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    If you are actually looking for a career with high salary then i advice doing petroleum engineer. Out of all the engineers they have the highest starting salary
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    Sigh.

    You can't logic yourself into wanting to do medicine. Either you want to do it or you don't. Do some work experience, read the TSR Medicine Wiki and figure out if it's something you actually want to do. It's not just a (very long) degree, it's an entire career.
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    This thread seems fairly one-sided in saying that you should only do Medicine if you have a passion for it and want to spend the rest of your life being a doctor etc. I'd like to pose an alternative viewpoint...

    I think that if you've got the grades, and you think Medicine would be a cool thing to do a 5/6 year course in, then go for it. There's no need to have a pre-existing passion for the subject - rather, you can cultivate a passion for the subject once you start studying it.

    Have a read of this article (http://www.theminimalists.com/cal/) about how 'Follow your passion' is bad advice - it's an interesting read and might help shed some light on your situation.

    When I applied to medical school, I didn't really have a 'passion' for medicine or a burning desire to be a doctor. I had decent grades, knew I liked science, and thought medicine seemed cool. Having just entered my fifth year at Cambridge, I can honestly say that applying was absolutely the right decision for me, despite not having a pre-existing passion. I've absolutely loved studying the subject, I think our course is amazing, and the last year of clinical medicine (hanging out with doctors in the hospital, talking to patients, taking blood etc) has been super fun. I've developed a passion for medicine over the past few years, and would really like to continue with it and become (I think/hope) a surgeon.

    Quite a lot of students I've met at Cambridge have had similar experiences - of having decent grades and deciding to apply to Medicine, not really knowing whether they'd want to be doctors for the rest of their life. Some of those students left after 3 years to pursue careers in banking, pharmaceuticals, teaching etc, but most of them have cultivated a passion for medicine over their time at university, and now know that they want to be doctors.

    So I'd suggest that if you have the grades and think studying medicine would be cool, then go for it The great thing about medicine is that there are literally hundreds of paths that become open to you - if you decide at the end of it that you want to be a doctor/physician/surgeon, then perfect. If not, you're completely within your rights to use your medical degree to go into healthcare policy, education or medical law, or even something entirely unrelated like management consultancy.

    Just my two cents

    -Ali
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    (Original post by Pudge666)
    If you are actually looking for a career with high salary then i advice doing petroleum engineer. Out of all the engineers they have the highest starting salary
    Petroleum engineers will be out of a job soon!. Cos it relies on one thing: petrol !
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    Nope, definitely not. Medicine isn't about "good money", it's about genuinely feeling a moral duty to bettering humanity. If you don't have a strong passion for medicine, you'll find your placement years in hospitals very arduous and menial tasks (like blood taking, ward rounds and overnight on-call shifts) very taxing, prompting you to withdraw from this career. Maybe you could take part in some job shadowing stints to get a feel of what it's like. I did a couple and boy, was it tough. Good luck though! I considered biochemistry too but I just couldn't see myself there haha
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    (Original post by UKCATrocks)
    Petroleum engineers will be out of a job soon!. Cos it relies on one thing: petrol !
    Not really, as the artic ocean ice is melting due to climate change, there were evidence of a potential 50 tons of barrel of oil inside the water , which is why there a lot of tension between countries for it. For example Russia claimed lomonosov ridge which their scientist said they found evidence of oil underneath but also demnark wants part of it as well
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    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    I'm unsure if I want to do chemistry/biochemistry/medicine. My friends that want to do medicine who got lower grades than me think I should just do medicine. It would also have a more solid career path
    Only do medicine if you are passionate about it, you need to have a caring, empathetic personality with a willingness to work hard and work long hours to get far in medicine.
    If you are trying to do medicine just because you have got the grades and you are not that passionate then 5/6 years of incredibly hard work is not going to be enjoyable for you.

    Sit down and imagine where you see yourself in 10 years time, look at the medicine courses and see whether its a career for you. If you want to know about what its like to study medicine then I am going into second year so you can ask me.
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    (Original post by ShadowStorm689)
    I'm unsure if I want to do chemistry/biochemistry/medicine. My friends that want to do medicine who got lower grades than me think I should just do medicine. It would also have a more solid career path
    Originally when I applied for sixth form I was considering doing biology, chemistry, physics and maths as my A levels (did all those to AS in the end, but physics maths and further maths to A2), and the first thing they asked as I had fairly good GCSE grades whether or not I was going to do medicine.

    I corrected them and said engineering. I had considered medicine by that point, and although I was interested in biology, medicine and being a doctor was not for me (I am more interested in the technological side). I am now about to start studying engineering in Cambridge, with the intent on specialising in biomedical engineering in the third and fourth years.

    I also know several other people who got A*s who are going for various engineering degrees, maths etc. Either way, point is, just because you have high grades in the maths and science subjects does not automatically mean you have to do medicine if you are not sure you are interested in it.
 
 
 
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