Train driver forgets to stop at a station

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    A few years ago I was on the late night train to Vasa in Finland and it failed to stop at one of the intermediate stations on the line. By the time the passengers who wanted to get off had found the guard, it had gone many miles past the station on the single line. They backed it up though to let the people off. The train was about an hour late in Vasa.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    A few years ago I was on the late night train to Vasa in Finland and it failed to stop at one of the intermediate stations on the line. By the time the passengers who wanted to get off had found the guard, it had gone many miles past the station on the single line. They backed it up though to let the people off. The train was about an hour late in Vasa.
    This is one of those lines with one train a day or something? Were you in a Scandinavian noir plot?
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    This is one of those lines with one train a day or something?
    There were more trains on the line, about 4 or 5 a day, but this was the last one.

    Were you in a Scandinavian noir plot?
    There was nothing noir about it. This was midsummer and I remember wandering the town at midnight in daylight looking for something to eat.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    Lol, that's a great work story. :teehee:

    I travel on the Overground most days and it's so slow, I often wish the driver would miss the odd station out and just keep going. Provided it wasn't mine, obviously. :giggle:
    Thanks. Funnily enough that day was also the first day that a whole new computerised system was being tested and everything went wrong so that at the end of my shift no one knew where any of the trains were.

    But I was enjoying myself so much that I voluntarily went Eastwards from Acton where I could have got off and did another unpaid two hours.

    (I soon learnt of course )

    Yeah,driving tube trains is a blast when's there's hardly any passengers
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    Why is this news lol
    My bus misses stops all da time
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    (Original post by moggis)
    Thanks. Funnily enough that day was also the first day that a whole new computerised system was being tested and everything went wrong so that at the end of my shift no one knew where any of the trains were.

    But I was enjoying myself so much that I voluntarily went Eastwards from Acton where I could have got off and did another unpaid two hours.

    (I soon learnt of course )

    Yeah,driving tube trains is a blast when's there's hardly any passengers
    I always imagine it's a really awful job, especially on very busy, hot, mostly underground ones.
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    How is this news?

    I have been on 2 trains this month where the driver has forgotten to open the doors.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    There were more trains on the line, about 4 or 5 a day, but this was the last one.



    There was nothing noir about it. This was midsummer and I remember wandering the town at midnight in daylight looking for something to eat.
    It often feels like there are only about 5 trains a day on many London commuter routes. :cry2:
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    I always imagine it's a really awful job, especially on very busy, hot, mostly underground ones.
    I think for people who hate 9 to 5 work and who like to have a lot of time off its a pretty good job. Don't forget they get 8 weeks leave I believe.

    Plus they do have fans in the cab you know.
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    I have another story about my early days as a driver which I think is better than the other one but which I think is a bit unbelievable. But it's very true and I hope no one minds if I briefly tell it.

    When you were new you didn't always get the line you wanted and I was sent to train with a Metropolitan line driver for a day or two even though I knew nothing about Met trains.

    It was a very cold snowy winters day. In fact one of the worst days I was ever to experience in the job.

    It was also very early in the morning-about 6-20.

    We were meant to prepare a train for service and then take it to Wembley Park station from Neasdon depot. But it soon became clear that the train was struggling to move. Every time it slowly moved forward huge sparks would fill the still dark sky and if there'd been camera phones in those days I'm sure I'd have captured some stunning photos what with the snow still falling as well.

    Presently the driver went inside the carriage and got a paddle from under the seat which he handed to me. We both knew what that meant.I would have to get down on the track and scrape the ice off the live rail!

    I assure you that's normal procedure. Or at least it was.Obviously the paddle/scraper had a long wooden handle.But still. I was thinking, "So this is why I should have stayed on at school and completed my A Levels" Among other things.

    It was slow progress. I'd scrape for about 2 minutes then jump back on the train handing the driver the key he uses to drive the train which I held as a safety precaution. Then we'd try to move forward a bit more and then repeat the process.

    Anyway to keep it short,a journey that should have taken say 4 -5 minutes took nearly 25 minutes.

    But finally we reached Wembley Park.

    Whereupon the driver turned round and said, "Oh look!....
    Spoiler:
    Show
    ..."I've only gone and left the handbrake on"
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    I live in Paris and this happens sometimes with suburban trains here. It doesn't happen just because the driver forgot to stop (well, not always). Sometimes it also happens because drivers are supposed to leave at a certain time from such station and arrive at such time at the next, and if for some reason they arrive late at the terminus, the train operator (which is called the RATP) has to pay penalties. So the technique to avoid this is to jump stations.
    I'll be studing in the UK next year but I did my undergraduate degree in France, at a university near Paris which is called Nanterre. It's a fairly big town, so there are three different train stations including one just for the campus. Occasionally, one of these three stops is "forgotten".
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    It often feels like there are only about 5 trains a day on many London commuter routes. :cry2:
    One of the things that is overlooked is how appallingly bad many rail services were in the golden age of rail.

    There then were many more routes and many more stations but many of them had terrible service patterns. There might well be one train a day to Glasgow, but there would be only three or four to the nearest big town.

    Take Stoke on Trent for example. In 1910 it only had 3 direct trains a day to London. By 1951 that had risen to 6. There were only 6 direct trains to Birmingham and 7 to Manchester in 1910 with similar rises to 1951. By the 1970s heyday of BR, London and Birmingham had 11 and 10 trains a day respectively and Manchester had risen to 37.

    Stoke now has around 80 direct trains to London a day and around 80 to Manchester with 32 to Birmingham.

    Yet Stoke in 1910 was probably more important as a place than Stoke is today and there really was no other way for Mr Wedgwood to go up to London or for his reps to get anywhere or for the Tsar's agent to come to Stoke to negotiate for a new 1000 piece tea service.

    The same was true for most other places. Brighton or Cheltenham or Edinburgh might have good trains at all hours of the day or night but it is they which were the exception.

    Most places, no matter how big or small, that actually have a train service, have the best service along the routes that still exist, that they have ever done.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    One of the things that is overlooked is how appallingly bad many rail services were in the golden age of rail.

    There then were many more routes and many more stations but many of them had terrible service patterns. There might well be one train a day to Glasgow, but there would be only three or four to the nearest big town.

    Take Stoke on Trent for example. In 1910 it only had 3 direct trains a day to London. By 1951 that had risen to 6. There were only 6 direct trains to Birmingham and 7 to Manchester in 1910 with similar rises to 1951. By the 1970s heyday of BR, London and Birmingham had 11 and 10 trains a day respectively and Manchester had risen to 37.

    Stoke now has around 80 direct trains to London a day and around 80 to Manchester with 32 to Birmingham.

    Yet Stoke in 1910 was probably more important as a place than Stoke is today and there really was no other way for Mr Wedgwood to go up to London or for his reps to get anywhere or for the Tsar's agent to come to Stoke to negotiate for a new 1000 piece tea service.

    The same was true for most other places. Brighton or Cheltenham or Edinburgh might have good trains at all hours of the day or night but it is they which were the exception.

    Most places, no matter how big or small, that actually have a train service, have the best service along the routes that still exist, that they have ever done.
    Were there a great many more freight trains at that time? I can imagine there were, as most freight moved by rail, not road. Also of course the population was about 1/3 less in 1910 than it is now and presumably only the better off generally travelled the sort of long distances you are talking about - most factory workers stayed firmly put in their towns apart from the once a year trip to the seaside.
 
 
 
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