.


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