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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I could swear Codecademy didn't have half their content up behind a paywall when I registered a year ago :banghead:
    They didn't! They changed it all.

    code.org is fun for beginners, but not very advanced. For JS focused courses online, there's amazing documentation on MDN, learn-js.org has some good stuff, WebPlatform has more brilliant documentation, the book series 'You Don't Know JS' () is available for free (legally) and is amazing, there's also JavaScript Fundamentals, Khan Academy too… there's lots and lots of stuff.

    Are you looking into learning Node.js and AngularJS too? :holmes:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Are you all computer science students, or is anybody doing it completely independently?
    Checking in.
    I have a really poor work ethic when it comes to programming, so I tend to one thing for a couple of days and then slack off for weeks and months afterward, forgetting everything I've learned in the process. :lol:

    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I could swear Codecademy didn't have half their content up behind a paywall when I registered a year ago :banghead:
    They didn't, no. :sigh: I was surprised to see that on my last visit.
    Have you tried www.code.org? I saw somebody mention it on a list of websites where one can learn to code (alongside Codecademy). I've only had a glance, but it looks promising.

    (Original post by iEthan)
    code.org
    Ninja'd.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    X
    Yeah, I'm a CompSci student, only at Sixth Form though.
    I'm mainly interested in Cyber Security, so learning these languages early, is pretty good.

    Personally, Javascript is mainly relevant if you were going to learn how to Web Dev, pairing it with HTML/PHP + jQuery + SQL, you'd be a damn good dev.

    It all depends on what path you want to take with your code, do you wanna make fancy websites? Pentest? Applications? Mobile Apps? etc.

    I personally started with Python quite some time ago, I loved CodeAcademy before they introduced their 'CodeAcademy Pro' paid stuff.
    I started by going through those courses, getting myself one of the original Raspberry Pi's (this was probably 2010 - 2012) and figuring out how to use the CLI and basic bash stuff. Then moving onto creating practical python projects.

    Stick at it, and it'll pay off.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    Nope they didn't, everything they had was free, but I think it's enabled them to increase the content they do have (albeit having to pay for a lot of it...!).

    I'm teaching myself too - mainly Python, and a chunk of VBA purely because I was using it for a bunch of automation for work!
    Thanks for confirming that. What's your job, if I might ask?
    Yeh I do sympathise with sites needing to charge to maintain stuff. I guess I'm just a bit peeved with how they've done it. I mean it's fairly common for sites to charge something like a fiver a month for premium content. But Codecademy are charging $18!!! If you are a final year PhD student whose used up the last of their funding, then that is a big difference. Also most sites offer 1 month free trials. 1 month would have been enough for me to do some of the practice projects that were restricted, such as building a website :sad:

    (Original post by A Great Listener)
    Depends on what you want to do, what is interesting to you, and what level of knowledge you have.
    Javascript would be good if you wanted to get started with web development but even then, learning HTML and CSS first would be a better idea (again, I don't know your level of knowledge)
    For any easy starter language, with which you can do actual practical projects quickly and easily, I would go with Python. Easy to read syntax and quick to learn while very useful at the same time.
    I personally started with C/C++ - not the best first language but when I learnt it the rest looked much simpler.
    Personal question : how motivated are you to learn programming ?
    @A Great Listener well my goals are to learn the full stack, or at least try to. I'm exploring whether I could enter software engineering, and my immediate goal is to get a basis in my own time from which I could progress onto a programming bootcamp. I already know HTML and CSS. My personal priority is to select languages that will be the best for giving me a full understanding of programming and it's principles. I am the sort of person who needs to know the 'big picture'. I don't deal with it very well if somebody says 'do x to get y result'. I need to know why and how x leads to y, and so that means I'm seeking out a learning path that is gentle and not too confusing, but still complete and thorough. That is why I intend to skip jquery and bootstrap when I start javascript (and that's what the bootcamp I'm wanting to apply for asks anyway). Unfortunately most free learning tools get people to use jquery and bootstrap immediately rather than doing things the long way round. I would rather do things the slow and long way round and build a strong understanding, than take shortcuts and be confused about what I'm doing.
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    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Ninja'd.
    Woah……. long time no see!
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    For starters, most of the time if not all of the time, someone else has also encountered your issue whether it's the fact that your IDE doesn't let you compile you a file or you get linking errors. You can always if not most of the time find the answer on Stack Overlow. I can not stress this enough - numerous occasions where I have hit a wall and Stack Overflow has helped me, Use Google. Use books. Go to the library.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Thanks for confirming that. What's your job, if I might ask?
    Yeh I do sympathise with sites needing to charge to maintain stuff. I guess I'm just a bit peeved with how they've done it. I mean it's fairly common for sites to charge something like a fiver a month for premium content. But Codecademy are charging $18!!! If you are a final year PhD student whose used up the last of their funding, then that is a big difference. Also most sites offer 1 month free trials. 1 month would have been enough for me to do some of the practice projects that were restricted, such as building a website :sad:

    @A Great Listener well my goals are to learn the full stack, or at least try to. I'm exploring whether I could enter software engineering, and my immediate goal is to get a basis in my own time from which I could progress onto a programming bootcamp. I already know HTML and CSS. My personal priority is to select languages that will be the best for giving me a full understanding of programming and it's principles. I am the sort of person who needs to know the 'big picture'. I don't deal with it very well if somebody says 'do x to get y result'. I need to know why and how x leads to y, and so that means I'm seeking out a learning path that is gentle and not too confusing, but still complete and thorough. That is why I intend to skip jquery and bootstrap when I start javascript (and that's what the bootcamp I'm wanting to apply for asks anyway). Unfortunately most free learning tools get people to use jquery and bootstrap immediately rather than doing things the long way round. I would rather do things the slow and long way round and build a strong understanding, than take shortcuts and be confused about what I'm doing.
    I understand you. I hate when websites try to skip the fundamentals and get you to go onto jquery, bootstrap or foundation.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Thanks for confirming that. What's your job, if I might ask?
    Yeh I do sympathise with sites needing to charge to maintain stuff. I guess I'm just a bit peeved with how they've done it. I mean it's fairly common for sites to charge something like a fiver a month for premium content. But Codecademy are charging $18!!! If you are a final year PhD student whose used up the last of their funding, then that is a big difference. Also most sites offer 1 month free trials. 1 month would have been enough for me to do some of the practice projects that were restricted, such as building a website :sad:

    @A Great Listener well my goals are to learn the full stack, or at least try to. I'm exploring whether I could enter software engineering, and my immediate goal is to get a basis in my own time from which I could progress onto a programming bootcamp. I already know HTML and CSS. My personal priority is to select languages that will be the best for giving me a full understanding of programming and it's principles. I am the sort of person who needs to know the 'big picture'. I don't deal with it very well if somebody says 'do x to get y result'. I need to know why and how x leads to y, and so that means I'm seeking out a learning path that is gentle and not too confusing, but still complete and thorough. That is why I intend to skip jquery and bootstrap when I start javascript (and that's what the bootcamp I'm wanting to apply for asks anyway). Unfortunately most free learning tools get people to use jquery and bootstrap immediately rather than doing things the long way round. I would rather do things the slow and long way round and build a strong understanding, than take shortcuts and be confused about what I'm doing.
    I'm just working over the summer as a test analyst, so VBA is fairly good for when we need to do automation of a massive spreadsheet loaded full of stuff that needs....... testing!
    Definitely agree about the price... when I first saw it, I was expecting $5-10, so haven't bothered paying at all! Will just find and use stuff from the free web to use as practical projects... Problem I find is that I'm crap with coming up with ideas about what I should build to practice, so rely on an exercise/project from online to give me direction, and then usually I go off on tangents from there...!
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    (Original post by A Great Listener)
    For starters, most of the time if not all of the time, someone else has also encountered your issue whether it's the fact that your IDE doesn't let you compile you a file or you get linking errors. You can always if not most of the time find the answer on Stack Overlow. I can not stress this enough - numerous occasions where I have hit a wall and Stack Overflow has helped me, Use Google. Use books. Go to the library.

    ****ing love stack overflow!!! Use it all the time for server management and **** xD
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    (Original post by iEthan)
    They didn't! They changed it all.

    code.org is fun for beginners, but not very advanced. For JS focused courses online, there's amazing documentation on MDN, learn-js.org has some good stuff, WebPlatform has more brilliant documentation, the book series 'You Don't Know JS' () is available for free (legally) and is amazing, there's also JavaScript Fundamentals, Khan Academy too… there's lots and lots of stuff.

    Are you looking into learning Node.js and AngularJS too? :holmes:
    I don't yet know what those are, but probably :lol:
    Yeh I'm actually using FreeCodeCamp right now, which is similar to Codecademy but not quite as good. Or rather... I've done the module on CSS and HTML after having done the Codecademy one, and I find the FreeCodeCamp one a lot more patchy. Like it gives you a practical problem and then tells you how to use an element... but it doesn't schematically tell you about all the element types and all the syntax rules, like Codecademy did. And I need that complete picture, not just little tidbits. Anyway, FreeCodeCamp gives you projects to work on... and it's free. Whereas projects in Codecademy are 'Pro' I need to put the stuff I learn to practice in order to memorise it all. So for now I'm combining the two.

    (Original post by Hydeman)
    Checking in.
    I have a really poor work ethic when it comes to programming, so I tend to one thing for a couple of days and then slack off for weeks and months afterward, forgetting everything I've learned in the process. :lol:
    Try losing the will to live on a PhD, and then suddenly deciding that you need a different career, and that you better hurry because you can't afford your rent I find that quite motivating
    (Original post by Hydeman)
    They didn't, no. :sigh: I was surprised to see that on my last visit.
    Have you tried www.code.org? I saw somebody mention it on a list of websites where one can learn to code (alongside Codecademy). I've only had a glance, but it looks promising.
    Ninja'd.
    Not yet. I'll take a look!
    (Original post by CyberJake)
    Yeah, I'm a CompSci student, only at Sixth Form though.
    I'm mainly interested in Cyber Security, so learning these languages early, is pretty good.
    Cyber security does sound interesting :yep: I have never studied CompSci (aside from an ill fated GCSE many moons ago) but I might take one of the free Uni level CompSci courses on Coursera or Udemy if I have the time...
    (Original post by CyberJake)
    Personally, Javascript is mainly relevant if you were going to learn how to Web Dev, pairing it with HTML/PHP + jQuery + SQL, you'd be a damn good dev.
    It all depends on what path you want to take with your code, do you wanna make fancy websites? Pentest? Applications? Mobile Apps? etc.
    I personally started with Python quite some time ago, I loved CodeAcademy before they introduced their 'CodeAcademy Pro' paid stuff.
    I started by going through those courses, getting myself one of the original Raspberry Pi's (this was probably 2010 - 2012) and figuring out how to use the CLI and basic bash stuff. Then moving onto creating practical python projects.

    Stick at it, and it'll pay off.
    I still have to figure out what I am good and bad at, and that will determine which direction I head in. But at the moment I'm working on the assumption that I'll find front-end dev easier than back-end. As mobile app development doesn't interest me that much, I'll probably move towards more traditional web development. Thanks... I will stick at it. At least until the point where I conclude that I can't do it. But hopefully that point does not come

    I like your avvie, btw :yy:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    My personal priority is to select languages that will be the best for giving me a full understanding of programming and it's principles. I am the sort of person who needs to know the 'big picture'.
    Ah...
    So my "advice" here would be to get started with Python to become familiar with the core concepts and so that the confusing principles of a language like the memory management of C don't get into your way. When you have got the fundamentals under your belt, your best bet would be to see what kind of project you would like to do. What is your general interest? Have you done any projects? I could probably say that Java or C# would then be good so you get a good grasp of OOP (Object Orientated Programming).
    Also, search places like Github and find sample projects to replicate. Try to see the real world projects out there and what languages they have been written in.

    Not to forget, Javascript is by no means a bad language to start with but as your aim is to see the 'big picture' it would be better to not start with web development as the languages used in Web Development are rarely used else where. Hope that answered your concern.
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    ****ing love stack overflow!!! Use it all the time for server management and **** xD
    Stack Overflow FTW! I love it!
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    (Original post by A Great Listener)
    Stack Overflow FTW! I love it!
    It's literally just on my display 24/7 because whenever I have a problem, it's just google, and stackoverflow comes up Has saved my bacon a billion times

    Also, not sure if you'd know, but if I was eventually looking at the security/pentesting side of things, which would be the best route to go down in terms of languages...?
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    (Original post by A Great Listener)
    What do you mean by the full stack? A wide variety of languages or web development in full?
    BTW, I understand you. I hate when websites try to skip the fundamentals and get you to go onto jquery, bootstrap or foundation.
    Like so That's my goal right now.
    (Original post by A Great Listener)
    For starters, most of the time if not all of the time, someone else has also encountered your issue whether it's the fact that your IDE doesn't let you compile you a file or you get linking errors. You can always if not most of the time find the answer on Stack Overlow. I can not stress this enough - numerous occasions where I have hit a wall and Stack Overflow has helped me, Use Google. Use books. Go to the library.
    Yeh don't worry. I've been a mod/"helpful poster" on TSR for over 10 years now. The one thing I cannot stand are people who don't read the stickies, don't use search, and want other people to tell them basic info that is easily available online :dry: :reaper:
    So yeh, I will do all of that. And I definitely google issues before crying and running for help. But at the same time, community and bonding over issues and problems is also important for motivation and fun. Hence this thread

    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    I'm just working over the summer as a test analyst, so VBA is fairly good for when we need to do automation of a massive spreadsheet loaded full of stuff that needs....... testing!
    Definitely agree about the price... when I first saw it, I was expecting $5-10, so haven't bothered paying at all! Will just find and use stuff from the free web to use as practical projects... Problem I find is that I'm crap with coming up with ideas about what I should build to practice, so rely on an exercise/project from online to give me direction, and then usually I go off on tangents from there...!
    Oh cool... I used to hate spreadsheets but now I love them.
    I'm kind of lucky in that I have loads of ideas for easy (or maybe not so easy) projects to work on. I've read that this is a common issue for newbies. They learn the languages and then there's nothing for them to practice on that is between amateur level and the point where they're experienced enough to use it in the workplace.
    I have wasted a hideous amount of my time in some fan communities. And with one of them I ran a Facebook group where we had loads of contests and such things. So for that group alone I can think of like 5 basic web tools that I could have made which would have made everything a lot better and more efficient. Also I made a points system for myself to help me with personal goals. Turning that into a web tool would be nice.
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    (Original post by A Great Listener)
    Ah...
    So my "advice" here would be to get started with Python to become familiar with the core concepts and so that the confusing principles of a language like the memory management of C don't get into your way. When you have got the fundamentals under your belt, your best bet would be to see what kind of project you would like to do. What is your general interest? Have you done any projects? I could probably say that Java or C# would then be good so you get a good grasp of OOP (Object Orientated Programming).
    Also, search places like Github and find sample projects to replicate. Try to see the real world projects out there and what languages they have been written in.

    Not to forget, Javascript is by no means a bad language to start with but as your aim is to see the 'big picture' it would be better to not start with web development as the languages used in Web Development are rarely used else where. Hope that answered your concern.
    Thanks, yes it does
    I'll give that a go!
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    FORTRAN
    Plagioclase


    Time to achieve saitama gains
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Like so That's my goal right now.

    Yeh don't worry. I've been a mod/"helpful poster" on TSR for over 10 years now. The one thing I cannot stand are people who don't read the stickies, don't use search, and want other people to tell them basic info that is easily available online :dry: :reaper:
    So yeh, I will do all of that. And I definitely google issues before crying and running for help. But at the same time, community and bonding over issues and problems is also important for motivation and fun. Hence this thread

    Oh cool... I used to hate spreadsheets but now I love them.
    I'm kind of lucky in that I have loads of ideas for easy (or maybe not so easy) projects to work on. I've read that this is a common issue for newbies. They learn the languages and then there's nothing for them to practice on that is between amateur level and the point where they're experienced enough to use it in the workplace.
    I have wasted a hideous amount of my time in some fan communities. And with one of them I ran a Facebook group where we had loads of contests and such things. So for that group alone I can think of like 5 basic web tools that I could have made which would have made everything a lot better and more efficient. Also I made a points system for myself to help me with personal goals. Turning that into a web tool would be nice.
    I absolutely love spreadsheets since learning VBA

    Ahh yeh, that's my main thing really...
    Haha, fairs, I love the contest side of things because then it spurs me on, however, does mean my sleep is severely reduced from what it already is, because I just want to get going with it... Turn it into a webtool!!!!!!! DO IT!!!!
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    (Original post by TSR Mustafa)
    FORTRAN
    Plagioclase


    Time to achieve saitama gains
    That's the spirit! None of this newfangled "python" nonsense!
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    (Original post by mobbsy91)
    It's literally just on my display 24/7 because whenever I have a problem, it's just google, and stackoverflow comes up Has saved my bacon a billion times

    Also, not sure if you'd know, but if I was eventually looking at the security/pentesting side of things, which would be the best route to go down in terms of languages...?
    Oh - I did go with pentesting and ethical hacking for a while. For hacking, unfortunately or fortunately a wide variety of languages is needed. Again, depends on what you want to do. All hackers at least have a moderate understanding of scripting languages such as Python, Perl and .... as they are absolutely crucial to automating the programs that they use. For coding payloads, making viruses and hacking in general, all companies if not most look for experience in C as it really goes to the deeper levels of computer science and binds quite well with hardware like Ras Pi, Arduino and ...

    BTW, if you are interested, Null Byte is the best source for free hacking tutorials and another website which I will dig out of my bookmarks.
    So in overall, alot of experience in languages like C and oh I nearly forgot =- networking - a MUST. TCP/IP, Stacks, Packets and ...

    Resources
    Null Byte - hacking in general. LOTS OF INFO
    Cybrary - free video tutorials and partnership with Cisco and more =- pentesting, networks and more

    Check them out!

    (Phew)
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    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    That's the spirit! None of this newfangled "python" nonsense!
    Ok oniichan
 
 
 
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