Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    I have a friend that got an A in GCSE Maths and went on to get A*A* in maths and further maths. There are lots of material to revise from and as long as you do all the textbook questions and past paper questions for a module, you'll be sorted. Just make sure you're constantly revising and doing questions. Even if you keep getting solid grades in papers don't get complacent. I've seen many neglect easier modules like C1 and then the exam hit them hard!


    As you're only doing 3, I would recommend doing physics so you have a much more solid combo and it opens up a lot of options (e.g. engineering) but economics is definitely fine if you're interested in that.


    I would recommend you start learning ahead in C1 and then C2 as you need to be comfortable with them to do FP1.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AdeptDz)
    Depends what uni, but just check the entry requirements.
    Oxford want A* and As
    Cambridge want A* and As but focus less on GCSE grades and more on UMS percentage
    UCL want a C in MFL
    And most good unis want like Bs and As at GCSE but most don't care given you have amazin a-levels
    Thanks this gives more confidence to do a maths degree. BTW what year are you in? cos i wanted to ask how well you did and coped with your A levels.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AAls)
    I have a friend that got an A in GCSE Maths and went on to get A*A* in maths and further maths. There are lots of material to revise from and as long as you do all the textbook questions and past paper questions for a module, you'll be sorted. Just make sure you're constantly revising and doing questions. Even if you keep getting solid grades in papers don't get complacent. I've seen many neglect easier modules like C1 and then the exam hit them hard!


    As you're only doing 3, I would recommend doing physics so you have a much more solid combo and it opens up a lot of options (e.g. engineering) but economics is definitely fine if you're interested in that.


    I would recommend you start learning ahead in C1 and then C2 as you need to be comfortable with them to do FP1.
    I will start learning C1 and C2 as soon as College starts. Thanks for the advice will definitely keep that in mind
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by homere)
    Thanks this gives more confidence to do a maths degree. BTW what year are you in? cos i wanted to ask how well you did and coped with your A levels.
    Going in to year 12 this September, but if you work hard you should be okay, i've got a post about a-level tips if you want ill post it here
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by homere)
    I will start learning C1 and C2 as soon as College starts. Thanks for the advice will definitely keep that in mind
    thats good, you will do great just make sure you keep on top of the work
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AdeptDz)
    Going in to year 12 this September, but if you work hard you should be okay, i've got a post about a-level tips if you want ill post it here
    yes that would be great thanks. lol we are in the same year
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    I don't know how much they will help you, and yeh hopefully we both do good.
    A-Levl tips
    -When you do past papers make sure you happy with what you are getting and look to see an improvement over time. If not revise more and learn from your mistakes.

    -Tick off the specification to make sure you've learnt everything and nothing should shock you.

    -Try and be able to answer every question on all the past papers.. Aim for 100 so you get higher than if you aimed for like 80 or 90.

    -Also once you go through past papers do questions from other papers (Solomon papers etc. Or other exam boards with the same topics) on every topic you learnt for a bit then go back to past papers when you've forgotten the answers.

    -Try and do all past papers at least twice.

    -Start revising from the beginning and go over what you learn in every lesson

    -Go over every topic atleast 3 times

    -Keep track of what you get on past papers and make sure you meet your target.

    -On your second attempt on the past papers make sure you see an improvement from the first attempt and so on.

    -Focus on your weaker subjects when you have got your important subjects to where you want.

    -Ask the teacher for extra homework and questions.

    -If there is something you don't know ask the teacher straight away, or write it down and ask at the end.

    -Treat your mocks like the real thing

    -Always do more than is required if you are aiming for the best (which you should be).

    -Don't get frustrated if you don't get something, watch YouTube videos on it, ask your teacher then attempt some questions.

    -Take your time and do not rush things, make sure you understand everything you are doing.

    -it's better to understand how to do something than just know how to do it

    Try and understand it and you will remember it easier.

    -Never give up

    -If you get bored take a break

    -Don't neglect subjects

    -Always think you will pass, think positively.

    -Nothing is impossible, you can get straight As, if x can why can't you? Just work as hard as you need to

    -What you put in, is what you get it.

    -Make sure you pick right subjects, if you know what you want to do check the entry requirements.

    -Find something to motivate you, dream career? Uni? Making parents proud?

    -Try and want to revise, it shouldn't be something you have to do.

    -Help others out if they need it, it reinforces your memory and maybe they'll help you in the future.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by homere)
    Just out of interest how did you revise for your further maths and Maths A levels and also how well did you do?
    I did the questions in the textbook first, and then i just practised with past papers. I found that reading over the work before going over it in class helped quite a bit.
    I know a few websites that might help if you want
    Oh and got As in both maths and FM (98% avg)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by solC)
    I did the questions in the textbook first, and then i just practised with past papers. I found that reading over the work before going over it in class helped quite a bit.
    I know a few websites that might help if you want
    Oh and got As in both maths and FM (98% avg)
    what text books did you use?
    Also yes could you list the websites thank you
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by homere)
    what text books did you use?
    Also yes could you list the websites thank you
    I mainly used the Edexcel ones as a guide and i found that they were sufficient for most modules. However, i also had a old textbook that someone gave to me called 'core maths for advanced level' by Bostock and Chandler. This book is very good but It is quite old so wont match the current spec perfectly content-wise. It contains most of the content from c1-4 and the exercises contain some much harder questions compared to what the Edexcel textbooks offer.
    For applied modules and further maths i pretty much used the edexcel books though.

    madasmaths.com contains more difficult papers as well as booklets for all topics (pure and applied)
    physicsandmathstutor.com has all the past papers for each module along with revision.
    examsolutions.net has videos which go over exam questions.

    (This is the book i mean btw https://www.amazon.co.uk/Core-Maths-...hs+for+a+level )
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by homere)
    What about in terms of difficulty is it manageable? A lot of people told me its hard and should only do it if you are confident.
    Yes it's manageable. I've found that it's just like normal Maths, except grade boundaries are higher for modules at A2 (e.g. FP2, M3, S2) so you'll have to practice a lot
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by solC)
    I mainly used the Edexcel ones as a guide and i found that they were sufficient for most modules. However, i also had a old textbook that someone gave to me called 'core maths for advanced level' by Bostock and Chandler. This book is very good but It is quite old so wont match the current spec perfectly content-wise. It contains most of the content from c1-4 and the exercises contain some much harder questions compared to what the Edexcel textbooks offer.
    For applied modules and further maths i pretty much used the edexcel books though.

    madasmaths.com contains more difficult papers as well as booklets for all topics (pure and applied)
    physicsandmathstutor.com has all the past papers for each module along with revision.
    examsolutions.net has videos which go over exam questions.

    (This is the book i mean btw https://www.amazon.co.uk/Core-Maths-...hs+for+a+level )
    thanks
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by homere)
    thanks
    No worries, feel free to ask any questions about AS maths/FM throughout the year and ill try to help.
    Good luck
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    If you want to do a maths degree you should 100% take further maths. Getting an A at GCSE is nothing to put you off (the difference between an A and A* is often luck in my experience as simply misreading a question or making a stupid error can easily cost it you.

    If you enjoy maths I would also wholeheartedly recommend taking further maths. I loved doing further maths (most of it at least, D is awful).

    Economics is a perfectly good A level. I would say, there isn't as much maths in it as you might expect (I took it at AS and there was essentially none). However, they still compliment each other (a lot of econ degrees want you to have maths). People say you should do physics instead but mechanics is not the only form of applied maths. Statistics, number theory, analysis and decision mathematics have absolutely nothing to do with it. The vast majority of mathematics doesn't. You can easily do a degree in mathematics, become a mathematician and never ever do any physics.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Marked Target)
    If you want to do a maths degree you should 100% take further maths. Getting an A at GCSE is nothing to put you off (the difference between an A and A* is often luck in my experience as simply misreading a question or making a stupid error can easily cost it you.

    If you enjoy maths I would also wholeheartedly recommend taking further maths. I loved doing further maths (most of it at least, D is awful).

    Economics is a perfectly good A level. I would say, there isn't as much maths in it as you might expect (I took it at AS and there was essentially none). However, they still compliment each other (a lot of econ degrees want you to have maths). People say you should do physics instead but mechanics is not the only form of applied maths. Statistics, number theory, analysis and decision mathematics have absolutely nothing to do with it. The vast majority of mathematics doesn't. You can easily do a degree in mathematics, become a mathematician and never ever do any physics.
    Have you done a Maths degree?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dynamic_Vicz)
    Have you done a Maths degree?
    No, so i suppose i shouldn't say you should 100% take FM if you want to do a maths degree. However, I can't see it in any way being detrimental. You get a head start in the course and you get a concessionary offer.

    Nor should I say you wont need to do any physics. However, I do know a maths lecturer so I'm not completely talking out of my ****. He does topology and works with computers. It doesn't involve any physics. Depending on where you do a degree as well you don't have to take any mechanics modules so i think what I said is reasonable.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Marked Target)
    No, so i suppose i shouldn't say you should 100% take FM if you want to do a maths degree. However, I can't see it in any way being detrimental. You get a head start in the course and you get a concessionary offer.

    Nor should I say you wont need to do any physics. However, I do know a maths lecturer so I'm not completely talking out of my ****. He does topology and works with computers. It doesn't involve any physics. Depending on where you do a degree as well you don't have to take any mechanics modules so i think what I said is reasonable.
    cool. Just out of interest, do you want to do a Maths Degree? Also what AS' have you completed (assuming you're going to year 13 this September )
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dynamic_Vicz)
    cool. Just out of interest, do you want to do a Maths Degree? Also what AS' have you completed (assuming you're going to year 13 this September )
    I'll be starting my maths degree at Bristol in 2 weeks time. I got A*A*AA in Maths/Further/Chemistry/History at A2. Oh, i got an A in EPQ as well but I wouldn't recommend doing an EPQ for maths.
    • Political Ambassador
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Political Ambassador
    (Original post by Marked Target)
    I'll be starting my maths degree at Bristol in 2 weeks time. I got A*A*AA in Maths/Further/Chemistry/History at A2. Oh, i got an A in EPQ as well but I wouldn't recommend doing an EPQ for maths.
    Well done, what did you do your epq of?
    And if you got them grades couldn't you have applied to like lse or something but Bristol is a great uni as well tbh jus wondering why you didn't aim higher, congratulations


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AdeptDz)
    Well done, what did you do your epq of?
    And if you got them grades couldn't you have applied to like lse or something but Bristol is a great uni as well tbh jus wondering why you didn't aim higher, congratulations
    My AS grades weren't as good. I got an offer from St Andrews (probably the 'best' uni i got one from) as well but upon visiting (something i recommend doing) I didn't like it. In contrast, Bristol (somewhere i applied on something of a whim) which i wasn't even going to visit at first i loved. Its a really nice city, imo.

    Besides which, you can go to any number of universities in the UK and you'll get a good degree. We are very lucky to be (probably) the best country when it comes to higher education even if it does cost 9,000 a year.

    I also hate London (don't mean to offend any cockneys or whatever but your city is ****). LSE, Imperial all of them are just, urgh, I don't like them. Every time I've been to London there is a horrible atmosphere of superiority and people treat me like I'm retarded.

    My EPQ was done in statistical analysis. It was contentious whether or not I'd be able to do it since it might have overlapped with S1 and S2 (though it didn't in any way and my EPQ coordinator was an idiot). I ended up doing it on the correlation between people's socio-economic background and crime (a very obvious correlation but it was just an excuse for me to play with the FBI's data in statistics programs.)
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you like to hibernate through the winter months?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.