Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mathcon)
    I'd say take a gap year, because then you'll have the grades and ample time to perfect your personal statement along with wider reading. No harm in applying now, but the AS grades might bring the chances down.
    when exactly do i take a gap year?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nuggetsarelife)
    do you think top unis will be able to look past my AS grades if i prove myself to my fmaths teacher and try get an A* prediction out of him. A*A*A total?
    Unfortunately, LSE won't believe the A* prediction in further maths if you got a B in your AS since A2 is a lot harder. I got an A in further maths a level and I'm predicted an A. You need a high A (90+ UMS average) to get predicted an A* in further maths at most schools.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nuggetsarelife)
    when exactly do i take a gap year?
    After giving your A2 this year and then applying for September 2018
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nuggetsarelife)
    what if i had extenuating circumstances such as anxiety and depression during my AS year seeing as its now all cleared up. what if i had an amazing PS, would it make up for my grades. im going for A*A*A min this year hopefully they'll let me through.

    im not here to be that guy who has 19 A* at GCSE and 4 A's saying do i have a chance? im genuinely concerned
    If you had good extenuating circumstances and an amazing personal statement you could have a good chance. I would think about taking a gap year though or not getting your hopes up too much.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Trinculo)
    That doesn't mean everyone doesn't have them. If what you say is true, everyone that applies to Cambridge is mad to not play them up.
    The admissions tutors can assess how severe the extenuating circumstances are. It doesn't just say ' extenuating circumstances'.

    In my case it was health problems and surgeries, but mental health issues are also recognised. Everyone feels anxious and sad, but if someone's sibling has died or their in mourning then I don't think that's something which can be 'played up'. Same if people are in extremely stressful home environments. In order to be fair they have to consider context, they're trying to dispel the ruthless and cruel stereotype.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by OriginalLifelin)
    The admissions tutors can assess how severe the extenuating circumstances are. It doesn't just say ' extenuating circumstances'.

    In my case it was health problems and surgeries, but mental health issues are also recognised. Everyone feels anxious and sad, but if someone's sibling has died or their in mourning then I don't think that's something which can be 'played up'. Same if people are in extremely stressful home environments. In order to be fair they have to consider context, they're trying to dispel the ruthless and cruel stereotype.
    do i mention this in my PS or is there a section on UCAS?
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by OriginalLifelin)
    The admissions tutors can assess how severe the extenuating circumstances are. It doesn't just say ' extenuating circumstances'.

    In my case it was health problems and surgeries, but mental health issues are also recognised. Everyone feels anxious and sad, but if someone's sibling has died or their in mourning then I don't think that's something which can be 'played up'. Same if people are in extremely stressful home environments. In order to be fair they have to consider context, they're trying to dispel the ruthless and cruel stereotype.
    I'm not saying some people don't have a rubbish life. I'm just saying that the number of people who can claim to have a rubbish life is a very large number. Universities don't even interview most candidates. How can they possibly assess someone's homelife, mental health and fortitude against anyone elses?

    Hence, extenuating circumstances aren't really extenuating. They're a shot at a lower entry offer, for anyone that can put up an argument that admissions people accept at the time.
    Online

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mathcon)
    I'd say take a gap year, because then you'll have the grades and ample time to perfect your personal statement along with wider reading. No harm in applying now, but the AS grades might bring the chances down.
    I'm assuming that the course your applying to is rather competitive and so with your AS grades, it could be a risk to aim for an A*AA. However, in saying that I've spoken to the admission staff at LSE, and I've asked
    'Do you look at academic profiles in the context of the school for which they had performed? i.e GCSE and AS at low performing school'. Now as you have said, you have received the best grades for Economics at your school, which perhaps could be mentioned in your reference. And as for their response, they do look at your academic profile in the context of your school.

    Now, I wanted a more conclusive answer about their admissions process, about whether I was a suitable candidate for their course. For instance I'm considering applying to LSE Accounting and Finance, and so their requirement is AAA but there will be loads of candidates with far higher grades. I asked them
    'Hi, can I have an honest direct answer about the admissions process? I just want to know whether or not I should apply because I've heard many stories from The Student Room and other sources about the caliber of students applying'. And they have said
    'I’m afraid it is not possible to advise whether you are likely to be made an offer before you have submitted your complete application. We consider a number of factors, including your academic profile, references and quality of your personal statement to assess your suitability. It is not therefore possible to suggest whether you will be competitively considered based on your AS and predicted A level grades alone.
    All applications are considered holistically and in context of the information supplied in your teacher’s reference. Though many candidates do exceed the minimum AAA requirement, AAA alongside a very well written personal statement and overall profile is sufficient for consideration to this programme.

    LSE is a very competitive university therefore a number of well qualified candidates are inevitability disappointed, simply because the demand for places fair outweighs the number of available spaces. In 2015/16 we receive 1,851 applications for 120 available spaces'. - this is just the scenario for my course, but it doubt its incredibly different for yours.

    Basically, if you think you can achieve the A*AA, you believe you are performing the best in your school, you have a great personal statement, there is a chance, but it all depends on what you think you can achieve.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Nuggetsarelife)
    do i mention this in my PS or is there a section on UCAS?
    It normally goes in the reference.

    I would strongly reccomend a gap year though. It means that you'll apply after getting your A2 grades for entry in 2018. So you'll have all the time you need to prepare your application, better grades, all offers would be unconditional. And a year where you can do whatever you want to do! Lots of people do gap years
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zainyyyyy)
    50/50 only two possibilities getting in or not
    Found the English Literature student
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    english language*
    (Original post by midgemeister7)
    Found the English Literature student
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Trinculo)
    I'm not saying some people don't have a rubbish life. I'm just saying that the number of people who can claim to have a rubbish life is a very large number. Universities don't even interview most candidates. How can they possibly assess someone's homelife, mental health and fortitude against anyone elses?

    Hence, extenuating circumstances aren't really extenuating. They're a shot at a lower entry offer, for anyone that can put up an argument that admissions people accept at the time.
    That's why people fill in the form or out in their reference.... People also give things like medical evidence, psychologist reports.... People who need these things definitely have circumstances which qualify as extenuating. I'm sorry but if candidate A was in a car crash and was healing all year and candidate B's cat died it's pretty easy to tell who's had a harder time. And it's not only for a lower offer ( or what many good unis are calling 'contextual offers', it also sheds more light on things like grades achieved etc.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by zainyyyyy)
    english language*
    Lool well there we go then, pretty much called it
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    also does maths, economics
    (Original post by midgemeister7)
    Lool well there we go then, pretty much called it
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    better off getting the grades first and reapplying during a gap year cause LSE are very unlikely to give you an offer based on your AS performance
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I'd say go for it. It's only two choices out of five. Whats the worst that could happen? They reject you, that's it. Then you pick a different firm choice or take a gap year after smashing your A-levels.
    Get the fact you had the best mark in Econ mentioned in your school reference - no offence but if a B was the best grade in a certain subject I'm assuming your school isn't very good on the whole, which could (and probably will) actually work in your favour depending on what contextual factors these unis take into account.

    Although, without trying to be rude, don't expect anything. Pick other safe choices with high % offer rates (Surrey, etc) but if you're not content with them, as I said use the rejection as motivation to smash your A-levels, do a gap year, and re-apply. Good luck!
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Applying to uni

All the essentials

The adventure begins mug

Student life: what to expect

What it's really like going to uni

Graduates celebrate

How to write a good personal statement

Expert PS advice from the people who will read it

Uni match

Uni match

Can't decide where to apply? Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Two students working together

A-Z of universities

Read our guides to unis and colleges from around the UK

A student working on a computer

Personal statement help

Use our tool to get your ideal PS quickly!

Hands typing

Degrees without fees

Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

A student looking down a microscope

Planning open days

Find upcoming open days and get advice on preparing.

Help out other students

These questions still need an answer

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.