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Going into Year 13 - Give me some unique tips for getting As and A*s? watch

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    (Original post by Platopus)
    The main tip which I always give everyone, is to start revising from the very first day of the year. I'm serious, just read over your class notes/make revision notes/do past papers every school night and at the weekend after your homework. You don't have to do much - just 1.5-2 hours per day every day and by the time you get to exams, you will know your stuff so well that you won't have to put in ridiculous 12 hour revision sessions every day like some people do.

    This is the method I followed both at AS and A2. At AS, it got me AAAA and at A2, it got me A*A*A*. Because I revised little and often, around exam period it looked as though I was doing barely any studying and all my friends cannot believe how I hit such good grades despite "doing no work". But, I did work. It's just that I worked consistently throughout the year. If you add up the time I put aside every now and then from September onwards to revise, it would outstrip the total amount of revision done by people who suddenly start revising 24/7 only a few weeks before exams and then complain that, despite working so hard, they still haven't got a full set of A*s.
    Yeah that's a really important point! Thank you! I'll look back to this throughout the year when I get lazy and start making excuses XD
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    (Original post by Blake Jones)
    Yeah that's a really important point! Thank you! I'll look back to this throughout the year when I get lazy and start making excuses XD
    Just look at it this way.

    Say, 200 hours of revision = 1A* (I just plucked that figure out of the air, by the way)

    You can either get that A* by consistently putting in half an hour of work a day for the next year, or by cramming for 6 and a half hours a day every day in the month before your exams.

    If you are less lazy up front, you can afford to be more lazy later.
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    (Original post by Blake Jones)
    Yeah that's a good point about the autopilot bit, at the moment I have X amount of tasks/revision points scheduled each day to make sure I cover everything by exam time but my tasks aren't at specific times as I never know how long things will take. Would you say the time aspect is an important thing to put into the timetable?
    I'd say initially be quite generous with the time you give yourself to complete tasks, and then as the next month or two moves on you should start to get to grips with how long things should take you, and then you can refine the next one. The beauty of it is that you can learn from your last time-table to improve the next one, so they should each become more effective than the last, and you'll quickly learn how much time you need to assign for things, especially if you make them for 2-3 week periods at a time.
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    Start a journal. At the end of each day note down everything productive you've done to do with your studies. I find this helps with motivation, and makes me want to do work in order to feel fulfilled and fill my journal. It doesn't work for everyone but I find it to really work! Also helps to make notes on things you didn't understand in class that you can come back to at a later date. You could also do a daily review, where you almost re write your notes in simple form to remind yourself of what you've done and to back up your learning. Good luck
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    (Original post by Platopus)
    Just look at it this way.

    Say, 200 hours of revision = 1A* (I just plucked that figure out of the air, by the way)

    You can either get that A* by consistently putting in half an hour of work a day for the next year, or by cramming for 6 and a half hours a day every day in the month before your exams.

    If you are less lazy up front, you can afford to be more lazy later.
    That's very true!
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    (Original post by JoeyTr)
    I'd say initially be quite generous with the time you give yourself to complete tasks, and then as the next month or two moves on you should start to get to grips with how long things should take you, and then you can refine the next one. The beauty of it is that you can learn from your last time-table to improve the next one, so they should each become more effective than the last, and you'll quickly learn how much time you need to assign for things, especially if you make them for 2-3 week periods at a time.
    That sounds a good idea, thanks for the tips
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    (Original post by lw8)
    Start a journal. At the end of each day note down everything productive you've done to do with your studies. I find this helps with motivation, and makes me want to do work in order to feel fulfilled and fill my journal. It doesn't work for everyone but I find it to really work! Also helps to make notes on things you didn't understand in class that you can come back to at a later date. You could also do a daily review, where you almost re write your notes in simple form to remind yourself of what you've done and to back up your learning. Good luck
    That's a good idea, perhaps I could include that in my Grow Your Grades thread
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    (Original post by Blake Jones)
    Hi guys! So basically I'm going into year 13 and I wanted to know whether you guys had any tips for succeeding at A-Levels/staying organised and preferably not the normal: "try not to get behind", "ask questions", "use your frees wisely" kind of tips. I'm basically looking for anything I might not have already considered! Thanks Blake
    I'm not sure if people have said this already but I'd say to read examiners reports especially with biology, they can be very useful in knowing where other candidates tend to slip up on certain questions and can help you avoid such mistakes. Also pace yourself with past papers etc. for example with maths during study leave I would do 1 C4 and 1 C3 paper a day (closer to each exam I'd focus more on one of them) and I managed to do most of the papers from 2006 up to the most recent ones.

    As long as you start early enough you won't drown in piles of revision you have to do over a couple of weeks. Make sure any notes you make are completed fairly early (I started mine in jan/feb and completed them by the end of the Easter holidays) as well to ensure you are actually able to read over it and ensure you understand all the content.
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    (Original post by ozzie2)
    I'm not sure if people have said this already but I'd say to read examiners reports especially with biology, they can be very useful in knowing where other candidates tend to slip up on certain questions and can help you avoid such mistakes. Also pace yourself with past papers etc. for example with maths during study leave I would do 1 C4 and 1 C3 paper a day (closer to each exam I'd focus more on one of them) and I managed to do most of the papers from 2006 up to the most recent ones.

    As long as you start early enough you won't drown in piles of revision you have to do over a couple of weeks. Make sure any notes you make are completed fairly early (I started mine in jan/feb and completed them by the end of the Easter holidays) as well to ensure you are actually able to read over it and ensure you understand all the content.
    Yeah that sounds a good plan, thanks for reminding me about examiners reports I'd forgotten about them!
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    The hard part of this year is the extra overload of exams considering that AS doesn't count. I'm planning on doing revision for AS content, working on the backbone of it during one day of the week (for me it's Sunday) so that by the time it gets to Jan-March, that extra pressure won't be added.
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    (Original post by Niyi Aderounmu)
    The hard part of this year is the extra overload of exams considering that AS doesn't count. I'm planning on doing revision for AS content, working on the backbone of it during one day of the week (for me it's Sunday) so that by the time it gets to Jan-March, that extra pressure won't be added.
    Yeah that's definitely a good idea, I think I'll do the same, thank you!
 
 
 
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