Niqab wearer asked to leave restaurant in Germany

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    (Original post by MiszShortee786)
    If they want to prejudices then they shouldn't of opened the restaurant in the first place
    Can I have a gay Hindu marriage in a Mosque?
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    (Original post by MiszShortee786)
    Its up to the individual.... they want to practice their faith leave them... Nuns have the same dress code as us fellow Muslims dont see them getting discriminated? Personally I love wearing the Niqaab as it strengthens my faith! its all about pleasing Allah at the end of the day.
    If I walked into a restaurant with a balaclava on, or anything else that covers my face, I could expect to be turned away, and I think most people would agree that that is perfectly reasonable. Why should it be any different for the niqab? Sure, you consider it to be precious, but that's just your opinion. Not everyone else has to think it is. Allowing someone in with a niqab on is a privilege. Telling them to take it off is just treating them the same as everyone else.
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    (Original post by alexschmalex)
    It's a burger joint, it's not like they really have any rich snobs eating in there expecting to have their shoes shined. Kicking her out for being abusive like it says in the article is one thing, but for what she's wearing alone is ridiculous. People who get offended by a piece of cloth on someone else's head need to re-evaluate their lives, it's honestly a meaningless thing.
    Walk into a burger joint wearing a balaclava that covers everything but your eyes and see if they serve you.
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    (Original post by MiszShortee786)
    Im not saying to the nth degree... what I am saying is this isn't even news its just to hit back at us Muslims. WOW some lady wore a niqaab to a restaurant... the customers did not complain did they? There Is better things to focus on then this.
    So, if people had complained that there was a woman in a niqab, that would actually make his decision better?

    Your last sentence has nothing to do with the discussion.
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    (Original post by Viva Emptiness)
    So, if people had complained that there was a woman in a niqab, that would actually make his decision better?

    Your last sentence has nothing to do with the discussion.
    Nope the point made here is the STAFF that complained.... NOT the public and why go running to the media honestly.Thats not going to stop the lady entering another resturant or stop wearing the niqaab. So in essence these people totally failed! LOL
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    If you can't wear a bicycle helmet or balaclava in public, I don't see why you should be able to wear a niqab either.
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    (Original post by MiszShortee786)
    Nope the point made here is the STAFF that complained.... NOT the public and why go running to the media honestly.Thats not going to stop the lady entering another resturant or stop wearing the niqaab. So in essence these people totally failed! LOL
    Why is that the point made? What progress have we made here regarding the validity of the restaurant's decision now that we have established it was the staff and not the patrons?

    It's almost as if the purpose wasn't to prevent her from eating at restaurants, but to prevent her from eating at HIS restaurant, whilst wearing a niqab.
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    (Original post by KingBradly)
    Walk into a burger joint wearing a balaclava that covers everything but your eyes and see if they serve you.
    Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a massive difference between a balaclava which is pretty much only used for criminal activity and religious headgear. Sure I don't agree with covering a woman from head to toe so that us men aren't the ones tempted but at the same time it doesn't mean I'm going to assume she's secretly trying to blow me up. Really don't get how we in the west can demand others to conform and bend to our culture when we literally show zero respect for theirs and expect them to change it like an old pair of batteries
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    (Original post by alexschmalex)
    Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a massive difference between a balaclava which is pretty much only used for criminal activity and religious headgear. Sure I don't agree with covering a woman from head to toe so that us men aren't the ones tempted but at the same time it doesn't mean I'm going to assume she's secretly trying to blow me up. Really don't get how we in the west can demand others to conform and bend to our culture when we literally show zero respect for theirs and expect them to change it like an old pair of batteries
    Balaclavas aren't necessarily worn for criminal activity. Nor are motorbike helmets, but I reckon if you went into most restaurants and refused to take it off, they wouldn't let you stay. I don't see the difference between those things and religious headgear because I'm not religious, so it means absolutely nothing to me. If it means something to them, cool, have at it. Sure you should be able to wear it in the street wherever you please. But if someone wants you to take it off in their establishment then I think you should either do so or leave. Just cos it means something to the people who wear it, not everyone else has to pretend to feel the same way.
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    What an *******.
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    It's up to the individual just let everyone wear what they like her wearing a niqab shouldn't offend you and if it does then you need help if this was starting to become acceptable Nuns would remove their head coverings sikhs remove turbans jews their kippa it would just be impractical to impose restrictions on peoples religious freedom
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    good.
    in civilized countries, one does not cover their face in public unless they have something to hide.
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    Personally I think all private businesses and owners of private buildings in general should be allowed to have complete control over entry to their building, and power to expel from the premises anyone whom they choose for any reason. The exception to this is if they are running an essential service. For example if you run the only cafe in a small town in the Scottish highlands, it's discriminatory to make people travel to another town many miles away if they want to eat out. But otherwise, discrimination goes both ways: if business owners discriminate against certain groups, then those groups can discriminate back by giving their money to other businesses instead. That's the way it should be: businesses should survive or fail based on their ability to attract customers, they shouldn't be forced into serving customers for no good reason.
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    (Original post by alexschmalex)
    It's a burger joint, it's not like they really have any rich snobs eating in there expecting to have their shoes shined. Kicking her out for being abusive like it says in the article is one thing, but for what she's wearing alone is ridiculous. People who get offended by a piece of cloth on someone else's head need to re-evaluate their lives, it's honestly a meaningless thing.
    He was doing it because he thought it was upsetting other customers.

    If it is meaningless then why wear it to begin with? It is supposed to send a signal, hence wearing it in the first place.
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    (Original post by MiszShortee786)
    If they want to prejudices then they shouldn't of opened the restaurant in the first place
    We don't live in a third world desert, people opening restaurants in the civilised world might not consider that some people might want to dress like letterboxes.
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    (Original post by alexschmalex)
    Maybe it's just me, but I think there's a massive difference between a balaclava which is pretty much only used for criminal activity and religious headgear. Sure I don't agree with covering a woman from head to toe so that us men aren't the ones tempted but at the same time it doesn't mean I'm going to assume she's secretly trying to blow me up. Really don't get how we in the west can demand others to conform and bend to our culture when we literally show zero respect for theirs and expect them to change it like an old pair of batteries
    Why do you think religious dress is so important? Why is anybody else's hobby, eg cycling or motorbiking, less important than yours?
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    Have you ever seen anyone eat a burger in a Niqab? Have you ever seen anyone eating anything in a Niqab?

    It is impossible. The material get in the way, you have to lift it up to get anything in your mouth.

    Whenever I have been in a restaurant with someone wearing such clothing it has been discreetly removed to actually eat.

    So the whole faux argument is utterly absurd in practical terms.
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    I don't realise the big issue behind dresses garments and that sort of thing when it comes to racial and or religious prejudice. Religion is optional and as such it's optional for people to deal and/or tolerate it; If someone person is going around sharing their religious beliefs or showing them off. As such I think it's fair to ask someone portraying religion through a fashion, etc, to just leave. It's not polite, but it's fine.
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    It's the business' decision really. If they choose to eject the woman from the resuarant that's their right but they should be prepared for any consequences, such as people protesting or boycotting the restaurant.
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    So intolerant. Let her wear what she wants and practice her religion however she chooses. That's what makes us a great, liberal civilisation.
 
 
 
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