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    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    yes that is true, however who says that all iconic villains must have supernatural aspects in order for them to be acceptable to admire? can we only appreciate villains who are written in completely unrealistic standards? Isn't a villain committing such horrific crimes in such a "mundane" setting, even more powerful?

    I disagree with the Fred West thing. You keep blurring the lines between real life criminals and fictional ones. Fred West was a real serial killer who tortured many women and to use his name would be disrespectul to all his victims, really. Because the crimes really happened, to real people.
    However, Humbert Humbert is, again, fictional. I do not at all admire or condone his paedophilic actions; this is only the basis of his character! Instead, he is admired for his ability to get away with such volatile crimes whilst hidden in plain sight; his charming wit which allows him to so smoothly get away with the unthinkable; his ability to make the reader feel conflicted about their own morals because of his sheer power of manipulation. Nabokov wrote the character in such a way that he wanted the reader to be on Humbert's side, something that is not easy to achieve; yes, I know he is anything but a good character and I have never made that claim. I'm simply appreciating his brilliance as a character. Nobody idolises a villain for their actual crimes; rather, the way the villain is portrayed in regards to the book as a whole. I don't understand why you imply we should be treading on eggshells when it comes to any characters who commit genuinely realistic crimes, rather than shooting fire from a wand. Just my opinion.

    and yeah back to subjects (this seems more like an afterthought rather than the actual topic now hah) - am I right in thinking all three involve essays? If so, I suppose it's now mainly up to what I think I'd enjoy most. I'm leaning towards Classical Civ.
    I don't appreciate the brilliance of murderous child molestors. Even fictional ones.
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    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    Yes I did think it would go well with the subjects! Is there much maths involved in Psychology?
    About 10% of the exam will involve calculations.
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    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    yes that is true, however who says that all iconic villains must have supernatural aspects in order for them to be acceptable to admire? can we only appreciate villains who are written in completely unrealistic standards? Isn't a villain committing such horrific crimes in such a "mundane" setting, even more powerful?

    I disagree with the Fred West thing. You keep blurring the lines between real life criminals and fictional ones. Fred West was a real serial killer who tortured many women and to use his name would be disrespectul to all his victims, really. Because the crimes really happened, to real people.
    However, Humbert Humbert is, again, fictional. I do not at all admire or condone his paedophilic actions; this is only the basis of his character! Instead, he is admired for his ability to get away with such volatile crimes whilst hidden in plain sight; his charming wit which allows him to so smoothly get away with the unthinkable; his ability to make the reader feel conflicted about their own morals because of his sheer power of manipulation. Nabokov wrote the character in such a way that he wanted the reader to be on Humbert's side, something that is not easy to achieve; yes, I know he is anything but a good character and I have never made that claim. I'm simply appreciating his brilliance as a character. Nobody idolises a villain for their actual crimes; rather, the way the villain is portrayed in regards to the book as a whole. I don't understand why you imply we should be treading on eggshells when it comes to any characters who commit genuinely realistic crimes, rather than shooting fire from a wand. Just my opinion.

    and yeah back to subjects (this seems more like an afterthought rather than the actual topic now hah) - am I right in thinking all three involve essays? If so, I suppose it's now mainly up to what I think I'd enjoy most. I'm leaning towards Classical Civ.
    I'll be studying Lolita come Sept for uni so thanks for your comments!

    I did Classical Civ at uni for my 1st year. Absolutely hated it! I loved learning about it; watching docus or reading about it but studying it was horrendous for me. I still find it interesting and if I were good at studying History, I would of kept at it.

    I personally think Psychology sounds more interesting and if I was good at Maths, I'd probs take it. But, as someone said, it's a (social) science rather than a humanities. So if you're good at sciences then go for it. I also think if you're doing English Lit at A-level and your Classical Civ is focused on Classical Lit rather than Ancient History, I'd say go for Psychology. Unis are looking for more varied applicants, especially RG unis. They want applicants to be versatile. And if you wanna aspire to apply to high-top universities, then studying a multi-range subjects would be best as CC is too similar to English Lit (if your CC is too literary).
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    Classics for me. Mix of lit and history. You should look at the syllabus though especually to see if there is a language component i.e Greek or Latin.
    Classics considered a traditional A level.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    Fictional characters don't bother me at all - rather the sentiment that you would choose to name yourself after the world's most famous literary paedophile.

    Are Classical Civ and Psychology your only choices?
    Name of a fictional character on an online account. There is plenty of disassociation on the use of internet alone, never mind when you combine that with the use of fictional character names (double disassociation?). Well written evil characters remain imprinted on the brains of readers.

    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    Hi, (edit- title was supposed to say classical, not classic haha)

    I'm currently making my A level choices and since AS levels have now been scrapped, we only choose 3 now. At the moment I've chosen English Literature and Maths (I'm good at maths, I enjoy it and I wanted some variety), but I'm conflicted between psychology and classical civilisation for the third subject! I would love to study English Lit at a good Russell group university, by the way. I'm currently considering Oxbridge, but hey, that might be a bit ambitious of me!

    I'm really really interested in psychology as a subject, but I do think that CC is more respected, especially by universities such as Cambridge, and I really would not like to hinder my chances! Also, I have not done Classics or Latin GCSE and apart from doing a little in Year 9, I have pretty minimal knowledge of the subject. However, I've heard that it involves a lot of literature and analysis and that seems to appeal to me, especially since my school has opted for mainly literature modules and I'd really like to expand my breadth of knowledge in these areas that I've never studied before.
    Also, just extra info, I'm very able at writing essays and reading large amounts etc.

    I guess what I'm asking is, in terms of my situation, would Classical Civilisation or psychology a level be more suitable/beneficial? Would it be too difficult to do CC if I've never studied it before? Is it an interesting subject to study, or is psychology more stimulating? Is one significantly harder than the other in terms or workload and exams?

    Thanks! Sorry if I made any typos, I typed this quite hurriedly!
    I'm quite certain that psychology is far more useful than classical civilisation, be it in terms of real life and in terms of academic ability. Both are memory intensive (I'd suppose) but psychology would likely be of far more help to you in personal terms (you can combine your academically studied psychology with self taught body language/speech pattern analysis/microexpressions to give yourself an edge in most encounters IRL or online; it's generally very interesting) and is surely at the very least just as academic as CC (in terms of uni).

    I don't how how much easier CC would be than Psychology, but I'd assume a (CC) history A level to not be much easier than a Psychology A level. Perhaps you can apply modern history to real life (in terms of geopolitics, international relations, economics, etc) but not so much CC. CC is nice as a small side hobby (half good convo topics I guess?) but Psychology is definitely more useful on most all front

    I think that in terms of subject prestige normal History would be a bit more prestigious than Psychology due to.. its history as a respected A level. But I'd still say Psychology is plenty more interesting. If you like knowing what people think or rather how they tend to think, go for Psychology. More useful than any History A level, I'd say. Have you considered going for an Economics A level? Would go brilliantly with Maths
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    (Original post by roarchika)
    It's most definitely doable. ClassCiv was basically designed to allow students who had never studied an ancient language to be able to still enjoy Classics, so you'll only be reading translations for your set text, and all your interactions with the literature will be in English. You may have to learn some Greek words if you're doing Greek Tragedy and Drama (as my school does - that + the Odyssey are by far the two most popular units), but those are pretty easy and are just technical terms, e.g. pathos, which is something that evokes pity or sadness in the audience for a character. The exam questions usually have something to do with character development or the role of females/gods/etc, so are very easy to prepare for - they do reword questions from past exams quite often, so as long as you've done your fair share of past papers and know your texts well, getting an A is very easy!
    ah, okay thanks, that's really reassuring to hear! do you have to learn quotes etc?
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    As someone who has taken both A-levels, I'd recommend looking into the units for both before deciding. I loved both units for the AS, but the A2 units for Psychology didn't interest me as much.

    In addition to this, the Classics answers are more detailed with needing to know dates and events etc, but the psychology answers for A2 require you to know a LOT concerning key (and sometimes even the smaller) studies for both Outline and Evaluate.

    I personally would choose Classics, but that's just me.
    I hope this helps!
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    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    ah, okay thanks, that's really reassuring to hear! do you have to learn quotes etc?
    You can if you want to, but it's 100% not necessary. You have to know the plots back to front, and some people learn epithets (descriptions for characters, e.g. "cloud-gathering Zeus" - normally two words + a name so not v hard to learn!), but I focused on just learning the plot inside and out and was fine.
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    (Original post by Trinculo)
    I don't appreciate the brilliance of murderous child molestors. Even fictional ones.
    I used to live with one of The lawyers son of This case And I didn't know about It at all until he told me some détails and It sounds unimaginably awful coming from a person So close to It. It reverberates with you even though you weren't there. I was a bit shook for a while afterwards. I was 18 and it's still disgusting now.
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    (Original post by Anfanny)
    I used to live with one of The lawyers son of This case And I didn't know about It at all until he told me some détails and It sounds unimaginably awful coming from a person So close to It. It reverberates with you even though you weren't there. I was a bit shook for a while afterwards. I was 18 and it's still disgusting now.
    not really sure what "case" you're referring to?
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    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    not really sure what "case" you're referring to?
    The Wests.
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    Take history of art o spanish
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    (Original post by humbert-humbert)
    Hi, (edit- title was supposed to say classical, not classic haha)

    I'm currently making my A level choices and since AS levels have now been scrapped, we only choose 3 now. At the moment I've chosen English Literature and Maths (I'm good at maths, I enjoy it and I wanted some variety), but I'm conflicted between psychology and classical civilisation for the third subject! I would love to study English Lit at a good Russell group university, by the way. I'm currently considering Oxbridge, but hey, that might be a bit ambitious of me!

    I'm really really interested in psychology as a subject, but I do think that CC is more respected, especially by universities such as Cambridge, and I really would not like to hinder my chances! Also, I have not done Classics or Latin GCSE and apart from doing a little in Year 9, I have pretty minimal knowledge of the subject. However, I've heard that it involves a lot of literature and analysis and that seems to appeal to me, especially since my school has opted for mainly literature modules and I'd really like to expand my breadth of knowledge in these areas that I've never studied before.
    Also, just extra info, I'm very able at writing essays and reading large amounts etc.

    I guess what I'm asking is, in terms of my situation, would Classical Civilisation or psychology a level be more suitable/beneficial? Would it be too difficult to do CC if I've never studied it before? Is it an interesting subject to study, or is psychology more stimulating? Is one significantly harder than the other in terms or workload and exams?

    Thanks! Sorry if I made any typos, I typed this quite hurriedly!
    I am currently studying classics and psychology (and english lit) and imo from what you've said I would say classics is the best choice, classics is so interesting and it is like a mixture of GCSE English Lit and History. Psychology is very science-y and a LOT to remember and if you're better at essay subjects classics is definitely the better option. If you're taking classics for the mythology side of it and nothing else I would check out what modules you actually study because it's not always that. Psychology is very interesting but it really depends on whether you want science/maths subjects as your main subjects or essay subjects. Also it is of note to mention that classics and english lit go very well together but I'm not entirely sure Psychology and maths go well together as, thought there is a maths element to psychology, it's mainly GCSE grade statistics.
    I hope this helped and I hope you enjoy your subjects whatever you pick !!!
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    I do Classical Civilisation and everyone I know who does it loves it we do the Odyssey and Greek Tragedy (and then the Aeneid and Greek art and architecture in second year, but I do four at the moment so I'm dropping Classics at the end of the year).In relation to if you need prior knowledge, basic knowledge of a couple of Greek literature terms and Greek culture terms would be helpful (eg. xenia, the concept of family and kleos) as well as a basic knowledge of Greek gods.

    It's really fun, WAY more fun than English Literature. The texts are pretty easy to understand and you don't need to read essays that critics have written or anything like that. Classics is a really respected subject overall and it's a rarer A-Level which means it'll stand out on your application.

    In the way of Psychology, everyone I know who takes it absolutely hates their teacher/the lessons/the content. Even people who want to do it at university find it really trying. Everyone I know seems to really struggle with the exam questions too, so if you have to pick one of the two I'd say avoid Psychology. It's one of the most popular A-Levels that isn't Maths or English because it's 'something new' and people think it will be interesting, so just make sure you actually want to do the subject rather than wanting a concept. It's the same type of thing, I think, as everyone wanting to take Media or Business Studies when they do GCSEs.

    I know you said your school only lets you take three, but try and bend the rules if you can! It's really important that you don't make the wrong choice and as a strong prospective Oxbridge applicant (hopefully) your school will want you to do well.
 
 
 
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