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    Both?
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    (Original post by TOTB)
    Just a quick question and your opinions please.

    Of the two, which would you prefer on your CV?

    - Evidence of entrepreneurial talent, eg. starting a small side business for example.

    Or

    - Evidence of investing in the stock market and doing well (And I mean, making thousands of £ in profit).

    Before anyone goes nuts, I can back up the latter option.

    I'm sure either would be a great positive on one's CV?
    The latter. Because it demonstrates interest, relevant work experience, and perhaps even an aptitude.
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    Being an entrepreneur doesn't have much to do with being an analyst at an investment bank. Sure, it'll look nice on a CV, but if you're really after entrepreneurship, this probably isn't the career path for you.
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    Being an entrepreneur doesn't have much to do with being an analyst at an investment bank. Sure, it'll look nice on a CV, but if you're really after entrepreneurship, this probably isn't the career path for you.
    Is there a career that lends itself to entrepreneurship?

    And the later is extremely dubious unless you uniquely sophisticated. In which case, that is far more suitable and it would be obvious.

    Punting on the back of hunches into spreads or cash equity or some other retail product to any trader would just be seen as you running your luck.

    I do think both can be laid out.
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    Evidence of investing in the stock market and doing well (And I mean, making thousands of £ in profit
    Say that in your interview and your interviewer will know you're an amateur. "Thousands in profit" is meaningless. Percentages and time frames in which you acheived them are the key, as well as your risk statistics.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    Say that in your interview and your interviewer will know you're an amateur. "Thousands in profit" is meaningless. Percentages and time frames in which you acheived them are the key, as well as your risk statistics.
    I think mahras is the only 'kid' I've come across who has genuinely invested at a young age, properly. I wonder where is he now. And how minted he is.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    I think mahras is the only 'kid' I've come across who has genuinely invested at a young age, properly. I wonder where is he now. And how minted he is.
    The whizz kid from the Other Place? What was his performance like, everyone always talked about his skills...
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    At UNSW there is a crazy guy who has won the ASX share competition since around age 10 or so. He works part time as a Prop trader for an IB =/
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    The whizz kid from the Other Place? What was his performance like, everyone always talked about his skills...
    Very good. Mostly momentum based and gave something of a Martingale effect because it was effective at finding momentum the way you wanted it without the risk of it going the other way.

    This was on a monthly published list of 5 cash equities.

    His performance in spot fx and fx options was harder to get a view on because he didn't publish his p&l every session
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    (Original post by bally)
    At UNSW there is a crazy guy who has won the ASX share competition since around age 10 or so. He works part time as a Prop trader for an IB =/
    Sounds like luck for when he was 10. If he's that good, why would he bother being at uni or being anything less a full time prop trader or fund manager?

    He'd have some very warped preferences to think sticking around in uni is a good trade to make on his endowment of precious time...
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    With all due respect, if he started investing in 2004 - now, its not very diffucult to make money on equities. As long as you kept away from the penny stocks.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Sounds like luck for when he was 10. If he's that good, why would he bother being at uni or being anything less a full time prop trader or fund manager?

    He'd have some very warped preferences to think sticking around in uni is a good trade to make on his endowment of precious time...
    Yes but some people do want to go to university for the sake of further education and broadening of the mind, not just as a path to riches. It does happen believe me.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Very good. Mostly momentum based and gave something of a Martingale effect because it was effective at finding momentum the way you wanted it without the risk of it going the other way.

    This was on a monthly published list of 5 cash equities.

    His performance in spot fx and fx options was harder to get a view on because he didn't publish his p&l every session
    Sounds like an interesting chap, do you know anything else about him?
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    (Original post by Mikesev)
    Sounds like an interesting chap, do you know anything else about him?
    As in his favourite colour? No.

    What do you want to know?
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    (Original post by simon123)
    Yes but some people do want to go to university for the sake of further education and broadening of the mind, not just as a path to riches. It does happen believe me.
    So you've been a hotshot stock picker since the age of 10 and somehow, you think university is the right move to make?

    Don't think so.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    So you've been a hotshot stock picker since the age of 10 and somehow, you think university is the right move to make?

    Don't think so.
    Yes but you dont know the details of anything to do with this case. Maybe infact this kid wanted to give himself a wider theoretical understanding of economics, or classics for that matter. In terms of earnings I am agreeing with you however I am just making the point not everyone goes to university with the sole goal of increasing earnings power. There is such a thing as education for educations sake, a chance to widen your knowledge and open your mind to areas that interest you.
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    (Original post by President_Ben)
    Is there a career that lends itself to entrepreneurship?

    And the later is extremely dubious unless you uniquely sophisticated. In which case, that is far more suitable and it would be obvious.

    Punting on the back of hunches into spreads or cash equity or some other retail product to any trader would just be seen as you running your luck.

    I do think both can be laid out.
    Most analysts aren't traders.

    You could choose a career that give you more free time so that you can work on your business plan. Or do the Big 4 so you can get an accounting qualification.
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    (Original post by shady lane)
    You could choose a career that give you more free time so that you can work on your business plan. Or do the Big 4 so you can get an accounting qualification.
    Do you really think the ACA makes people better at running a business?
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    No, I don't. But a potential investor might.
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    (Original post by MonteCristo)
    Say that in your interview and your interviewer will know you're an amateur. "Thousands in profit" is meaningless. Percentages and time frames in which you acheived them are the key, as well as your risk statistics.
    Well if you want me to go into more detail, I achieved a 273% return over a 3-year time span (between 2001-2004). And I am aware that I did take advantage of the bear market in 2000. I know I won't achieve gains like this until the next bear market, unless I really know my ****, which is really doubtful, because I really do not know that much.

    And I achieved this with a FTSE 100 company. I prefer to keep it simple and analyse the big boys.

    Of course, I did this for making money for moi! If it's not much in an IB interview, then fair play...

    I am not claiming to be an investing genius, but something is better than nothing. All I know is that I have lots to learn.
 
 
 
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