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    (Original post by 1c8e2)
    Turbomachinery
    Thanks for the info! Turbo-machinery is an area that use thermofluids, so I can see why chemical engineers could also find work here as they cover thermodynamics and fluid mechanics too.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Thanks for the info! Turbo-machinery is an area that use thermofluids, so I can see why chemical engineers could also find work here as they cover thermodynamics and fluid mechanics too.
    Yep definitely. However, theres a very big emphasis on materials, manufacturing and aerodynamic performamce. Hence why they were mostly mechanical in the past - everything can be learned on the job though!
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    (Original post by 1c8e2)
    Pretty much. Natural progression for a chemical engineer is either within oil and gas or pharmaceuticals and the former is like gold dust nowadays. Im not saying there's no jobs, just compared to a mechanical engineer you have a lot less to choose from. The place i did my internship was purely mechanical based but theyve recently started accepting chemeng. Its up to you where you decide to work in in the future, i personally had no idea so purposely picked a broader subject.
    Not sure I agree with this. There's more sectors chemical engineers can go into: water, food, nuclear..
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    (Original post by adam132)
    Not sure I agree with this. There's more sectors chemical engineers can go into: water, food, nuclear..
    Yep, I would say nuclear maybe not so anymore after the last few weeks lol, and not everybody wants to live in West Cumbria either.

    Food manufacturing is the best shout as people will always need it, although it can be exceedingly dull I hear, watching lines of chocolate bars going by on a conveyor belt gets old after a while.

    Water would be my personal choice, sounds like you manage to incorporate as much of what you're taught to do on your degree as possible.

    In general though, most of the jobs going that would suit a chemeng could just as easily be filled by a mecheng grad. My advice would be do a general engineering or a mechanical engineering bachelors degree, then go to Europe for a masters in chemical where it's way cheaper than UK, if the job market has picked up.
 
 
 
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