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    • Welcome Squad
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    Oh wow, I was expecting something old but I certainly wasn't expecting a first gen i5. I did think it might have been something more modern. Most definitely going to be a dual core then, especially on a mobile model. It'll work but it won't feel like a modern i5 by any stretch.

    But then that's a 2010 processor for you. In terms of computer tech we've come a very long way in the past few years.

    Agreed with all your other points, lots of important details.
    Just found the Intel page of that i5:
    http://ark.intel.com/products/47341/...Cache-2_40-GHz
    It is indeed a processor from 2010. To be honest, most modern (i.e. 4th gen or newer) intel i3's would probably outperform that i5, especially if coupled with more modern, faster RAM. And that link confirms that it is a dual core processor (though with 4 threads, using hyperthreading, though that won't be as good as an actual quad core processor).

    My newest computer (a HP from late last year) ha an Intel i7-4510U (4th gen). It feels much faster than my previous Acer, with an i5-480M (1st gen).

    Chances are, this Dell mentioned earlier: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/162141347431 would be a better shot, as it has a 4th gen intel i5 (4310U). It's 4 years newer, so would likely perform better, despite it being dual core:
    http://ark.intel.com/products/80343/...up-to-3_00-GHz

    Oh, and the 4th gen is more power efficient too - 15W instead of the 35W of the 1st gen i5.
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    Yeah defo upgrade the RAM. If OP doesn't need a lot of storage space then I'd stick to the SSD if I was him, although small you get nice boot up time and generally more sappiness. Depends on OPs personal use tho.

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    • Welcome Squad
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    (Original post by y-hus)
    Yeah defo upgrade the RAM. If OP doesn't need a lot of storage space then I'd stick to the SSD if I was him, although small you get nice boot up time and generally more sappiness. Depends on OPs personal use tho.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    In an ideal situation, you'd go for a dual drive scenario - the 128GB SSD for Windows and a 1TB HDD for everything else, so you get a good responsive speed, whilst maintaining storage capabilities. Though having said that, all of my computers have been reasonably fast and they are mechanical HDDs.
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    In an ideal situation, you'd go for a dual drive scenario - the 128GB SSD for Windows and a 1TB HDD for everything else, so you get a good responsive speed, whilst maintaining storage capabilities. Though having said that, all of my computers have been reasonably fast and they are mechanical HDDs.
    I partially disagree with that. Ideal is different for different people. I have a laptop that I use as my daily driver but also run off a desktop a fair amount of time. I've got a 256GB M.2 SSD in the laptop which is more than enough for me. Desktop uses a 1TB SSD which is half full at the moment. Documents are stored across 14TB of standard hard drives.

    If you've got a laptop with dual slots for drives my ideal setup (ignoring cost) would be to go for a large (512GB or 1TB) SSD. An additional drive could be added if that wasn't enough for storage, otherwise I'd probably just run two 1TB SSD in a mirrored RAID configuration for redundancy.

    I'd only consider 128GB SSD and a 1TB HDD to be ideal on a budget. And providing you had multiple drive slots.
    • Welcome Squad
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    (Original post by Acsel)
    I partially disagree with that. Ideal is different for different people. I have a laptop that I use as my daily driver but also run off a desktop a fair amount of time. I've got a 256GB M.2 SSD in the laptop which is more than enough for me. Desktop uses a 1TB SSD which is half full at the moment. Documents are stored across 14TB of standard hard drives.

    If you've got a laptop with dual slots for drives my ideal setup (ignoring cost) would be to go for a large (512GB or 1TB) SSD. An additional drive could be added if that wasn't enough for storage, otherwise I'd probably just run two 1TB SSD in a mirrored RAID configuration for redundancy.

    I'd only consider 128GB SSD and a 1TB HDD to be ideal on a budget. And providing you had multiple drive slots.
    If you run a laptop off a desktop, then that is absolutely fine. However, I don't have any desktops, and certainly wouldn't run a laptop off a desktop - hence the requirement for large storage on a standalone machine (which is why I suggested the 128GB/1TB).

    How much do SSD's cost nowadays? (Particularly large storage ones, such as 1TB?) If 1TB SSD's are still very expensive, and my laptop only had 1 hard drive slot, I'd more than likely ditch the SSD altogether and get a 2TB conventional hard drive. I haven't noticed HDD's to run that slowly!
    • Community Assistant
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    If you run a laptop off a desktop, then that is absolutely fine. However, I don't have any desktops, and certainly wouldn't run a laptop off a desktop - hence the requirement for large storage on a standalone machine (which is why I suggested the 128GB/1TB).

    How much do SSD's cost nowadays? (Particularly large storage ones, such as 1TB?) If 1TB SSD's are still very expensive, and my laptop only had 1 hard drive slot, I'd more than likely ditch the SSD altogether and get a 2TB conventional hard drive. I haven't noticed HDD's to run that slowly!
    What do you mean by run a laptop off a desktop exactly?

    Depends on the make obviously but 500GB tend to start around £100 and upwards, 1TB starting around £180 and up. That said I picked up my 1TB SSD last year in the black Friday sales on Amazon for just shy of £150. Obviously the M.2 and PCI-E models price more expensively, with M.2 SSD's clocking in at well over £200 (with very few options to choose from right now). That said prices are dropping.

    If you're feeling adventurous you can pick up a 4TB SSD for £1300 right now!

    I think I'd go the opposite route really. If storage was going to be an issue I feel like the difference between 1TB and 2TB will become negligible at some point. If I'm using up storage at that speed I'm going to run out of space on a 2TB drive at some point and would look at other solutions (external drives, personal NAS and server systems and so on).

    While there are a few 2.5 inch drives (lets face it, it's unlikely you'll be putting a 3.5 inch drive in a laptop) over 2TB, they're far and few between. So 2TB would be your realistic upper storage limit. Prices on them seem to range from £80 to around £130. If I'm going to a have a storage issue anyway I'd personally go for an internal SSD (probably 256GB or 512GB) and invest in a cheaper external drive (I picked up a 2TB external drive yesterday for a mere £54) or a NAS system. It's not for everyone but that'd be my personal setup.

    What is worth noting though is that this may all be a thing of the past soon. With laptops getting thinner the option to ad a 2.5 inch drive is rapidly diminishing. When we get to a stage with M.2 is the only default in laptops we simply won't have an option to add a hard drive. Hopefully by then the price of such drives has dropped considerably. Thankfully hard drive are pretty much at their bottom limit and prices won't drop much more. SSD's on the other hand are on a continuous downward spiral. Just a few years ago I had a PC with a 128GB SSD. I updated that to 256GB the year after and 1TB last year, paying roughly the same amount each time for the upgrade. Prices are dropping and dropping fast.
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    In what way has your Samsung NP300E5E broke? The Series 3 laptops are really good and, since yours was made in 2013, it is too early to replace (laptops should last a good 5-8 years assuming they weren't thrown out the window).

    At £150, or even up to £300, you are looking at a laptop that will have lower build quality and performance than your current one.

    I suggest looking into what broke and see if you can get it repaired.

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