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    Just stop breathing as there is no real point in that.
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    (Original post by hxfsxh)
    But what about analysing, interpreting etc? Those are key skills needed in day to day life, that are key for socialising.and also are skills regarded as "important" and "necessary" by employers.
    And lets be honesty, you wouldnt watch the History channel out of choice.
    Yeah, I suppose it fine tunes your basic skills, but perhaps they could make it more fun. Change the content to something more exciting like analyzing crime stories instead of history, geography...etc

    You know, something everybody loves and is fun. Instead of this outdated memorization of facts which aren't necessary anymore thanks to Google.

    Google beats any University Professer to hell
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    I think Stephen Fry sums it up pretty well.
    Skip to 5:00 if the video doesn't do it for you.

    https://youtu.be/QZmpvZwN5SU?t=302
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    (Original post by candymonster)
    As I'm filling my head with useless boring facts requiring an insane amount of time

    For example, 99.9% of the math I'm learning I'm never going to use unless I want to be a scientist or a professor doing research

    I just want a nice comfortable job in the future without having to slog my way memorizing facts that are useless to me in the future and in most jobs I'd probably be interested in

    Can you change my perspective? Is there any value in education for me that I'm not aware of?
    You're approaching education from a purely 'black or white' approach. You're right in assuming that a lot of the things you learn are not necessarily applicable to the real world. But from someone who has been working for nearly ten years post-graduation, I can tell you that even today, it matters. Where you studied may not matter, but the fact that you have a degree makes a difference, especially for those who want to climb the corporate ladder.

    It may not help you to have a degree, but I do think it may hold you back should you not have one.
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    (Original post by candymonster)
    Which skills? I can read, write and calculate. Seems enough for me for a comfy office job.

    For History, I can just watch the History channel.
    I love school and the idea of school a lot. I also can't wait for uni!
    Education gives you more than the information and details you find adequate; skills that you don't learn through books.
    Like maths; importance of consistency and practice.
    Biology; you learn techniques of retaining knowledge and applying them appropriately.
    English literature; managing time and mastering your style of writing.
    On whole, exams are a valuable concept as well:
    It teaches you to manage time, to keep track of your thoughts and revision.
    It also helps you know the importance of constant motivation and perseverance.
    The list can sort of go on and on
    And yeah. This is invaluable, if you ask me. And we should also deem ourselves lucky to get an education, because some poor soul out there is not as lucky
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I find life pointless because you die anyway
    But its what contribution you make to the Earth while you are here ,no matter how small it is.Think of your life as simply paying rent to humanity and the Earth .
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    Try to contextualise what you're learning and relate it to real life
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    (Original post by Blackstarr)
    Maths and history are pointless at any level because history tends to repeat it self anyway and maths is not needed beyond basic numeracy unless you want to become specialised in maths.

    Edit: That being said, you need to be educated regardless of what subject will be useful to you in your career.

    If you are abroad, you should not take education for granted and make the most of it.
    Definitely not true for maths.If you are going to something like sciences or engineering,you are going to need more than BIDMAS .Alot of our advances in medicine,science and technology are aided by new maths.
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    Education is good for expanding your knowledge in a particular or even vast field of subjects that might be relevant for the job you're in.

    Even if there isn't specifics, as a lot have said it gives you skills that are transferable. For example, doing projects, working in teams, reading and retaining information, keeping up to date with information (e.g. economics accounts etc) all have important roles when employers hire you.*
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    (Original post by Kadak)
    Definitely not true for maths.If you are going to something like sciences or engineering,you are going to need more than BIDMAS .Alot of our advances in medicine,science and technology are aided by new maths.
    Yes but bar that.
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    (Original post by candymonster)
    As I'm filling my head with useless boring facts requiring an insane amount of time

    For example, 99.9% of the math I'm learning I'm never going to use unless I want to be a scientist or a professor doing research

    I just want a nice comfortable job in the future without having to slog my way memorizing facts that are useless to me in the future and in most jobs I'd probably be interested in

    Can you change my perspective? Is there any value in education for me that I'm not aware of?
    mate education is not the same as school
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xe6nLVXEC0
    makes sence
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    (Original post by candymonster)
    As I'm filling my head with useless boring facts requiring an insane amount of time

    For example, 99.9% of the math I'm learning I'm never going to use unless I want to be a scientist or a professor doing research

    I just want a nice comfortable job in the future without having to slog my way memorizing facts that are useless to me in the future and in most jobs I'd probably be interested in

    Can you change my perspective? Is there any value in education for me that I'm not aware of?
    Well tbh I do see where you're coming from, in that some things you just have to pointlessly memorise for an exam when it's simple to just look them up. So I would say the education system needs some reforming. As others above have said tho, you do gain and build upon skills too.

    However, for me personally the biggest benefits of my education so far have been:

    1. Learnt about a wide variety of subjects, which helped me to discover my true passions and to have my own dreams for the future and a purpose in life.

    2. Learnt a lot of information, which helps me to look at things from different perspectives, and I think has made me naturally read widely about a topic that I'm interested in to understand it fully.

    3. Gave me self-confidence that when I strive for something and give it my best, I can achieve it, even when others doubt me. Working for something and it paying off is very fulfilling.
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    (Original post by candymonster)
    As I'm filling my head with useless boring facts requiring an insane amount of time

    For example, 99.9% of the math I'm learning I'm never going to use unless I want to be a scientist or a professor doing research

    I just want a nice comfortable job in the future without having to slog my way memorizing facts that are useless to me in the future and in most jobs I'd probably be interested in

    Can you change my perspective? Is there any value in education for me that I'm not aware of?
    There is a value to parts of it yes but what your learning now a lot of it isn't going to be useful but parts of it will come in useful particularly if your an accountant or something maths like long multiplication will be useful.

    However the education system is deeply flawed and does need to be reformed. This guy actually explains it pretty well.

    I also think maths should be split into numeracy and maths not only would this show people a difference and get them interested in maths is interesting but it would also help highlight students who may have discalcula.

    discalcula student says:
    I'm good at maths i'm just not very numeric.
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    (Original post by candymonster)
    As I'm filling my head with useless boring facts requiring an insane amount of time

    For example, 99.9% of the math I'm learning I'm never going to use unless I want to be a scientist or a professor doing research

    I just want a nice comfortable job in the future without having to slog my way memorizing facts that are useless to me in the future and in most jobs I'd probably be interested in

    Can you change my perspective? Is there any value in education for me that I'm not aware of?
    Education certainly isn't useless.

    From a societal point of view, compare countries with good education systems with those without. There's a very clear correlation between education and wealth:



    Well, that might be because they're wealthy so they spend more on education. But to ignore the advantages of education on society and societies wealth is mad.

    If you're talking basic education, like learning to read, write, do mathematics, there's lots of data that education has huge benefits including decreasing infant mortality, child mortality, improves child nutrition, reduces child marriages, faster economic growth, it's better for the environment.

    But I'm guessing you're talking about more developed countries education, so beyond the basics of reading and writing?

    Well, there's huge advantages to that too. You're unemployment rate (taking the US as an example) decreases at each stage of education. People with degrees are more employed than those with associate degree, who are more employed than those who graduated high-school, who are more employed than those that didn't. The median US college educated worker earns 84 percent more than someone with only a high school education.

    There's lots of evidence this is a causal relationship.

    There's social advantages of having a more education population. There's more people who can contribute to research, inventions, and discoveries. Looking through history, until education systems were in place the world struggled to advance much. Since developed countries have started educating people wealth, technology, and social progress has skyrocketed.

    Okay, okay, I get it. You still don't want to learn maths right? You don't want to be a math's professor.

    Well, there's thousands more professions that use maths. Anything to do with finance, engineering (my god, engineering maths is far more complex than what you're doing now), statistics, science research (all areas of science require a knowledge of maths, especially statistics) medicine...

    If you didn't do maths, you're blocking out a huge number of careers that are crucial for our society to function. All of them require complex maths, but the complex maths is built upon a base of knowledge that is built up in schools. You can't "skip" the middle step and learn the complex stuff without spending years learning the simple stuff.

    And it's not just facts. You're not training your brain to remember your times tables, your training your brain to remember.

    The goal of school isn't to make sure you come out knowing a set of facts, it's to train your brain. Brains work much like muscles, in that they are developed using repetition and work. You're learning to learn.

    You're also seeing what you're good at. You might hate maths, but you don't know until you've gone through the basics.

    There's also another important role of education: Classifying you. Ranking you. Our education system is designed to boil you down into a handful of letters (A,B,C etc) and numbers. Why is this useful? It has one ultimate use: Getting you a job.

    The economy runs on work. That's why you hear so much about employment statistics whenever the economy is discussed. Higher skilled, higher paid, more productive jobs are better for society. And these are performed by highly educated people. Highly educated people are classified by their grades (until they have enough work experience).

    Employers want the best they can get. If they have two candidates in front of them, both great at the english skills they need (for, say, writing news articles, if the employer is a newspaper) well - how do they decide?

    Would you pick the one with an F in Maths and History, or an A? Even though it's not super relevant to the role - it has marginal advantages. They might understand more of the financial news and statistics, or the historical context to conflicts and thus be a better reporter.

    Why go for someone with less knowledge and skills than the one with more?

    Education, for an individual is a big competition where you're trying to do the best you can to increase your employment prospects and future earnings.

    Education, from a societal point of view is to push for more economic output and societal advancement.
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    I just spent half an hour writing a comment with sources explaining the benefits of education and TSR just came up with an error and wiped it. Great.

    From a personal point of view. Learning things you're not going to use: You never really do this. You learn things to use in an exam.

    Exams are basically used to rank you again other people. Being ranked higher makes you more desirable as an employee (or as a student in further education). Being more desirable gives you more opportunities, higher pay etc.

    Some basic understanding of maths and english is important in so many fields. But what about other things, like History etc? Well, as an employer I might not care about the facts you've learned about Henry the 8th. So why do I care about your history grade? Well, it shows me you can read sources, analyse them and remember important facts for an event. It shows me you can recall these under pressure and write critical essays. That's stuff I'd find advantageous in any job.

    From a societal point of view, more educated people drive the economy more, drive innovation and technological advancement. They're healthier, live longer and more productive lives, have less children and cost less in benefits and support and provide more tax.

    You might not to need to know these facts, but you need to show you're intelligent.
 
 
 
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