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    (Original post by BaconandSauce)
    That's what I though when I bounced across her bonnet 'hell it's only a minor infraction so what if she wasn't looking up when she pulled in front of me and after all I am wearing leathers and a helmet'
    Very minor lapses in judgement can lead to significant harm. Thankfully we generally prioritise intent over consequence. None of this supports the argument of completely disproportionate punishment for minor offences.

    Seems her reading a text from a friend about shopping was worth risking my life for.
    Any car journey is inherently risky. Even the greatest diligence in the world, you're increasing the risk of someone dying whenever you get in your car. By ignoring the degree or culpability in risk, your position becomes ludicrous - you might as well say someone who runs you over is prioritising getting flowers from a shop, or changing a radio station over your life. That's not how it works.
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Very minor lapses in judgement can lead to significant harm. Thankfully we generally prioritise intent over consequence. None of this supports the argument of completely disproportionate punishment for minor offences.



    Any car journey is inherently risky. Even the greatest diligence in the world, you're increasing the risk of someone dying whenever you get in your car. By ignoring the degree or culpability in risk, your position becomes ludicrous - you might as well say someone who runs you over is prioritising getting flowers from a shop, or changing a radio station over your life. That's not how it works.
    The intent was there.

    She intended to ignore the law and put other peoples lives at risk so she could discuss a shopping trip.

    You think a car journey is risky try it on a cycle or motor cycle.

    Yes that is how it works if you ignore the law you choose to break the law and you are aware of the consequences
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    (Original post by L i b)
    Very minor lapses in judgement can lead to significant harm. Thankfully we generally prioritise intent over consequence. None of this supports the argument of completely disproportionate punishment for minor offences.
    Using a mobile phone while driving is against the law, is inherently a distracting activity, and is focused on during driving lessons as well as by awareness campaigns. It is not a "very minor lapse of judgement" to use a mobile phone while driving and cause an accident, it is utter stupidity.
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    I would like to add that the other day I was talking with my friend on WhatsApp and I didn't realize he was driving until it was too late. He told me in mid conversation "I'm driving", upon which I politely said "Ok, see you later" because I knew it was risky. One second after he took his eyes off WhatsApp and put them back on the road, guess what.. he had a frontal crash with another car at 50 km/h. His car is fine because it is a 5-star fancy one, but the person's car in front of him was totaled (cheap car). There is no problem because they are both ok and the insurance took care of it.

    I am very upset with my friend for driving at such speeds whilst fully focusing on his mobile phone instead of on the road. He's not the only friend who drives irresponsibly. I have friends in their 20s who are unnervingly stupid, irresponsible and quite frankly asocial on the road (even though they are extroverts). Here's what they did:

    - one of them drove 100 km/h on a 70 km/h road (that's a severe violation of third degree, resulting in an immediate revocation of your driver's license, a large fine and up to 5 years driving prohibition, as you may know). The cops were such wussies that they 'let this one go' and just gave him a warning
    - the other guy doesn't care for speed limits and drives as fast as he wants, speeding like crazy, just because in his backwards area the police rarely does checkups and there are not many cameras. Let's not forget he drinks alcohol in bars after work every day and he goes behind the while while having drunk 6 freaking beers!! He's lucky his body is accustomed to it and flags Safe on the air meter..

    I am infuriated with people like these.
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    I always beep or let these inconsiderate pr1cks know that they're doing something wrong, it's a small action on my part but it's more likely to deter them in the long run if they are aware that others think they are t0ssers.

    Also, how do you change gear whilst using your phone??
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    (Original post by KingJamesIII)
    I always beep or let these inconsiderate pr1cks know that they're doing something wrong, it's a small action on my part but it's more likely to deter them in the long run if they are aware that others think they are t0ssers.

    Also, how do you change gear whilst using your phone??
    Not that I would use my phone when anything needs to be done e.g. steering or changing gear but at a guess it would be phone in right hand change gear with the left
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    (Original post by RF_PineMarten)
    Using a mobile phone while driving is against the law, is inherently a distracting activity, and is focused on during driving lessons as well as by awareness campaigns. It is not a "very minor lapse of judgement" to use a mobile phone while driving and cause an accident, it is utter stupidity.
    "Inherently a distracting activity" - so is changing the radio station, eating or drinking while you're driving or telling your children to stop messing around in the back seats. We don't create a separate criminal offence for these, nor do we think ridiculously over-the-top penalties for doing these things are necessary. Let's remember the context here - the serious proposition was made that using a mobile phone while driving should lead to a 10 year driving ban. That's utterly ridiculous.

    As it happens, I think talking on a mobile phone is pretty minor. Texting or using the screen is far, far stupider.

    (Original post by BaconandSauce)
    The intent was there.

    She intended to ignore the law and put other peoples lives at risk so she could discuss a shopping trip.

    You think a car journey is risky try it on a cycle or motor cycle.

    Yes that is how it works if you ignore the law you choose to break the law and you are aware of the consequences
    You can hardly invoke the law in defending a position that the law is unsatisfactory and should be changed - in this case, in a completely ludicrous way.

    I'm not sure if you've understood my point on risk there. What I was saying is that driving a vehicle on a public road in any circumstances has risks attached to it: there are thousands of accidents on the roads every year.

    You are suggesting someone engaging in behaviour that causes a risk is somehow extraordinary - by being in a car they were causing a risk in the first place. The issue is one of proportionality. Proportionality becomes completely warped when people suggest silly things like decade-long bans for using a mobile phone during driving.
 
 
 
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