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Has anybody successfully taught themselves Maths A-level in a year on TSR? watch

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    Self taught A-Level Maths, A-Level Further Maths and AS Level Physics in a two months, with about 2 hours a day, including 2 week holiday to Istanbul with no work done, a one week trip for interview at Cambridge with no work done and sat the exams in Jan, did pretty well. Taught A2 Physics from Jan to June alongside STEP Prep.
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    (Original post by ;66927128)
    Would you recommend self teaching for a candidate who got a B at GCSE because I'm considering paying for a taught maths a-level at a local sixth form
    Why did you only get a B at GCSE? Did you not work as hard as you could or did you find it difficult? What will you do differently for A level? The available data would suggest that with a B at GCSE you are statistically unlikely to do well at A level. The success of your plan is going to depend on you fixing your GCSE knowledge and then being a self motivated learner for A level. You know yourself best and need to decide if self study is going to be effective for you.


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    Just piggy-backing the thread...

    Anyone done AFM in a year? Is that particularly more difficult or easier? Supposing FM was already done. Modules FP3, S3, S4, M3, M4, M5.
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    (Original post by <InsertUsername>)
    If so please share below how you did it and the best way to do it, I'm interested in studying maths a-level as an adult candidate to improve my maths skills.
    I did A-Level Maths, and got my A*, in 2011, when I was ten years old; it was pretty easy to teach myself the content over about nine months. I could have gone quicker but I reasoned that I had time since there was a six-month gap between the January exam session, when I took the exams for C1 and C2, and the June exam session, when I did the remaining modules C3, C4, S1, and S2.

    Most of the stuff you learn in A-Level is not really applicable in real life and so it probably won't be useful to you unless you want to go to university to study maths. If you simply want to improve your grasp of basic arithmetic and algebra, which is what I suspect you mean, then what you need is a GCSE textbook that can be found at any good bookshop.
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    (Original post by gdunne42)
    Why did you only get a B at GCSE? Did you not work as hard as you could or did you find it difficult? What will you do differently for A level? The available data would suggest that with a B at GCSE you are statistically unlikely to do well at A level. The success of your plan is going to depend on you fixing your GCSE knowledge and then being a self motivated learner for A level. You know yourself best and need to decide if self study is going to be effective for you.


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    I was put in set 2 at high school but I really wanted to do the higher paper so I went to extra lessons during my lunch-break but the teacher doing it only taught B grade stuff and tbh B was all I was aiming for at the time

    I did AS physics and got C's in some modules and physics is harder than maths so I think I can do Maths AS at least
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    (Original post by HapaxOromenon3)
    I did A-Level Maths, and got my A*, in 2011, when I was ten years old; it was pretty easy to teach myself the content over about nine months. I could have gone quicker but I reasoned that I had time since there was a six-month gap between the January exam session, when I took the exams for C1 and C2, and the June exam session, when I did the remaining modules C3, C4, S1, and S2.

    Most of the stuff you learn in A-Level is not really applicable in real life and so it probably won't be useful to you unless you want to go to university to study maths. If you simply want to improve your grasp of basic arithmetic and algebra, which is what I suspect you mean, then what you need is a GCSE textbook that can be found at any good bookshop.
    Thanks, I've heard stuff about s2 being so easy you can teach it to yourself to an A* standard in a day but I'm not sure about the accuracy of that claim. I want to do it to help me at University with chemistry tbh
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    (Original post by dragonzrmetal)
    Just piggy-backing the thread...

    Anyone done AFM in a year? Is that particularly more difficult or easier? Supposing FM was already done. Modules FP3, S3, S4, M3, M4, M5.
    Not me, but I know people who have. No, it's not particularly more difficult or easier. It's all the same.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Self taught A-Level Maths, A-Level Further Maths and AS Level Physics in a two months, with about 2 hours a day, including 2 week holiday to Istanbul with no work done, a one week trip for interview at Cambridge with no work done and sat the exams in Jan, did pretty well. Taught A2 Physics from Jan to June alongside STEP Prep.
    feel like this thread was made for you :rofl:
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    I did Further Maths in 1 year, which is a bit different (in some ways easier because you've got experience with Maths A-level). There isn't any real kind of secret, you just work through the textbook and make sure that you're confident with each section, and get as much practice as you can in through past papers and textbook questions, or examsolutions videos if you're stuck. Also avoid mechanics if you just want to improve your maths skills - one stats and one decision or even two stats should suffice and should be fine for self teaching.
    is there any way to self teach mechanics
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    (Original post by bigmansouf)
    is there any way to self teach mechanics
    The same as self teaching any other module:
    Understand content->practice questions


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    (Original post by bigmansouf)
    is there any way to self teach mechanics
    Of course, just slightly more difficult in my opinion but it's all about choosing the most suitable modules for you anyway. In the OP's situation I would choose stats.
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    (Original post by Mathemagicien)
    I virtually self-taught a little more than A-level maths, and completely self-taught the other two maths A-levels. There is no secret. Best way to do it is understand the material, don't try to learn it by rote. Learn the proofs behind everything you can.

    Except if you are doing Decision Maths modules (DON'T DO THIS!!!), in which case don't bother trying to understand the reasoning (if any) behind things, and DO learn it by rote.

    But don't to decision maths. Or even statistics. Choose the mechanics modules. They hand out lots of marks for understanding, and are more interesting anyway.
    Whats so bad about decision, is it just hard?
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Self taught A-Level Maths, A-Level Further Maths and AS Level Physics in a two months, with about 2 hours a day, including 2 week holiday to Istanbul with no work done, a one week trip for interview at Cambridge with no work done and sat the exams in Jan, did pretty well. Taught A2 Physics from Jan to June alongside STEP Prep.
    alright then show off
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    (Original post by Hashtosh302)
    Whats so bad about decision, is it just hard?
    No, just really dull and unsatisfying for most- myself included


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    (Original post by Hashtosh302)
    Whats so bad about decision, is it just hard?
    lolling at this


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    (Original post by HapaxOromenon3)
    I did A-Level Maths, and got my A*, in 2011, when I was ten years old; it was pretty easy to teach myself the content over about nine months. I could have gone quicker but I reasoned that I had time since there was a six-month gap between the January exam session, when I took the exams for C1 and C2, and the June exam session, when I did the remaining modules C3, C4, S1, and S2.

    Most of the stuff you learn in A-Level is not really applicable in real life and so it probably won't be useful to you unless you want to go to university to study maths. If you simply want to improve your grasp of basic arithmetic and algebra, which is what I suspect you mean, then what you need is a GCSE textbook that can be found at any good bookshop.
    (Original post by Zacken)
    Self taught A-Level Maths, A-Level Further Maths and AS Level Physics in a two months, with about 2 hours a day, including 2 week holiday to Istanbul with no work done, a one week trip for interview at Cambridge with no work done and sat the exams in Jan, did pretty well. Taught A2 Physics from Jan to June alongside STEP Prep.
    Hahahahahaha
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    (Original post by ;66937540)
    I was put in set 2 at high school but I really wanted to do the higher paper so I went to extra lessons during my lunch-break but the teacher doing it only taught B grade stuff and tbh B was all I was aiming for at the time

    I did AS physics and got C's in some modules and physics is harder than maths so I think I can do Maths AS at least
    Those are good signs that with hard work and the right help you have a good chance of success. AS is certainly a realistic target and who knows after that but you will find out what your potential could be by doing the AS. If I had to guess, I'd say doing it as a class or with private tutor support would be the best way for you to go.


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