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18 and 32 weeks pregnant. AMA.. Watch

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    Do you regret anything?
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    Is it like carrying around a weight? What does it feel like?
    Ever wore a heavy backpack the wrong way round? Feels very similar to that
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    How do you feel knowing that, without a degree to get a high-paying job, you may struggle to fully support your child?

    (I'm not trying to attack your choice, because it is your choice at the end of the day, but I just can't help but feel that the child is going to suffer because you had it so young. I mean, you're barely old enough to support yourself, and now a child? How are you going to buy them things? How are you going to bring in money for food and rent, and care for it at the same time? I just think your decision is a bit naive, that's all).

    On a slightly lighter note, what do you plan to name him/her?
    My family comes from a working class background. My mother was 21 when I was born, my father 19. On top of that my mother and father got divorced when I was about 7. My mother also suffers from clinical depression.

    Both my parents remarried, with my father giving remarkably little to me, although my relationship with him is fine. I was given everything I wanted throughout my childhood and was never disadvantaged because my parents worked hard to make it so. I'm going to Sheffield to study BSc Psychology in a week.

    This kind of thinking is backward and only exists because the media and common consensus tells you should think like this. The mother will be fine. Stop trying to scare her The child will grow up just fine as long as it has parents who care about them.
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    (Original post by sfaraj)
    How did ur parents react?
    My mum was upset at first but she was supportive when I told her my plans. My dad was fuming and told me to get out his sight so I stayed away for 3 weeks
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    How old is the father?
    He'll be 20 next month
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    (Original post by ChrisD0)
    Congrats! Now are you going to assume responsibility for your actions and raise the child well; sacrificing much of your time and energy during the next 18 years into doing so? Is the father ready to do the same?
    I will try my best & he'll be right by my side, so yes
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    (Original post by L'absurde)
    :facepalm:

    So what are you going to do after you give birth? Go to uni...work...?
    I plan to go to university eventually yeah, and my boyfriend works full time
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    (Original post by Elastichedgehog)
    Stupid comment. Not everyone has the same plans for their life as you do. Even if this was an accident it's not necessarily a bad thing. I'm sure the baby will have a loving family and grow up just fine, especially since she's expressed she has a good support system.
    I didn't know she had a good support system, she told me so after I asked the question. Teen pregnancy isn't best thing (understatement of the year)...Having a child is a big commitment in general, and teens aren't the best equipped for those challenges.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    "Of the estimated 50,000 mothers aged under 20 living in England in 2005, over 80 per cent were aged 18 or 19; over 60 per cent were lone parents; 70 per cent were not in education, employment or training; and they were much more likely to live in deprived neighbourhoods. By the age of 30, teenage mothers are 22 per cent more likely to be living in poverty than mothers giving birth aged 24 or over and are much less likely to be employed or living with a partner. Teenage mothers are 20 per cent more likely to have no qualification at the age of 30 than a mother giving birth aged 24 or over. According to theDepartment for Work and Pensions around 70 per cent of mothers aged 16 to 19 claim income support."

    "Teenage mothers are also three times more likely to smoke throughout their pregnancy and 50 per cent less likely to breastfeed than older mothers, both of which have negative health consequence for the child. For these and other reasons birth weights of babies of teenage mothers are more likely to be lower and the rate of infant mortality for a baby born to a teenage mother is 60 per cent higher than for babies of older women."

    http://www.lemosandcrane.co.uk/home/...q_dl865rte.pdf
    Sorry I didn't word it more nicely.
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    what are you naming the child? Congrats btw.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I will try my best & he'll be right by my side, so yes
    That's very commendable, many would have taken the easy way out. I wish you the way of luck. And please don't smoke or drink during the pregnancy (in general as well!).
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
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    Congrats for keeping the baby

    Not really a question I know but still
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    (Original post by L'absurde)
    I didn't know she had a good support system, she told me so after I asked the question. Teen pregnancy isn't best thing (understatement of the year)...Having a child is a big commitment in general, and teens aren't the best equipped for those challenges.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    "Of the estimated 50,000 mothers aged under 20 living in England in 2005, over 80 per cent were aged 18 or 19; over 60 per cent were lone parents; 70 per cent were not in education, employment or training; and they were much more likely to live in deprived neighbourhoods. By the age of 30, teenage mothers are 22 per cent more likely to be living in poverty than mothers giving birth aged 24 or over and are much less likely to be employed or living with a partner. Teenage mothers are 20 per cent more likely to have no qualification at the age of 30 than a mother giving birth aged 24 or over. According to theDepartment for Work and Pensions around 70 per cent of mothers aged 16 to 19 claim income support."

    "Teenage mothers are also three times more likely to smoke throughout their pregnancy and 50 per cent less likely to breastfeed than older mothers, both of which have negative health consequence for the child. For these and other reasons birth weights of babies of teenage mothers are more likely to be lower and the rate of infant mortality for a baby born to a teenage mother is 60 per cent higher than for babies of older women."

    http://www.lemosandcrane.co.uk/home/...q_dl865rte.pdf
    Sorry I didn't word it more nicely.
    I understand I'm just quite opinionated about this I suppose.

    I certainly agree that it's not an ideal situation to be in, I'm 18 and the last thing I want is to be responsible for a child, although that's because I have bigger plans for myself and my future, and I'm certainly not ready to even consider thinking about a child.

    I just think people in this situation should be supported, not scorned
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    How do you feel knowing that, without a degree to get a high-paying job, you may struggle to fully support your child?

    (I'm not trying to attack your choice, because it is your choice at the end of the day, but I just can't help but feel that the child is going to suffer because you had it so young. I mean, you're barely old enough to support yourself, and now a child? How are you going to buy them things? How are you going to bring in money for food and rent, and care for it at the same time? I just think your decision is a bit naive, that's all).

    On a slightly lighter note, what do you plan to name him/her?
    My mum and Dad have said that as long as I continue with education, they'll help to support me until I'm able to do it by myself, which I'm very appreciative of. My boyfriend opened a savings account when we found out about the baby and half of his pay has been going in there each month.
    I know that it's not much and I may struggle, but I'm more than willing. I initially had a termination booked, but I couldn't go through with it
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
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    If this is genuine, don't do this to yourself. There's going to be ***** on here....
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    Do you regret anything?
    I don't regret falling pregnant, but I do regret the timing.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    so we thought that him pulling out was working.

    You got pregnant from precum?
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    (Original post by Elastichedgehog)
    I understand I'm just quite opinionated about this I suppose.

    I certainly agree that it's not an ideal situation to be in, I'm 18 and the last thing I want is to be responsible for a child, although that's because I have bigger plans for myself and my future, and I'm certainly not ready to even consider thinking about a child.

    I just think people in this situation should be supported, not scorned
    Agreed.

    What's done is done.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I don't regret falling pregnant, but I do regret the timing.
    That's fair. I hope everything works out for you and the baby x
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    (Original post by JRKinder)
    How do you feel knowing that, without a degree to get a high-paying job, you may struggle to fully support your child?

    (I'm not trying to attack your choice, because it is your choice at the end of the day, but I just can't help but feel that the child is going to suffer because you had it so young. I mean, you're barely old enough to support yourself, and now a child? How are you going to buy them things? How are you going to bring in money for food and rent, and care for it at the same time? I just think your decision is a bit naive, that's all).

    On a slightly lighter note, what do you plan to name him/her?
    Sorry, didn't see the last part. I dont know the sex because we wanted to keep it a surprise but for a boy we've picked Jonah and for a girl, Isabella
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    Are you proud of yourself?
 
 
 
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