Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by fefssdf)
    Well I have offers for maths so I should be off to do a maths degree this September ; woop and oh haha I did psychology alevel but have no intention of teaching it cause it's mostly just memorising studies which requires little effort of the teacher whereas maths you have to actually think aha !

    Did you do further maths? do you think further maths is needed to teach maths in secondary school?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onica)
    Hi! * *

    Question 1

    I've heard a lot of negative news about the hours that teachers work, some saying that it's ridiculous- is this true?

    Question 2

    How is the salary compared to other professions like Pharmacy for example. Looking at the pay scales, the starting salary is 22k and the pay increase in incremental each year. Also, do you need to have at least 6 years' experience in order to apply for head of department roles and head of year role?

    Question 3

    What routes can you take for training that will include a salary while you train to get your PCGE? It says that the route via school direct ( salaried), you must have full-time work experience at least 3 years. However, I won't have this as I'm a student and only have part-time experience so how would I be able to apply for this route?


    I've also been thinking of doing a law conversion course (GDL) and then the L PC exams if this does not seem to be a good profession. Do you think it would be a wise decision and do you get funding in a form of bursary and scholarship for conversion courses for law? Has anyone done a law conversion course before?? Just curious


    Sorry it's long but I'm just not sure if it's a good profession due to the negative things people have said. Thanks

    Q1 - Yes. It is often said it is a lifestyle, not a job. I think this is accurate. You have to be willing to put a lot of your own time in.

    Q2 - I personally think it's very poor and not comparable to other professions given the amount of work that goes in. I feel the pay does not reflect my effort or stress levels.

    Q3 -

    Yeah so there's salaried SD which it sounds you're ineligible for. There's also Teach First graduate scheme which you could apply for with History.
    *
    I don't know anything about law (besides it being wildly competitive so you'll want a first class degree for a start). *

    *
    (Original post by THE EPIC Panda)
    Those who can do. Those who can't, teach.
    Don't be an ignorant ass who obviously has no understanding of how difficult the career is.*
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emz99)
    Interesting I am also thing maths or Pyschology teacher. I currently don't take further maths but may decide to in the future. What degree do you hope to study?
    Maths or Psychology...

    Hmm, one has massive job security and a very attractive training bursary. The other offers no job security nor training bursary. I know which I'd be going for!!*
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Its a good security profession, my dream is to marry a teacher as I think she will be the best mom ever.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onica)


    I've also been thinking of doing a law conversion course (GDL) and then the L PC exams if this does not seem to be a good profession. Do you think it would be a wise decision and do you get funding in a form of bursary and scholarship for conversion courses for law? Has anyone done a law conversion course before?? Just curious


    Sorry it's long but I'm just not sure if it's a good profession due to the negative things people have said. Thanks
    You can't just willy nilly bounce between law and teaching, if you're serious about law I would get stuck into researching and networking - now.

    If you play your cards right and apply to the various schemes available to you at undergrad, you could get a legal training contract from a firm willing to pay for all of the gdl and lpc as well as provide a living stipend.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Honestly, having worked in education ever since graduating, never as a teacher in the UK - but I have worked with schools in the UK, and am constantly in contact/dealing with teachers, I would always second the recomendation of:

    Try it.

    To many people just presume they will both be a good teacher, and actually enjoy it.. becuase of some ******** justification of:

    'Its so rewarding...' 'I am passionate for helping people' blah blah.

    --

    Maybe you are, maybe you are not, but there is a lot more to teaching then being passionate and finding it rewarding. No chance you are thinking 'this is so rewarding' when you have a couple of horrors ruining your well laid plans, and your tired from marking until late.. your stressed because of the huge amount of bureaucracy that goes into your job, and the crazy targets your boss is setting for you.

    I would recomend to all who are interested in education to do a number of the following:

    Volenteer in a school, for a minimum of a few weeks, preferably giving a bit of time each week for a whole term/year.

    This will give you a good picture of school life, but it wont show you what its like to be a teacher. Volenteering will always have you as an assistant, a 2nd. To truely understand what its like to lead, and realise if you are actually any good at it.. I would say that its essential you find some way of putting yourself in a position of leadership:

    For example, my sister, before becoming a teacher took over a cub group. She had 20 11-12 year old boys to manage, plan for, control etc. once a week for a year.. That was much more valuable to her then just watching other people teach, as it actually taught her and let her experiance leadership.

    Mentoring younger students, private tuition, working with a nursery, volenteering at a youth centre, scouts, cubs, guides, brownies, church groups etc. all types of things that can help you experiance planning, organisation, control and leadership.

    ---

    The problem with teaching is that everyone thinks they can do it, but actually most people cant. The good news is that it has amazing job security, so even if you cant, its unlikely you will be forced out! But seriously, anyone can get to the level of study required to teach, but having the actually ability to excel in front of a big class is something different.

    There is money in the career though for the best of the best.. you just need to think outside the standard school system.. once you have experience there are lots of options open, from colleges, to private education, to language schools, international educational programs, universities, community programs, and much more.. you just need to be prepared to think of education as a large industry, and not just individual schools.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onica)
    Hi,

    Yes, I would love to help students succeed and know it's rewarding and I've always been interested in education. I'm not trying to sound greedy, but it's unfair that after many years of study, pay is little. I know pharmacy is a completely different degree and years of study, but for example, my cousin will hopefully qualify as a pharmacist next year, and will be on 30k ish, while I'm on 22k and slowly working my way up.

    I also don't know what else I can do with a History and Sociology degree, but I know I'm interested in education. It's just unfair how the teaching profession isn't valued much!
    I would advise you to start up a YouTube channel where you can upload videos for whatever subject(s) you are doing. It may be able to top up your income if you do reasonably well.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emz99)
    Did you do further maths? do you think further maths is needed to teach maths in secondary school?
    I did further maths AS cause my school doesn't teach further maths but I really wanted to do it so managed to complete AS but didn't do A2 cause it was too much work considering I already had to self teach one maths module this year. Seeing as you can get into a maths degree having done no form of further maths then it's wouldn't say further maths is needed to teach in secondary schools unless you were going to be teaching alevel further maths but most maths teachers are just going to be teaching GCSE meaning you would only really need your own GCSE knowledge and A-level maths in order to explain concepts more effectively ; personally I want to go into teaching A-level maths and GCSE maths and my degree should mean I'm confident to do that, but schools have a serious shortage of maths teachers - ones at my school keep leaving it seems - so as long as you had A-level maths and a degree somewhat relevant to maths like even psychology has statistics in it then you can train to teach maths ; teach first for instance just requires a 2:1/2:2 degree I think and then a good A-level maths grade but obviously I would imagine this is particularly competitive so better to have an actual maths degree . Sorry this dragged on loool
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emz99)
    Academies pay that much. He is a history teacher deputy headmaster now. He climbed the ranks really quickly I guess.
    The statistics I mentioned include academies who still have to submit their accounts to the government and have to publish their finances online. There are zero deputy headteachers earning £120k. All salaries above £100k are going to headteachers, a lot of whom are in charge of multiple schools.
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pierson)
    The statistics I mentioned include academies who still have to submit their accounts to the government and have to publish their finances online. There are zero deputy headteachers earning £120k. All salaries above £100k are going to headteachers, a lot of whom are in charge of multiple schools.
    Look I don't what to say but I am pretty sure there are. Do some research and you will find out. There was an article about how academies pay so much. From my perespective

    Starting teacher 25k
    Teacher with some resposbilites like maths co-ordinator, gifted & talented head basically teachers who are good with no proper responsibilities 25k-£35k
    Head of year or department £35-45k excluding maths, english, science
    Head of departments Maths, Science , English 55k?
    Head of sixth form 60-70k?
    Director 70-85k
    Vice Principal 85k-100k
    Principal 100k-125k
    Theres also something called a principal which who looks over multiple schools and they earn even more.

    Where do you think this is wrong?
    Offline

    6
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Emz99)
    Yes exactly but don't worry if you are a good you will climb up the ranks. I live on the outskirts of London and know teachers in my school teachers to earn 40K in 3 years and they start at 27K. It depends on the location. One teacher who is amazing is earning £120,000 and he is only 29/30. I think if you go to a good university you will have a chance of going really far really quickly.

    Wow, does he work at a private school?
    • TSR Support Team
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onica)
    Hi!

    So growing up I have always wondered that why do some individuals succeed and why do others fail in the education system? I guess my interest in wanting to go into teaching was due to my experience in the education system. I went to a school that was under-performing, and although I thrived and did well, I was always concerned about those, formerly my peers, who were unable to succeed in the education system. I was always concerned about the inequality that existed in our education system because it can be argued that some have more economic and cultural advantage in comparison to others. I also questioned whether our education system is effective in promoting social mobility. I have an offer for History and Sociology to study at the University of Warwick and hope to go into teaching after my degree. However, I have a few questions about this profession as some say it's not the best profession to go into.

    Question 1

    I've heard a lot of negative news about the hours that teachers work, some saying that it's ridiculous- is this true?

    Question 2

    How is the salary compared to other professions like Pharmacy for example. Looking at the pay scales, the starting salary is 22k and the pay increase in incremental each year. Also, do you need to have at least 6 years' experience in order to apply for head of department roles and head of year role?

    Question 3

    What routes can you take for training that will include a salary while you train to get your PCGE? It says that the route via school direct ( salaried), you must have full-time work experience at least 3 years. However, I won't have this as I'm a student and only have part-time experience so how would I be able to apply for this route?


    I've also been thinking of doing a law conversion course (GDL) and then the L PC exams if this does not seem to be a good profession. Do you think it would be a wise decision and do you get funding in a form of bursary and scholarship for conversion courses for law? Has anyone done a law conversion course before?? Just curious


    Sorry it's long but I'm just not sure if it's a good profession due to the negative things people have said. Thanks
    Q1 - there is no doubt that there have been increasing pressure from the government placed on teachers, which has said to put the profession at an all time low, crisis point. More and more teachers are leaving the profession every year because of the ridiculous work/life balance (or the lack thereof) and the compromises they have to put between their professional and personal life. There is quite a lot of bad management about these days because SLT cannot cope with the pressure for their Heads so the SLT put more pressure on the teachers. A lot of schools are being called "exam factories" - only caring about exam results and less about the student welfare and what that sort of pressure is doing to the kids. There's also been an increase of data analysis and marking which teachers have complained this is taking away actual teaching time and affects students' learning and progress.

    Q2 - I believe Pharmacists earn over £25K per year, so a little bit extra to that of teachers. The pay only increases very steadily in the teaching profession. It doesn't increase that much unless you hold extra responsibilities that's on the Teachers' Pay Scale. In theory, you don't need to have 6 years experience to be promoted to middle management in a secondary school. However, most experienced teachers would say to NQTs that you should focus on honing your skills and craft as a classroom teacher nowadays. Especially, as there is less time on this focus, and more on data analysis and classroom management. There is no stopping a school from hiring an NQT for a Head of Year of Head of Department, but most skeptic teachers would say that school must be desperate to hire an NQT for a middle management role. You usually work your way up. For example, if you want to be Head of Year, then it's best to start out as a form tutor, then being an assistant to that particular year for a couple of years. Same for HoD. Most are given a Key Stage to look after or to lead and with success, it would be much wiser to apply for HoD as it's a lot of responsibility, especially for a core subject like Maths or English.

    Q3 - https://getintoteaching.education.gov.uk/

    I wanna be an English teacher some day but right now, I'm staying well away from Education. We have had 3 Education Secretaries in the past 5 years and 2/3 have bought shame upon the teaching profession. I have no idea how this new one will do under May's constituency.

    I'm forever on TES, and there's at least 3-5 post per week of a teacher wanting to quit. A lot of them say, if you're interested in raising a family, then don't enter the profession. It's good for holidays and pension, but it's not worth the stress. More and more teachers are returning to work with a mental health disorder such as depression or anxiety or substance abuse such as alcoholism and drug abuse (TES did a survey) which found out more teachers can't hope with the demands of the job so their mental or physical health are being jeopardized.

    If you want to get into teaching, your best bet is to do work experience in schools by shadowing a classroom teacher. I say you should go to as many different school as possible because EVERY school is different. I would say you try some academics, some state schools and independent schools and possibly Grammar Schools if they're still about.

    Until they get the pay sorted out as well as stop threatening schools with OFSTED and so forth then I would reconsider entering the profession in this decade. But as far as I'm concerned, I don't wanna join. I did work experience at my school a few days back and I just thought I'd love to be a classroom teacher but most my exp was short lived cause there was far too much admin to do, it was ridiculous.

    There will always be a need for teachers. The profession won't die out - I think just joining it when it improves will be better. I think getting industry experience first is also better, rather than going straight from school, to uni, then back into the classroom. It's very ignorant in my opinion. Try and do industry and see more of the world first.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Of course teaching is a nice profession. I am a teacher. I like my profession very much
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brussels sprouts
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.