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Feel like students are very negative about jobs after university?! Watch

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    (Original post by john2054)
    Good point. I worked hard at uni for my degree, and now i can't find a job for the life of me. So am considering post graduate study. Sounds about right...
    If you're struggling to find a job then using a postgrad course as a last resort is not the way to go, unless the jobs you want to apply for specifically require a Masters.

    I suggest some work experience (e.g. charity shop) to boost your CV. At the end of it, a Masters is just a piece of paper, whereas it'll be the work experience that gets you a job.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    If you're struggling to find a job then using a postgrad course as a last resort is not the way to go, unless the jobs you want to apply for specifically require a Masters.

    I suggest some work experience (e.g. charity shop) to boost your CV. At the end of it, a Masters is just a piece of paper, whereas it'll be the work experience that gets you a job.
    thanks but i have also been banned from working at all the charity shops in derby. nice idea though?
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    If you're struggling to find a job then using a postgrad course as a last resort is not the way to go, unless the jobs you want to apply for specifically require a Masters.

    I suggest some work experience (e.g. charity shop) to boost your CV. At the end of it, a Masters is just a piece of paper, whereas it'll be the work experience that gets you a job.
    Agreed 100%.

    Do something vocational OR get work exp/internships during your course. Failing that, volunteer after uni if you can't get paid work and seriously consider what you actually want to do and how to achieve it.

    A 2.1 in most non-vocational subjects will get you absolutely nowhere without work experience to back it up. Employers want real life skills and experience - not just a piece of paper.



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    (Original post by BabyLadDarren)
    you act as if people that don't have internship/part time jobs/work experience didn't try.

    reality is loads of people apply from the their second year, fail and apply in their third year then fail again ending up out of uni with no job.

    sure there are people that don't 'try' but many do and are still in that position.
    (Original post by BabyLadDarren)
    you act as if people that don't have internship/part time jobs/work experience didn't try.

    reality is loads of people apply from the their second year, fail and apply in their third year then fail again ending up out of uni with no job.

    sure there are people that don't 'try' but many do and are still in that position.
    Whilst internships and part time jobs are competitive to get, you can get more informal work experience without having to go through a competitive application process. My most recent work experience came through volunteering for a charity. I emailed saying I was interested, they said ok come in and meet us, I went in and they went 'how many days a week can you volunteer for and when can you start.' It doesn't have to be 100% relevant to what you want to do to help either.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    You should be applying for part time jobs/work experience as soon as you turn 16. Second year of uni is way to late to start applying for these roles.

    Internships, yes - but it's the previous experience that often gets you the internship. So if someone who hasn't bothered getting a part time job is rejected from an internship then that's on them.
    :lol: haha please..... what company is going to hire a 16 year old with no A levels to do work experience in an office enviroment (just to use a random example). Even then most people can't afford to do unpaid work experience, instead opting to do paid work.

    And most graduate 'do' have work experience, but having worked for potentially 5 years in entry level or low status jobs doesn't help. I remember getting rejected from one position because I didn't have two years experience of managing 15+ people.... and this was an entry level paid internship. Others because I didn't have 3 years experience working in an office or HR department (recruiters favourite two requirements)..... often excluding call centres.... ignoring the fact such jobs are already the lowest entry level jobs into office environments anyway :facepalm2:
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    (Original post by DanB1991)
    :lol: haha please..... what company is going to hire a 16 year old with no A levels to do work experience in an office enviroment (just to use a random example). Even then most people can't afford to do unpaid work experience, instead opting to do paid work.

    And most graduate 'do' have work experience, but having worked for potentially 5 years in entry level or low status jobs doesn't help. I remember getting rejected from one position because I didn't have two years experience of managing 15+ people.... and this was an entry level paid internship. Others because I didn't have 3 years experience working in an office or HR department (recruiters favourite two requirements)..... often excluding call centres.... ignoring the fact such jobs are already the lowest entry level jobs into office environments anyway :facepalm2:
    With that attitude, none. Those with the right attitude will ignore what you've said in the first bit and will be doing the work shadowing/placements - that is the difference.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    With that attitude, none. Those with the right attitude will ignore what you've said in the first bit and will be doing the work shadowing/placements - that is the difference.

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    I already did shadowing and placements at 16, while doing A levels.... while doing a 32 hour job.... at the time I most definitely had the right attitude....

    The problem? Flash foward to 24, I'm too qualified for half the jobs I apply for, I've already been directly asked 5 times now why the hell I'm applying for the job as I'm overqualified. Sadly saying *because no-one else will give me an interview* is pretty much a way not to get a job.

    Then the other half of jobs I apply for, despite work experience, because I haven't actually worked directly in those sectors, departments or environments as they see it, other older individuals are getting the jobs. This is despite them being entry level positions. So basically half the time I'm over qualified and the other half of the time my experience isn't specific enough.

    I had one interview that stays in my mind, despite the agency saying the company would prefer someone who hadn't worked in purchasing (so they could mold them as it was an incredibly niche sector) I really needed to stress how my work experience in the past could apply. I ended the interview their favourite candidate so far, being told even by the agency that the company had pretty much stated they wanted me, seeing they didn't want someone who had already worked in that area. However despite me stating all my experience and how it was pretty much the same I remember the interviewer saying how good my interview was despite having never 'worked in the real world before'.... I'd been working full time for 3 years and part time the previous 6, even the co-interviewer gave him a funny look..... I lost the job to someone with 10 years experience, despite them bombing the interview purely based on the fact he had previous experience.... this was for an entry level 15k purchasing position....

    A story repeated multiple times by my agency rep (who has been great tbh), friends and in other interviews. Internships specifically are incredibly niche and the vast, vast majority of student won't get on them, mostly due to the fact there are a ton more students than internships out there. I don't really even have a problem with this seeing it's more a supply and demand issue. What I do have a problem with is entry level jobs that realistically most student don't have a chance of getting straight out of uni because employers can be picky because of the amount of people out there who are stuck in part time work, all competing for the same full time jobs.

    *Addition* to the first part... I presume you've never been rejected from work experience.... for not having enough experience? :facepalm2:
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    They've heard too many horror stories from people who've been through uni without bothering to pick up any kind of useful experience in anything and then, upon finding themselves unable to walk into their ideal position, declared that they have been shafted by 'the system' and, often, 'the Tories'.

    edit: although to be fair I think the idea that you need to start accumulating experience at 16 is laughable. Through your degree is fine.
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    (Original post by DanB1991)
    :lol: haha please..... what company is going to hire a 16 year old with no A levels to do work experience in an office enviroment (just to use a random example). Even then most people can't afford to do unpaid work experience, instead opting to do paid work.

    And most graduate 'do' have work experience, but having worked for potentially 5 years in entry level or low status jobs doesn't help. I remember getting rejected from one position because I didn't have two years experience of managing 15+ people.... and this was an entry level paid internship. Others because I didn't have 3 years experience working in an office or HR department (recruiters favourite two requirements)..... often excluding call centres.... ignoring the fact such jobs are already the lowest entry level jobs into office environments anyway :facepalm2:
    This is everything that is wrong with the attitude of some students.

    Did you not have a work experience placement at the end of secondary school at the age of 16 years? That was to demonstrate to you that the possibility of gaining insight into the field of work is real. It was for you to expand upon that via paid or unpaid work in a sector that interests you, alongside studying.

    Also, the thing with entry level employment is that it is a stepping stone to the increased responsibilities of more senior level positions. You are not going to leave university with your degree and postgrad qualifications and waltz straight into a managerial post without working your way up from a suitable level of proven competence within the emploent field.

    It annoys me that seemingly intelligent individuals struggle with these basics of the world of work and continue to promote the bitter attitude of having been failed by some external process.
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    (Original post by DanB1991)
    I already did shadowing and placements at 16, while doing A levels.... while doing a 32 hour job.... at the time I most definitely had the right attitude....

    The problem? Flash foward to 24, I'm too qualified for half the jobs I apply for, I've already been directly asked 5 times now why the hell I'm applying for the job as I'm overqualified. Sadly saying *because no-one else will give me an interview* is pretty much a way not to get a job.

    Then the other half of jobs I apply for, despite work experience, because I haven't actually worked directly in those sectors, departments or environments as they see it, other older individuals are getting the jobs. This is despite them being entry level positions. So basically half the time I'm over qualified and the other half of the time my experience isn't specific enough.

    I had one interview that stays in my mind, despite the agency saying the company would prefer someone who hadn't worked in purchasing (so they could mold them as it was an incredibly niche sector) I really needed to stress how my work experience in the past could apply. I ended the interview their favourite candidate so far, being told even by the agency that the company had pretty much stated they wanted me, seeing they didn't want someone who had already worked in that area. However despite me stating all my experience and how it was pretty much the same I remember the interviewer saying how good my interview was despite having never 'worked in the real world before'.... I'd been working full time for 3 years and part time the previous 6, even the co-interviewer gave him a funny look..... I lost the job to someone with 10 years experience, despite them bombing the interview purely based on the fact he had previous experience.... this was for an entry level 15k purchasing position....

    A story repeated multiple times by my agency rep (who has been great tbh), friends and in other interviews. Internships specifically are incredibly niche and the vast, vast majority of student won't get on them, mostly due to the fact there are a ton more students than internships out there. I don't really even have a problem with this seeing it's more a supply and demand issue. What I do have a problem with is entry level jobs that realistically most student don't have a chance of getting straight out of uni because employers can be picky because of the amount of people out there who are stuck in part time work, all competing for the same full time jobs.

    *Addition* to the first part... I presume you've never been rejected from work experience.... for not having enough experience? :facepalm2:
    Most likely a different sector, but my experience with applying for paid internships has been completely different. The internship I have now, I've not had a similar role like it before- I've had quite a bit of work experience but in different roles. Before getting the internship I had a number of failed interviews and whilst the initial email would say 'we've taken on someone with more experience' once I arranged a feedback call I would get a detailed explanation of where I went wrong in the interview and it would be everything to do with how I performed in the interview.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    You should be applying for part time jobs/work experience as soon as you turn 16. Second year of uni is way to late to start applying for these roles.

    Internships, yes - but it's the previous experience that often gets you the internship. So if someone who hasn't bothered getting a part time job is rejected from an internship then that's on them.
    And what happens if suddenly everyone starts obtaining work experience from 16?

    There simply isn't enough grad jobs out there for the huge number of students who are going to university. And why are so many students going to university? Because currently it's seen as the only path one can take due to schools which are more focused on league tables than providing genuine advice to their students.

    I've secured my dream job but my brother is 16, a below average student who wants to study a creative degree. In my opinion he should focus on looking for work immediately after A-levels but convincing him of that when his school has been pushing the university or nothing rhetoric since he began GCSEs is impossible. And besides, who can really blame a 16 year old for not focusing 100% on their future?

    It is the structural and educational flaws which is leading to so much disenchantment amongst students.


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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    The vast majority of students feel they are entitled to walk straight into a high paying job upon graduation, and thus do not bother applying for internships or part time jobs.

    Because of this abhorrent attitude, they graduate with nothing on their CV but a degree grade, and are therefore rejected from these jobs due to lack of experience.

    They then, instead of coming up with a plan B and applying for minimum wage jobs or voluntary work, decide to sit on their backsides all day, whining about how hard done by they are and making no effort to improve their situation.

    To cut a long story short, those who find themselves unemployed after graduation only have themselves to blame. Students need to get their priorities straight and lose the entitled attitude.
    Do you do nothing but complain about young people all day?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    With that attitude, none. Those with the right attitude will ignore what you've said in the first bit and will be doing the work shadowing/placements - that is the difference.

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    "This person has no qualifications or experience but he has the right attitude, so lets hire him"
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    (Original post by Dom2375)
    "This person has no qualifications or experience but he has the right attitude, so lets hire him"
    You say this in jest, but that exact thing has happened to people I know, multiple times.

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    (Original post by Abstract_Prism)
    I agree, people are such downers.

    I am quite optimistic.
    Optimism is narcissistic, and unrealistic.
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    To be honest the outlook for our generation is poor. We're worse off than our parents, will struggle to buy a house, wages aren't rising, competition for good jobs is fierce, you don't get a degree you're shut out of many jobs and if you do it may be tens of thousands of debt for nothing as so many people have them.

    I agree work experience is a huge factor and many people are far too entitled, but it's also reasonable to be annoyed that some people (aka those with rich parents) get to do loads of internships and unpaid experience to get themselves up the ladder while others simply can't do those things as they have to get a real job and pay their way (even if that real job is badly paid).
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    The vast majority of students feel they are entitled to walk straight into a high paying job upon graduation, and thus do not bother applying for internships or part time jobs.

    Because of this abhorrent attitude, they graduate with nothing on their CV but a degree grade, and are therefore rejected from these jobs due to lack of experience.

    They then, instead of coming up with a plan B and applying for minimum wage jobs or voluntary work, decide to sit on their backsides all day, whining about how hard done by they are and making no effort to improve their situation.

    To cut a long story short, those who find themselves unemployed after graduation only have themselves to blame. Students need to get their priorities straight and lose the entitled attitude.
    I tried to improve myself once. Fed up of being on minimum wage I decided to learn to drive a couple of types of forklift truck. Loads of employers use them. Ended up driving a forklift for minimum wage. Just as well I didnt study astrophysics. I would be the most intelligent man in the jobcenter.
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    (Original post by CCC75)
    This is everything that is wrong with the attitude of some students.

    Did you not have a work experience placement at the end of secondary school at the age of 16 years? That was to demonstrate to you that the possibility of gaining insight into the field of work is real. It was for you to expand upon that via paid or unpaid work in a sector that interests you, alongside studying.

    Also, the thing with entry level employment is that it is a stepping stone to the increased responsibilities of more senior level positions. You are not going to leave university with your degree and postgrad qualifications and waltz straight into a managerial post without working your way up from a suitable level of proven competence within the emploent field.

    It annoys me that seemingly intelligent individuals struggle with these basics of the world of work and continue to promote the bitter attitude of having been failed by some external process.
    Didn't read my follow up post did you? Plus when I was at school you did your work experience placement aged 14.

    I've been applying almost exclusively for non management entry level jobs. The main problem is most those entry level jobs aren't even going to graduates, they're going for individuals who have lost their jobs due to the current economic climate and already have experience in those sectors.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    Most likely a different sector, but my experience with applying for paid internships has been completely different. The internship I have now, I've not had a similar role like it before- I've had quite a bit of work experience but in different roles. Before getting the internship I had a number of failed interviews and whilst the initial email would say 'we've taken on someone with more experience' once I arranged a feedback call I would get a detailed explanation of where I went wrong in the interview and it would be everything to do with how I performed in the interview.
    In all honesty I gave up on internships a year ago, may try dipping my toes in to see if I can try getting them again.

    Sadly my brand new issue in interviews is the whole "why haven't you been in work since leaving uni"..... despite pretty much being a bar manager for the last 12 months, most interviewers don't see it as a 'real job' :facepalm2:

    And people wonder why graduate are negative about jobs after uni?
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    (Original post by DanB1991)
    In all honesty I gave up on internships a year ago, may try dipping my toes in to see if I can try getting them again.

    Sadly my brand new issue in interviews is the whole "why haven't you been in work since leaving uni"..... despite pretty much being a bar manager for the last 12 months, most interviewers don't see it as a 'real job' :facepalm2:

    And people wonder why graduate are negative about jobs after uni?
    Oh wow that is tough, I would definitley prepare a good comeback on that stating actually I have been employed and I've been doing x x and x. I volunteered from June 2015 until a few weeks ago and not once in the 8 interviews did the fact I wasn't in a paid role come up (it clearly said volunteer on my cv). The only person who was funny about it was a lady from a recruitment agency, actual employers weren't bothered.
 
 
 
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