Males in Nursing? Should I do it?

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    As a qualified male nurse, think I'm pretty well placed to comment on this one Look, you're gunna get comments throughout your career about all sorts from "Why didn't you become a Dr?" to "Are you gay?" and anything in between. At first it seems like you've bitten off more than you can chew, but after a while you become used to it and just laugh it off - just don't be too oversensitive about things.All the girls I work with are incredibly accepting, and treat me as one of them. If anything, I think they quite like having a man around sometimes - it does give a different dynamic to a team. (Be prepared for lots of banter from the girls!)

    You have to be considerate of people's privacy in a slightly different way. Though this isn't something you will encounter much, I as a children's nurse always check with breastfeeding Mums that they are happy for me to be in the room while they are feeding as I am aware they may be particularly conscious about this - just an example. You have nothing to worry about, you'll be great!
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    As a qualified male nurse, think I'm pretty well placed to comment on this one Look, you're gunna get comments throughout your career about all sorts from "Why didn't you become a Dr?" to "Are you gay?" and anything in between. At first it seems like you've bitten off more than you can chew, but after a while you become used to it and just laugh it off - just don't be too oversensitive about things.All the girls I work with are incredibly accepting, and treat me as one of them. If anything, I think they quite like having a man around sometimes - it does give a different dynamic to a team. (Be prepared for lots of banter from the girls!)

    You have to be considerate of people's privacy in a slightly different way. Though this isn't something you will encounter much, I as a children's nurse always check with breastfeeding Mums that they are happy for me to be in the room while they are feeding as I am aware they may be particularly conscious about this - just an example. You have nothing to worry about, you'll be great!
    Thank you! That makes me feel a lot better about it. I was starting to worry i'd gone into the wrong career/ chosen the wrong degree, but I had to realise it was because of other peoples opinions and not my own

    I'll have to work on the oversensitive thing, that's kinda what got me asking this question sometimes I get offended too easily

    What would you say my chances of becoming a nurse practitioner are? I know you have to have many years experience and do a prescribing course/ additional qualifications in your chosen field to get onto masters degree courses in advanced nursing. I'm guessing it isn't easy though. Is this something that would be more highly paid (i've been told so)? As in is the extra work and time worth it in the end/ reflected in the salaries of people with masters? Of course pay wouldn't matter to me too much, patient satisfaction would, it is just a career progression i'm considering.

    Sorry for all the questions BTW
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    (Original post by PaediatricStN)
    As a qualified male nurse, think I'm pretty well placed to comment on this one Look, you're gunna get comments throughout your career about all sorts from "Why didn't you become a Dr?" to "Are you gay?" and anything in between. At first it seems like you've bitten off more than you can chew, but after a while you become used to it and just laugh it off - just don't be too oversensitive about things.All the girls I work with are incredibly accepting, and treat me as one of them. If anything, I think they quite like having a man around sometimes - it does give a different dynamic to a team. (Be prepared for lots of banter from the girls!)

    You have to be considerate of people's privacy in a slightly different way. Though this isn't something you will encounter much, I as a children's nurse always check with breastfeeding Mums that they are happy for me to be in the room while they are feeding as I am aware they may be particularly conscious about this - just an example. You have nothing to worry about, you'll be great!
    As a breastfeeding mum I couldn't give toss who saw me doing it! I had a male obstetrician. Twice. Patients ultimately don't care who's taking care of them. They just care you're doing a good job. But this gentleman makes an excellent point. As long as you're professional and sensitive, you'll be everything you need to be.*

    Good luck.*
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    (Original post by giella)
    As a breastfeeding mum I couldn't give toss who saw me doing it! I had a male obstetrician. Twice. Patients ultimately don't care who's taking care of them. They just care you're doing a good job. But this gentleman makes an excellent point. As long as you're professional and sensitive, you'll be everything you need to be.*

    Good luck.*
    Most parents really don't care, and are happy for me to come in and out of the room as I please. But equally, the fact I ask them I hope instills their confidence in me. That said, parents of certain religions do appreciate me asking, as they would prefer for me to knock first, to allow them to cover up, in accordance with their beliefs.
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    (Original post by L33t)
    Thank you! That makes me feel a lot better about it. I was starting to worry i'd gone into the wrong career/ chosen the wrong degree, but I had to realise it was because of other peoples opinions and not my own

    I'll have to work on the oversensitive thing, that's kinda what got me asking this question sometimes I get offended too easily

    What would you say my chances of becoming a nurse practitioner are? I know you have to have many years experience and do a prescribing course/ additional qualifications in your chosen field to get onto masters degree courses in advanced nursing. I'm guessing it isn't easy though. Is this something that would be more highly paid (i've been told so)? As in is the extra work and time worth it in the end/ reflected in the salaries of people with masters? Of course pay wouldn't matter to me too much, patient satisfaction would, it is just a career progression i'm considering.

    Sorry for all the questions BTW
    Nurse practitioner... It depends what area, really. They're typically Band 7 (Or possibly above) but you'd probably have to work in that area as a Band 6 first for a while - or even a Band 5. So you're unlikely to be able to go from being a Band 6 in A&E to a Band 7 Oncology nurse practitioner, for example.

    Nurse practitioners are on the Agenda for Change just like all other nurses. Pay may vary though, as some nurse practitioners will work 9-5 hours, whereas others such as those who work in A&Es will do unsocial hours too, and therefore will get the pay bonuses for that. I think you've kind of answered your own question there really... If you get a greater satisfaction out of being able to give better nursing care through doing a Masters or Advanced Nursing course, then yes it is worth it
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    Majority male nurses chose Mental health nursing than Adult nursing.
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    (Original post by Stavopage)
    Majority male nurses chose Mental health nursing than Adult nursing.
    That's simply not true. I am now studying my nursing degree and at my chosen university where 15/400 nurses are male and very few do mental health, from what I remember there are 3 doing mental health, 1 doing child nursing and the remaining 11 do adult. Besides the branch shouldn't matter as that's down to each individuals experience of care and various other often personal factors that drive their impulse into their chosen field
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    (Original post by L33t)
    That's simply not true. I am now studying my nursing degree and at my chosen university where 15/400 nurses are male and very few do mental health, from what I remember there are 3 doing mental health, 1 doing child nursing and the remaining 11 do adult. Besides the branch shouldn't matter as that's down to each individuals experience of care and various other often personal factors that drive their impulse into their chosen field
    I have to agree with you here.
    At my university we have 0 males in my year doing learning disability (3rd year) and only 1 in 1st year and 1 in 2nd year. For children's and mental health it is limited too. A handful of males if even.
    The majority are doing adult.
    But again this is because of their personal experiences and career aspirations.
    However, all fields need a nurse who is male. And not just for personal care. Males can offer a different perspective and a different rapport with patients.
    Males are needed! Regardless!

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    (Original post by deviant182)
    I have to agree with you here.
    At my university we have 0 males in my year doing learning disability (3rd year) and only 1 in 1st year and 1 in 2nd year. For children's and mental health it is limited too. A handful of males if even.
    The majority are doing adult.
    But again this is because of their personal experiences and career aspirations.
    However, all fields need a nurse who is male. And not just for personal care. Males can offer a different perspective and a different rapport with patients.
    Males are needed! Regardless!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    We don't have learning disability branch which is a shame really but yeh "most male nurses are MH nurses/ RMNs" is such a myth it's unreal.
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    (Original post by L33t)
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    I had this fear when I was thinking of starting my career in nursing but you'll be surprised just how many male nurses there really are out there. People today still question why I chose to be a nurse and for some reason they often perceive me to be the type to study physics or computers haha. However I think I bring something different to nursing and I am able to get through to some patients when others fail and you will be able to too. Go for it mate and if you have any questions feel free to PM me or reply here.
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    (Original post by deviant182)
    I have to agree with you here.
    At my university we have 0 males in my year doing learning disability (3rd year) and only 1 in 1st year and 1 in 2nd year. For children's and mental health it is limited too. A handful of males if even.
    The majority are doing adult.
    But again this is because of their personal experiences and career aspirations.
    However, all fields need a nurse who is male. And not just for personal care. Males can offer a different perspective and a different rapport with patients.
    Males are needed! Regardless!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    that said the with overall numbers of places for LD compared to MH or Adult , it;s not unknown for there to be intakes which are entirely female identifying ...
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    (Original post by L33t)
    I am male and currently hold a conditional offer to do Adult Nursing at a top UK university starting this September, but recently, although I am perfectly happy being a "male nurse" (I hate that term why attach gender to it?), I am starting to regret my decision. This is not because I wouldn't enjoy it or be happy with it as a career, but due to the reactions of others. I have had family members and friends bare face laugh and scoff at me/ question my motives. Teachers at school also weren't happy especially my maths teacher who had a serious problem with it and spent a good chunk of the year trying to persuade me not to do it, and even got my head of sixth-form involved! My head teacher once walked into our chemistry class of 6 males and went white as a sheet and looked shocked when our teacher told him what I was doing at uni. I think this is because I do chemistry and maths A-levels which they see as somehow "superior" to doing any degree like nursing (I also do English Language).I have done lots of work experience in care settings and have thoroughly enjoyed them. My career plan would be to be an RN for some years and then do a masters degree to become an advanced nurse practitioner working in general practice. My question is, would you discourage a male to go into nursing? If so, why? Any advice from current nursing students or otherwise would be appreciated

    -Tom
    Tom, if your passion is nursing, do it! Dont care what others think because its down to you, dont question yourself.

    Its not about how clever you are, or what gender, Its about personality and what you enjoy doing.

    There seems to be a mark that if someone is clever they have to be a doctor or lawyer, but that shouldnt be the case.
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    Do it. I'm currently on placement and my mentor is a male nurse, honestly he is the best mentor I've had. Really good at explaining things and testing me..he's a lot better than all the female nurses I've had in 3 years. Male nurses who are passionate about care are a gift from God.
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    How nice to read a thread where people have been supportive and informative without any snide comments or personal insults.

    If you want to be a male nurse, then just go for it - who cares what anyone else thinks about it!
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    How nice to read a thread where people have been supportive and informative without any snide comments or personal insults.

    If you want to be a male nurse, then just go for it - who cares what anyone else thinks about it!
    even been if you want to be a Nurse who is (or identifies as ) male ... semantics perhaps, but an important point ... we got rid of 'Male Nurses' in the early 1950s IIRC - when everyone was put onto the same register and the sub parts were by what we now call branch.
 
 
 
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