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    I don't understand..? :p:
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    They are graded Distinction, Merit, or Unclassified (ie fail).
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    -AEA stands for Advanced Extension Award
    -Each subject is only offered by one exam board, but it makes no difference whether you do a different exam board for A-level
    -They're not available in all subjects
    -They're aimed at the top 10% of A-level students, so you should be aiming for an A, and most people take them at the end of Year 13, but it's possible to take them at the end of Year 12 as well if you want
    -They're graded Distinction or Merit (or obviously Ungraded) and the pass rate is about 50%
    -They're based on the A-level, but with questions designed to make you think more, so you can't revise for them and the only preparation you can really do is specimen/past papers
    -It's one 3 hour exam
    -Most people have never even heard of them and you're very unlikely to be made an offer based on them, so they don't really count for much. A pass would be very impressive though and it's actually an enjoyable exam because it's nice to be challenged in a subject you're passionate about, especially if you intend to study it at uni. It sretches you and shows you what you're capable of
    -You can ask your teachers because they can advise you on whether you should do it, anything you could do to prepare, the format of the exam etc etc, but if they just stare at you blankly and don't have a clue what you're talking about, you can ask your exams officer to enter you

    I did the French AEA, by the way, so feel free to post here or PM me with any questions Oh, and there's only one English AEA- you just choose which questions you do depending on whether you study lang, lit or combined.
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    AEAs are Advanced Extension Awards. They're taken by the top 10% of students (normally at the end of year 13) in the A-Level subjects which have a large number of people getting As. I did one in French and didn't find it too difficult, so you should go for that one. Granted, the writing this year was a pain in the but, however I found it very manageable indeed, and intend on doing the German one next Summer
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    (Original post by chewing_phat)
    A friend got an AA + Merit offer for English at Cambridge.
    Cambridge. No real surprise there. They always have to be the odd one out.
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    So why doesn't everyone sit this AEA if they have nothing to lose anyway?
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    (Original post by Parrothead88)
    So why doesn't everyone sit this AEA if they have nothing to lose anyway?
    Partly because it's not aimed at everyone, only the top 10% of the country, and also because it is an 'extra' exam that is not compulsory and who likes exams? I personally chose to sit them because I enjoy my subjects and wanted the challenge.
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    So if you sit one and fail, do universities know that? Otherwise there is no risk attached anyway and the exam is no stress, you can walk in and completely fail.. No worries!

    But i understand what you're saying about the top 10% of people. AEAs aren't really advertised very well either, most people who probably could do one have no idea what it is :/
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    (Original post by Parrothead88)
    So if you sit one and fail, do universities know that? Otherwise there is no risk attached anyway and the exam is no stress, you can walk in and completely fail.. No worries!

    But i understand what you're saying about the top 10% of people. AEAs aren't really advertised very well either, most people who probably could do one have no idea what it is :/
    Universities will not know that you have been entered for them unless you have included them in your UCAS application. I didn't so they will not know whether I pass or fail it. If I happen to not get the grades for my offer, however, and did happen to get a Distinction in the AEA, I could use this to persuade my uni to let me in.

    However, as it is rare for a university to stipulate that you pass the AEA, you could include it in your UCAS application as it will impress them. I only sat the AEAs because my teachers approached me about them. Very few people take them. Here are the entry numbers for 2004: http://education.guardian.co.uk/alev...285758,00.html. As you can see, only 155 people took the German one that year.
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    Ahhh i see, thanks a lot
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    i was looking at the maths score. i assume U is fail. so essentially 70% of maths candidates fail it.
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    (Original post by Parrothead88)
    Ahhh i see, thanks a lot
    No problem .

    (Original post by hermaphrodite)
    i was looking at the maths score. i assume U is fail. so essentially 70% of maths candidates fail it.
    Yes you can either get a Distinction, Merit or Fail in the AEA. There is no Pass unlike GNVQ. The standard is indeed high and only 10% achieve the top grade. That's 10% of a selection of the top 10% of the country for whatever subject it is.
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    (Original post by Parrothead88)
    So why doesn't everyone sit this AEA if they have nothing to lose anyway?
    It costs money to enter students for exams.
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    (Original post by MaryMoo)
    It costs money to enter students for exams.
    any idea what the costs are?
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    It's certainly interesting food for thought that even after the fact that we have an AEA which really does distinguish the best of the best, just looking at the figures of the number of people who apply to do AEAs and those that even get anything, merit or distinction, that the government still feels the need to introduce the A* grade at A-Level for those taking A2s in 2010 :confused:

    And i thought the government paid for the papers, otherwise there's no incentive for schools to apply pupils with the ability to sit an AEA.
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    (Original post by Parrothead88)
    It's certainly interesting food for thought that even after the fact that we have an AEA which really does distinguish the best of the best, just looking at the figures of the number of people who apply to do AEAs and those that even get anything, merit or distinction, that the government still feels the need to introduce the A* grade at A-Level for those taking A2s in 2010 :confused:

    And i thought the government paid for the papers, otherwise there's no incentive for schools to apply pupils with the ability to sit an AEA.
    Yes I don’t think schools/colleges have to pay for them since only a handful of candidates per centre actually sit them. I cannot see the point in introducing an A* grade either; surely it would be better to advertise AEAs better than introduce a new grade that will diminish the value of the existing A-grade and put students under more pressure to do well. AEAs are designed to distinguish the best from the best and should be made more widely available.
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    do u know the cost; just curious
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    (Original post by hermaphrodite)
    any idea what the costs are?
    Probably £20ish like normal A-level modules.
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    (Original post by hermaphrodite)
    do u know the cost; just curious
    No. I've tried searching on Google but it hasn't come up with anything.
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    Don't quote me on this, but I think the cost is more than for A-level exams, around £35, and the school/college does have to pay. The reasons they're not taken by many people include the fact that most people have never even heard of them, it's extremely rare for them to be needed for uni, they don't give you any real advantage, they require sitting an extra exam that's twice as long as a lot of A-level exams, they're taken later than the majority of A-level exams and hence prolong the exam period, and possibly because some schools/colleges may refuse to pay for them. If you put them on your UCAS form, your result will presumably be sent to unis along with your A-levels, but if you don't, unis won't know either that you entered for one or what you got.
 
 
 

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