Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I definitely think we're on the same page, CI seems right but feels wrong. It's one of those interpretations that is the best fit, but not the best model, it seems to throw up some things that we are unable to answer, and that to any scientist must feel like a real downer. I can't help feeling we could do better.

    We should really start another thread.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    Yeah, please do i mean ive read through both threads that have diverged its interesting stuff but probably best to put it in another thread. If you could please try keep to the topic of the thread that would be grand.
    Offline

    16
    (Original post by Sidhe)
    Quantum ChromoDynamics is not as simple as it at first seems
    LOL!
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I typed about 500 words on it then realised Id forgotten a hell of a lot about it so Ill summarise it in a few sentences.

    everything you see around you is a wavefunction, taking in dependant variables of space and time coordinates and spitting out a complex number. every particle has this function, defined over all of space and time where it can possibly be, giving an outcome similar to a complex temperature for example- a number for every position and time. these numbers are the defining attributes about the particle and describe everything it does- most weirdly, the likelyhood of you finding it in any one area (found by integrating the square of the function over the space you are going to look, and normalising). the wavefunctions all obey the schrodinger equation, an empirical invention.

    in a less mathematical sense, you have the fundemental heisenburg uncertainty principle which states the momentum and position of a particle cannot both be known to arbitrary accuracy, and their measurement accuracy product is limited by the planck constant (in the same axis- so you can know the x position well and y momentum well). also a similar (perhaps more fundemental) relationship exists between energy and time.

    the results of this are some things like diffraction- if a particle goes through a thin slit it is telling you its position to some detail. so its momentum in that direction is a bit randomised, and so the direction can change a little, causing diffraction patterns.

    similarly, because both energy and time cannot be measured to high accuracies, you can have weird things such as virtual particles, whose existence is hidden and also enabled by this principle which allows particles to come into existance and then dissapear, so long as the time they are around for is short enough so that they are unobservable and therefore do not violate anything.

    like I said I wrote a massive amount on quantum numbers and states and the scrodinger equation, if you really want to undertsand it you have to understand the maths I believe, because quantum mechanics without maths is meaningless- like in A-level, they can give you as many examples as you like to baffle the students, but it won't deepen understanding.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: July 28, 2007

University open days

  • University of Bradford
    All faculties Undergraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Buckinghamshire New University
    All Faculties Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
  • Heriot-Watt University
    All Schools Postgraduate
    Wed, 21 Nov '18
Poll
Black Friday: Yay or Nay?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.