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S20 – Statement of Intent from the Secretary of State for Education Watch

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    (Original post by Aph)
    Doesn't nessesaraly lead to greater happiness, arguably it makes people less happy.
    You can't possibly be serious.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    You can't possibly be serious.
    IT increases the wealth gap, makes a bigger difference between the haves and have nots, drives poor people into poverty, makes people redundant ect. New technology, although being great for health ect. And for basic curiosities sake unless the population is cut globally in half will make people much less happy.

    I'd argue that a tribes person in Africa is much more happy than Dave down the pub is.
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    The metric/ imperial idea, although unusual but I think its important we get taught. Many people know their heights in ft and inches, their weights in stone and pounds; distances they drive in miles- this is naturally something they will need in later life, so it should be taught.

    The daily mile idea is very good; not only for exercise and to help reduce obesity, but helping pupil's concentration within classes, its a win win!
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    (Original post by JoeL1994)
    Sure, doesn't bother me.



    Where is the proof that STEM degrees go further than other degrees, considering the greater access to apprenticeships now?

    Have you got a list of approved STEM courses?

    Where's the estimation of £0.3bn from?

    Doesn't this essentially say to people doing medical/healthcare degrees that they are less important to society than those taking STEM courses?
    Whilst apprenticeships are gaining traction, we need to ensure that we continue to provide an excellent service in the STEM sectors. Not just for companies employing, but also to encourage young people to enter into these areas, and hopefully even make progress in these fields themselves, starting something new. This absolutely does not mean that other degrees are worthless - alas, I don't study a STEM degree, and this isn't something that will necessarily continue for ever.

    I will provide the link for list of STEM degrees, and the costing stuff later, as I said to TDA.

    How many people take up computer sciences as an A Level to make this worthwhile?

    Coding is irrelevant to most people in everyday life and this will just complicate things instead of focusing on basic IT skills.
    This isn't about introducing something new into the curriculum, as it's coming from September this year. It is something though, that can be very valuable for people applying to jobs, in a wider range of sectors than one may think, and something that we want to monitor so that we can look out for if the current structure isn't suitable and adjust.

    I am not entirely sure how many take it for A level at the moment, however, I hope it does increase.


    One mile daily? So what happens if it's 30 degrees outside in the sweltering heat? Or if it's snowing?
    What's to stop children being picked on for not being able to take part?
    I don't care if there's a zombie apocalypse - I expect them to be out there running. Maybe as the SoS I'll join a school for it one day
    Naturally there will be some who don't take part, and it's expected only those with a legit reason won't. Those who take the piss out of anyone, will be sent on a 10 mile run. That'll shut them up.

    Your last sentence is bull, as well. After the age of 10/11 and a child starts going to secondary school, parents lose more of a degree into what their child can eat. I don't believe this is necessary nor brings any more benefits than an increase in PE sessions that would at least increase teamwork/participation/communication/co-ordination.
    Not too sure about the bit about parents?! :confused: From my experience, PE lessons are not about running. Running a mile a day 5 times a week can have great physical benefits, and will help give those children a sense of routine, and hopefully get them to continue doing it once they stop at school.


    Aye, sure.


    Can't remember whose SoI this was in last but I know I helped with the costings for it, yours seem quite lenient considering the equipment you would need to teach a full BLS lesson with choke vests/Annie dolls and AEDs if this was included. Why teach BLS if you're going to do a half arsed job?
    It is a lenient costing, however, like everything, if we need to spend more money on it, we will. However, if we consider that schools can stagger it with others in vicinity, we would not need new sets of equipment for every single school.


    Sounds like a doss lesson like PSHE/Careers Ed. but yeah, why not.



    While I prefer imperial measurements, I think it's dying out regardless.


    Sure.



    Ofsted doesn't exist anymore in TSR land (B771).
    Honestly, I simply couldn't remember that! Let's rephrase it to say the ECQ will monitor them!
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    While I agree with the reduction of costs for STEM courses, I believe that it should be a long-run goal to reduce the cost of all university courses.

    However, the most effective way of reducing costs is to minimalize government in any given field. State-bureaucracy severly limits the development of competitiveness - including financial competitiveness.

    Non the less, it should be noted that a reduction in university costs is in everyones interest, including mine.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    But that's in the part referring to young children and the sentence about older children next to it suggests it doesn't apply to older children to ma.


    Doesn't nessesaraly lead to greater happiness, arguably it makes people less happy.


    I did read it and it's easy to miss when skimming. There is no need to be so confrontational.

    It specifically says that they should be taught to make choises which improve the economy...
    Yes, as it's hoped that giving them these tools will help them make rational decisions which will improve the economy. Like everything, you go with the law of averages, and hope that we help more make the rational decision than don't. And it's not saying they're going to spend all their money. But small things from a whole load of people can help.
    (Original post by adam9317)
    The metric/ imperial idea, although unusual but I think its important we get taught. Many people know their heights in ft and inches, their weights in stone and pounds; distances they drive in miles- this is naturally something they will need in later life, so it should be taught.

    The daily mile idea is very good; not only for exercise and to help reduce obesity, but helping pupil's concentration within classes, its a win win!
    Funny that
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    (Original post by Aph)
    We shouldn't be teaching imperial units IMO.
    Reducing tuition fees to STEM, unless met with extra money to unis will weaken them and unis will begin to struggle.
    Are we teaching students to put the UK economy above their own self interests? Really?!

    Having read the mile a day paragraph you seem to think that people in wheelchairs can do it too...
    Lastly you shouldn't make private tuition easier to access to fix holes in the state but fix those holes.
    I'm pretty sure being in a wheelchair would class a a reasonable reason not to run.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    Maybe some parents should be encouraged to join in? There should also be measures to actively encourage children who live under a mile to walk to school, with parents at younger ages.
    I am unsure if it exists outside of London but we have a program which I shall get the name of later which encourages once a week for parents and pupils to meet at a prearranged location, normally for my brother it is a local church, and they walk roughly a mile to school with their friends, parents and teachers. And if they do this every week for a month they get the badge for that month which has a unique design on.

    (Original post by Aph)
    But that's in the part referring to young children and the sentence about older children next to it suggests it doesn't apply to older children to ma.
    Seems pretty clear cut to me, as it is I disagree with the entire section, but I don't think this is a valid criticism of it. Maybe suggesting it would need either common sense of the teacher or failing that a doctor's note would be more valid.
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    I have no problem with grammar schools so long as the standards of all other schools are being maintained at a high standard. My fear is that other schools will be cast aside and all the focus on a few well performing schools with the illusion these minorities of schools are the majority.

    I really really rate the section regarding teaching kids to code. From my own experince , the computer science department ( as extremely minimal as it is ) at my school has had real problems at GCSE and at A-Level simply due to people struggling with the coding discipline. By aiding kids at a young(we) age it won't only help with sparking an interest but starting to teach them the skills that'll help at GCSE and A-Level. My hope is that it'll also urge schools to boost their computer science / ICT departments as from my experience they can be pretty lacklustre.

    However, I would say that at GCSE it's too late. It should start at a much earlier age. Alot of coding principles could be easily tied in with maths for example and this is something I would urge the government to pursue.

    Also with the economics bit , it would have to be ensured that the economics principles taught stay - like politics taught - neutral.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Yes, as it's hoped that giving them these tools will help them make rational decisions which will improve the economy. Like everything, you go with the law of averages, and hope that we help more make the rational decision than don't. And it's not saying they're going to spend all their money. But small things from a whole load of people can help.


    Funny that
    but they should be helping themselves not the economy, especially as they will barely benifit from a small increase in GDP.

    (Original post by joecphillips)
    I'm pretty sure being in a wheelchair would class a a reasonable reason not to run.
    I read being in a wheelchair as being reasonable for younger children but for older children they would be expected to do shorter distances.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    but they should be helping themselves not the economy, especially as they will barely benifit from a small increase in GDP.


    I read being in a wheelchair as being reasonable for younger children but for older children they would be expected to do shorter distances.
    That's like saying that me spending an extra £50 a year will make a massive difference. However, if we can educated a good number of people that it's not always about being for yourself, but sometimes doing a little bit for your country, then a collective effort will be good.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    That's like saying that me spending an extra £50 a year will make a massive difference. However, if we can educated a good number of people that it's not always about being for yourself, but sometimes doing a little bit for your country, then a collective effort will be good.
    People shouldn't put their country first. And all they would be doing is reading the fat cats.
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    This is mostly a good Statement of Intent but there are some issues, I do not support wasting a child's time by teaching the child baby economics which does not provide a useful tool in life, teaching budgeting is teaching common sense, and Ofsted does not exist in TSR.
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    I am impressed by this SoI, especially with the bits about coding, life skills and finance. However, I think the lowerng of STEM fees is just a token effort and I don't agree wit the section on running. There are much better ways of tackling child obesity.
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    I support most of these, but:

    reducing fees for STEM degrees make no sense

    There's currently no shortage of demands for STEM degrees and STEM courses don't currently suffer from low admission scores. Lowering fees will not lead to more graduates or higher quality graduates. So what's the point?

    I also don't think the STEM hype is justified to begin with. It doesn't even necessarily include medicine and there are shortage in many different fields not covered by STEM degrees.

    the government being a tutoring agency

    This really should just be left to the private sector, and there are many websites in the UK doing that at the moment already.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    IT increases the wealth gap, makes a bigger difference between the haves and have nots, drives poor people into poverty, makes people redundant ect. New technology, although being great for health ect. And for basic curiosities sake unless the population is cut globally in half will make people much less happy.

    I'd argue that a tribes person in Africa is much more happy than Dave down the pub is.
    Depends how it's used. The only way we'll ever prevent the world from becoming a furnace through global warming, for instance, is through research. Current technologies are obviously not good enough.

    Also, as I've said, increasing the wealth gap is not a bad thing per se. New technology doesn't drive people into poverty, and if it does, it's because of an insufficient welfare state/provision of retraining possibilities, not because of the technology itself.

    You'd be wrong. Being an African tribesman is a life of crushing misery. Life has never been so good for everyone in the western world, and it's all thanks to technological advancement.
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    (Original post by Galaxie501)
    While I agree with the reduction of costs for STEM courses, I believe that it should be a long-run goal to reduce the cost of all university courses.

    However, the most effective way of reducing costs is to minimalize government in any given field. State-bureaucracy severly limits the development of competitiveness - including financial competitiveness.

    Non the less, it should be noted that a reduction in university costs is in everyones interest, including mine.
    lol no, unless you take the absurd view that risk is not itself a cost. The free market thrives on creating externalities, tends to monopoly and there are economically sound reasons for regulation.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Depends how it's used. The only way we'll ever prevent the world from becoming a furnace through global warming, for instance, is through research. Current technologies are obviously not good enough.
    could abandon all technology and live an arboreal lifestyle...

    Also, as I've said, increasing the wealth gap is not a bad thing per se. New technology doesn't drive people into poverty, and if it does, it's because of an insufficient welfare state/provision of retraining possibilities, not because of the technology itself.
    it reduces happiness

    You'd be wrong. Being an African tribesman is a life of crushing misery. Life has never been so good for everyone in the western world, and it's all thanks to technological advancement.
    look at people in the western world, we take all we have for granted. We worry about insignificant issues and are generally constantly whining. Being a tribes man may be a life of misery, but you learn to appreciate the simple things, worry less and are more thankful and happy for what you have. You assume that money and quality of life make happiness when actually a happy life is more akin to a simple one.
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    (Original post by Aph)
    could abandon all technology and live an arboreal lifestyle...

    it reduces happiness


    look at people in the western world, we take all we have for granted. We worry about insignificant issues and are generally constantly whining. Being a tribes man may be a life of misery, but you learn to appreciate the simple things, worry less and are more thankful and happy for what you have. You assume that money and quality of life make happiness when actually a happy life is more akin to a simple one.
    Nah, I think you have unreasonable standards. Most people enjoy modern technology too much. You also have a picture coming from modern health standards. A life without modern technology is a constant struggle at the poverty line, likely to be cut short and constantly diseased.
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Nah, I think you have unreasonable standards. Most people enjoy modern technology too much. You also have a picture coming from modern health standards. A life without modern technology is a constant struggle at the poverty line, likely to be cut short and constantly diseased.
    I agree it would be a struggle but that's why it makes people happy!!! Because it brings people together and creates a better sense of community, and that's why makes people happier. If we lived in a colectivist society then technological progress would make happiness, but in an individualistic society it drives people Appart and makes them less happy.
 
 
 
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