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Access to medicine (Clinical Science Foundation Year) worries and enquiries? Watch

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    (Original post by Alan1980)
    Was the course actually called an access course? I finished a proper, stand alone, 1-year access to medicine course in June and start my medicine degree at Southampton in a couple of weeks. There were a couple of issues with the course but overall it was excellent and did exactly what I needed it to do. This access/foundation hybrid sounding thing sounds like a horrible half way house.
    That's really good! If A level resits/another degree aren't possible I'd always advise doing one of the proper access courses which medical schools accept. Ours wasn't officially one- and in the end a lot of people who transferred had perfect science A levels and were privately educated educated (so had no need for an access course)- it really was awful and all very cloak and daggers. Well done on your offer for medicine
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    (Original post by TurtleCub)
    I was adamant that my only option into medicine was through a foundation year until now. Studying chemistry, maths (sometimes accepted as a science) and computer science; at first the idea of a foundation year didn't hinder me, but reading your post has truthfully scared me. I have 1(possibly two) science A levels, didn't do amazingly in my as exams, however all my tutors advised a foundation year. In a perfect world id like to apply after i receive my A-level results, but will still apply to foundation med the year before. Honestly, do you think i wont be able to transfer into the next year, from foundation.
    Hello,

    So you've done a fair bit of chemistry and maths? Any biology?

    I'd really advise against the Clinical Sciences course, even if you have a good science knowledge base. They accept so so many people these days that the odds of transferring are just never assured- and when you don't transfer you're stuck on the degree which is totally abysmal. You need to consider that possibility, aside from debating whether you might transfer or not. The degree was run really badly without proper support, and problems were never dealt with properly. Some dissertation supervisors didn't do their job properly and support students, which really badly affected them. Deadlines were planned ridiculously. I'd really suggest looking at any other possible options before going onto Clinical Sciences.
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    (Original post by Alan1980)
    Was the course actually called an access course? I finished a proper, stand alone, 1-year access to medicine course in June and start my medicine degree at Southampton in a couple of weeks. There were a couple of issues with the course but overall it was excellent and did exactly what I needed it to do. This access/foundation hybrid sounding thing sounds like a horrible half way house.
    they are calling it foundation in medicine. I just said access in the thread... what percentage did you need to do medicine on the course or was it guaranteed btw if you dont mind me asking what did you get for your A levels. I just need inspiration.

    They are calling I
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    (Original post by goingtogetthere)
    they are calling it foundation in medicine. I just said access in the thread... what percentage did you need to do medicine on the course or was it guaranteed btw if you dont mind me asking what did you get for your A levels. I just need inspiration.

    They are calling I
    Out of 15 modules I was made an offer from Southampton that I had to get 10 at distinction and 5 at merit. I got 1 E at A-level...but that was 18 years ago!
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    (Original post by youcanneverknow)
    Hello,

    So you've done a fair bit of chemistry and maths? Any biology?

    I'd really advise against the Clinical Sciences course, even if you have a good science knowledge base. They accept so so many people these days that the odds of transferring are just never assured- and when you don't transfer you're stuck on the degree which is totally abysmal. You need to consider that possibility, aside from debating whether you might transfer or not. The degree was run really badly without proper support, and problems were never dealt with properly. Some dissertation supervisors didn't do their job properly and support students, which really badly affected them. Deadlines were planned ridiculously. I'd really suggest looking at any other possible options before going onto Clinical Sciences.
    (Original post by youcanneverknow)
    Hello,

    So you've done a fair bit of chemistry and maths? Any biology?

    I'd really advise against the Clinical Sciences course, even if you have a good science knowledge base. They accept so so many people these days that the odds of transferring are just never assured- and when you don't transfer you're stuck on the degree which is totally abysmal. You need to consider that possibility, aside from debating whether you might transfer or not. The degree was run really badly without proper support, and problems were never dealt with properly. Some dissertation supervisors didn't do their job properly and support students, which really badly affected them. Deadlines were planned ridiculously. I'd really suggest looking at any other possible options before going onto Clinical Sciences.
    0 biology at all (except GCSE), thats my main reason for applying to a foundation degree. However, many people have advised me to apply with my actual grades to a non-foundation degree. I dont think i'd be able to survive in that type of environment, competing against your peers with shoddy teaching isn't my style. Thank you for the help, I will wait until the following year or adjustment. Thanks again XD
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    (Original post by Alan1980)
    Was the course actually called an access course? I finished a proper, stand alone, 1-year access to medicine course in June and start my medicine degree at Southampton in a couple of weeks. There were a couple of issues with the course but overall it was excellent and did exactly what I needed it to do. This access/foundation hybrid sounding thing sounds like a horrible half way house.
    Hi, what course was this? where did you do it, and what are the entry requirements? thanks in advance
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    (Original post by doctor.M)
    Hi, what course was this? where did you do it, and what are the entry requirements? thanks in advance
    It was called Access to Medicine and I did it at City and Islington College in London, though there are lots of colleges that offer it. Entry requirements are different for each college and change frequently so you'll have to check with them.
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    (Original post by Alan1980)
    It was called Access to Medicine and I did it at City and Islington College in London, though there are lots of colleges that offer it. Entry requirements are different for each college and change frequently so you'll have to check with them.
    Hi, is this course only for adults with no/less formal qualifications, as im 18, so will i not be considered. also, how tough is the competition?, and do you have much of a chance of getting into medicine with this course.

    Thanks
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    (Original post by doctor.M)
    Hi, is this course only for adults with no/less formal qualifications, as im 18, so will i not be considered. also, how tough is the competition?, and do you have much of a chance of getting into medicine with this course.

    Thanks
    That's its intended use yes, though you can do it younger. There were many 18 year olds on my course. However most unis see 18 year olds doing it as a negative, you should be doing/have done A levels. You will find it very difficult to get into uni with an access course without a bit of life experience first. They shouldn't be seen as a second chance at A level entry. A college will take you on to the course, a uni may not accept it.

    Two people got into medicine from my course last year. I'm 36 with 15 years experience as a firefighter and the other guy is mid twenties and has been both a paramedic and pharmacist.

    I have a blog about it all that you can find at www.newmedicblog.wordpress.com
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    (Original post by um12)
    I'm sorry to hear about the disappointing experiences of the full clinical sciences degree. I did only the foundation year (with no science A-levels!) and managed to transfer to medicine at Leeds. In fact there were a number of us with no science A-levels who managed it. Unfortunately I've heard many negative reports about the Clinical Sciences BSc. But I also know many graduates from this course who are now doing medicine as a post-grad.
    Hi,

    I'm looking to do the Bradford Foundation year in clinical sciences & transfer to medicine. I saw on a recent post that you'd been successful in the transfer and I had a few questions:

    (1) Do you have any advice on how to be successful in the transfer? I've done Chemistry & Human Biology a-level but I meet the widening participation criteria which is why I've applied
    (2) Is it true people aren't given a chance to transfer even if they score 90%? And if so, why?
    (3) How is the typical timetable?
    (4) will I have a chance to transfer again in year 1, or do they not do that anymore?
    (5) For people who werent successful do you have any reason why?
    (6) How did you make the transfer? Do you have any advice on being successful, interview tips and being selected? & would it be worth getting any work experience?
    (7) Does bradford uni choose who can be selected?
    (8) do you have to write a personal statement?
    (9) How is uni life at Bradford? Campus and city wise?

    Sorry to bombard you with questions!! But this could kinda be my future so yeah.. anyway thankyou!!
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    (Original post by L1ndy)
    Hi,

    I'm looking to do the Bradford Foundation year in clinical sciences & transfer to medicine. I saw on a recent post that you'd been successful in the transfer and I had a few questions:

    (1) Do you have any advice on how to be successful in the transfer? I've done Chemistry & Human Biology a-level but I meet the widening participation criteria which is why I've applied
    (2) Is it true people aren't given a chance to transfer even if they score 90%? And if so, why?
    (3) How is the typical timetable?
    (4) will I have a chance to transfer again in year 1, or do they not do that anymore?
    (5) For people who werent successful do you have any reason why?
    (6) How did you make the transfer? Do you have any advice on being successful, interview tips and being selected? & would it be worth getting any work experience?
    (7) Does bradford uni choose who can be selected?
    (8) do you have to write a personal statement?
    (9) How is uni life at Bradford? Campus and city wise?

    Sorry to bombard you with questions!! But this could kinda be my future so yeah.. anyway thankyou!!
    Hello! you've asked a lot of questions there! so to save me from typing pages and pages I'll answer them briefly. Feel free to PM me with anymore specific questions.

    1) great that you've decided to apply! the course is a great way into medicine and gives a good basic science grounding for medicine and other degrees. Learn what bradford uni teach you, be honest with yourself about how well you know topics, work hard.

    2) theoretically this is true. when I was in foundation year you had to score >70% on average over the course and >70% in chemistry to BE ABLE to apply for transfer. You then sent a personal statement to leeds, they picked which students to interview and then which students to accept onto the course. So a student with 90% average could have written a horrendous personal statement and not be invited to interview, or be invited to interview, not perform well and therefore not be offered a place at Leeds.

    3) timetable was around 4 mornings a week of lectures and workshops. this may have changed though. And there were ALOT of mock exams, essays and coursework to do. it was an extremely busy year.

    4) don't know but it should say on the website

    5) they didn't get the >70% in chemistry, or didn't perform well at interview

    6) focus on your academic performance. getting good marks is what makes you eligible for transfer, so focus on that. work experience is a must. worry about interview technique after you've done the foundation course and been invited to interview.

    7) no. Leeds university choose. but students HAVE to meet the eligibility requirements of >70% for their application to be sent to Leeds (it was 70% when I did the course, again, this may have changed)

    8) yes

    9) Bradford is a good uni with very passionate and enthusiastic teachers. Campus life is vibrant, there's always lots going on and plenty of social events. Bradford itself isn't brilliant but the centre is ok. Has plenty of students term time.
 
 
 
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