Accounting and Finance vs Economics

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    (Original post by ajay1998)
    Investment banks do typically prefer degrees in Economics.
    hey, this is pretty interesting information, where did you source this from?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Where did you hear this interesting (incorrect) piece of info?


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    A man who was a manager at an investment who came to my college to give a talk about going into careers in Finance. He said the most desired degrees were Maths, Economics and Statistics (though he did say A&F was a good degree, just not good as the others). He said those degrees were more academically rigorous, and alot of the mathematical skills can be applied in Finance or something to that effect.

    Though of course he may have been lying, and conspiring against us young, naive students.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Depends on whether you want to study A&F or not. If you do, yes it would be better.

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    This is my issue because I've never had a taster of A&F and apparently Econ at Uni is a whole lot different than a-level (Obviously ), and so I won't know what I'd enjoy for 3 years down the line
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Examples?
    Actuarial

    (Original post by Ze Witcher)
    I thought IB was all about Target uni's? As its harder to get into Econ courses at these unis, and a little bit easier for A&F then wouldn't it be better to do A&F?
    I guess.
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    (Original post by ajay1998)
    A man who was a manager at an investment who came to my college to give a talk about going into careers in Finance. He said the most desired degrees were Maths, Economics and Statistics (though he did say A&F was a good degree, just not good as the others). He said those degrees were more academically rigorous, and alot of the mathematical skills can be applied in Finance or something to that effect.

    Though of course he may have been lying, and conspiring against us young, naive students.
    A manager at an investment?

    Yeah people tend to toot their own degrees when they're giving out talks, tis quite easy to do so.

    Truth is most of finance is maths you learnt in year 7-8, and the really complex stuff is where you have your Maths/Physics/CompSci PhDs, everyone else just has to be ok with numbers. And your degree can be in whatever.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Oh does being on the support team mean I have to be super nice all the time? Didn't think so, no.

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    You're so negative and sarcastic. You always bring the mood on a thread down. Try being nice. Find it within yourself.
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    Thanks for all the replies.

    Just wanted to add, I missed out on the A in maths by a couples marks due to my C2 exam, and I'm hesitant about resitting it this year in case that's seen as a negative by universities - however, if I don't retake it, I cant quite see myself getting an A overall, thoughts?
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    (Original post by BabyLadDarren)
    Actuarial * .
    What if I told you, I know a Music grad starting a graduate scheme at Towers Watson?*
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    (Original post by The Awakener)
    You're so negative and sarcastic. You always bring the mood on a thread down. Try being nice. Find it within yourself.
    Ok bro, keep campaigning for free tuition fees
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    (Original post by BabyLadDarren)
    Let's be honest, no one respects an A&F degree, it's on a par with Business Management.
    Actually my uncle has a an A&F degree. He's a Hedge-fund Portfolio Manager making £850k + bonuses annually.

    Just sayin'
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    hey, this is pretty interesting information, where did you source this from?
    If you look at my earlier post you'll see I learnt that from personal experience, but I can see obviously why you'd view my comment with a skeptic eye.

    Here's what I found from a quick google search, it was literally the first link, so obviously other sources may say something different.
    http://news.efinancialcareers.com/uk...t-banking-job/

    Interestingly enough people with degrees in A&F are more represent in banking, however those with more "quantitative degrees" such as Maths, Statistics and Economics are paid a higher salary in banking. So make of that what you will.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Ok bro, keep campaigning for free tuition fees
    I will! But please don't think I need your permission to do it. I couldn't care less.
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    A&F for usefulness in banking/finance

    Economics I think however allows for a wider scope of career paths
    I actually looked into the course you are doing, the I&FRM at Cass, but I dont know if the course is too narrow for me. What do you make of the course as a whole? I hear that the university is mainly praised for its postgraduate degrees as opposed to its undergraduate...
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    (Original post by The Awakener)
    Actually my uncle has a an A&F degree. He's a Hedge-fund Portfolio Manager making £850k + bonuses annually.

    Just sayin'
    Cool. How long has he been in the industry for?
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    What if I told you, I know a Music grad starting a graduate scheme at Towers Watson?*
    Honestly I'd be shocked, but there are always outliers.

    (Original post by The Awakener)
    Actually my uncle has a an A&F degree. He's a Hedge-fund Portfolio Manager making £850k + bonuses annually.

    Just sayin'
    and

    he still did an A&F degree, which isn't impressive.
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    (Original post by ajay1998)
    If you look at my earlier post you'll see I learnt that from personal experience, but I can see obviously why you'd view my comment with a skeptic eye.

    Here's what I found from a quick google search, it was literally the first link, so obviously other sources may say something different.
    http://news.efinancialcareers.com/uk...t-banking-job/

    Interestingly enough people with degrees in A&F are more represent in banking, however those with more "quantitative degrees" such as Maths, Statistics and Economics are paid a higher salary in banking. So make of that what you will.
    There's this thing called correlation-causation. How many history students do you know who want to go into IB? How many Econ, Finance and Business students do you know who want the same thing?*

    There's your answer.*
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    Econ is generally considered a more traditional/ rigorous course than A&F (or similar), but people don't really care that much.

    I highly recommend you do not base your course choice on this (tradition) alone. The difference between them in terms of landing a job when you leave is undoubtedly minimal, and it is not worth studying something you don't enjoy for 3+ years. If you prefer the syllabus of an A&F/ finance/ management course over theoretical econ, you should go with what you enjoy more.

    If you don't really mind, it again doesn't matter. Straight economics courses will give you optional modules in finance/ management/ accounting, and some A&F courses will allow you to pick up basic economics modules. You should have a scout round the university websites/ speak to current students to learn more about possible modules.

    The core concepts of Econ vs A&F will be different, so that decision needs to be based on where your interests lie more - but as I say there will be plenty of opportunity to pick up modules in either.

    The key to getting a decent role (job/ internship) will be going to a target/ semi-target and then doing a decent bit of networking when they come around. Have some interesting stuff on the CV and you'll be sweet. There is a lot more to the system than the exact degree you do - and people honestly don't care that much. I only talk about the tradition aspect as there is of course some level of disparity between how the two are perceived. But ultimately it doesn't matter. Pick the course you will be happy to study for 3 years, and pick somewhere you will be happy to live. Think journey not destination.
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    (Original post by The Awakener)
    I will! But please don't think I need your permission to do it. I couldn't care less.
    Never asked you to take my permission on board, but if you must. Go ahead

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    (Original post by Ze Witcher)
    Cool. How long has he been in the industry for?
    Since 98

    He went to Strathclyde Uni, the best for Banking and Accounting in the UK.
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    (Original post by PrinceUpsb)
    Econ is generally considered a more traditional/ rigorous course than A&F (or similar), but people don't really care that much.

    I highly recommend you do not base your course choice on this (tradition) alone. The difference between them in terms of landing a job when you leave is undoubtedly minimal, and it is not worth studying something you don't enjoy for 3+ years. If you prefer the syllabus of an A&F/ finance/ management course over theoretical econ, you should go with what you enjoy more.

    If you don't really mind, it again doesn't matter. Straight economics courses will give you optional modules in finance/ management/ accounting, and some A&F courses will allow you to pick up basic economics modules. You should have a scout round the university websites/ speak to current students to learn more about possible modules.

    The core concepts of Econ vs A&F will be different, so that decision needs to be based on where your interests lie more - but as I say there will be plenty of opportunity to pick up modules in either.

    The key to getting a decent role (job/ internship) will be going to a target/ semi-target and then doing a decent bit of networking when they come around. Have some interesting stuff on the CV and you'll be sweet. There is a lot more to the system than the exact degree you do - and people honestly don't care that much. I only talk about the tradition aspect as there is of course some level of disparity between how the two are perceived. But ultimately it doesn't matter. Pick the course you will be happy to study for 3 years, and pick somewhere you will be happy to live. Think journey not destination.
    Finally some sane input, thanks Upsb, hope things are going well for you dude.

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