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Am I right to be wary of counsellors

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    (Original post by Dino MD)
    My family has had 5 deaths in 4 years, and since I have injured my shoulder, and haven't been able to lift my right shoulder for 2 years. Needless to say, I'm in a pretty bad place- in constant pain and on very strong painkillers, an insomniac suffering with depression and anxiety having to look after m younger brother and sister (12 and 8) and gran (87). I've tried talking to counsellors- one keeps talking about fate, and the other says everything is my fault, and I can do nothing about it. My GP want me to see another, but I'm genuinely scared- what do I do?
    Hey. I've had a bit of a poor experience with counselors. Mine told me I didn't have OCD (which I later got diagnosed with) and spent most sessions just digging up childhood issues that weren't bothering me while ignoring what was.
    As somebody else has mentioned, counselors can basically be anyone and don't necessarily have a great load of qualifications. You can have some who are big on "fate" and things like that and some who are heavy on the more medical and psychological side of things and some who are frankly just not good. You could spend a lot of time trying to find an decent fit for you or just never find one. Therapy is different and a therapist actually has to have specific training and qualifications. I would suggest this over counseling. You will almost certinally still find it awkward to start with and you may find that one therapist or therapy just isn't the right fit for you, but there's a lot more to ensure that they are actually good at what they do and they have a better understanding of psychology and things like grief, anxiety etc and where they actualy come from. I found therapy far more helpful than counseling and felt a lot more comfortable there too.
    I would go back to your gp and explain that you have had some poor experiences so could you try therapy instead? There are a few different types but CBT is a pretty common one along with basic talking therapy. You can take a look at different types online but you'll most likely just be sent to whoever and they'll know a bit of everything. If you think that a secific one sounds good though do mention it.

    Also just a side note: have you seen an osteopath for your shoulder ever? Both my dad and I used to have issues (my dad spent most of my childhood on a crazy ammount of painkillers for it) and seeing the osteopath was like magic. It's not some airy-fary crystal balls kinda treatment, it's an actual trained professional looking at how you joints and muscles are in a way GPs just aren't capabe of doing. Worth looking into if you haven't already
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    (Original post by Kindred)
    Hey. I've had a bit of a poor experience with counselors. Mine told me I didn't have OCD (which I later got diagnosed with) and spent most sessions just digging up childhood issues that weren't bothering me while ignoring what was.
    As somebody else has mentioned, counselors can basically be anyone and don't necessarily have a great load of qualifications. You can have some who are big on "fate" and things like that and some who are heavy on the more medical and psychological side of things and some who are frankly just not good. You could spend a lot of time trying to find an decent fit for you or just never find one. Therapy is different and a therapist actually has to have specific training and qualifications. I would suggest this over counseling. You will almost certinally still find it awkward to start with and you may find that one therapist or therapy just isn't the right fit for you, but there's a lot more to ensure that they are actually good at what they do and they have a better understanding of psychology and things like grief, anxiety etc and where they actualy come from. I found therapy far more helpful than counseling and felt a lot more comfortable there too.
    I would go back to your gp and explain that you have had some poor experiences so could you try therapy instead? There are a few different types but CBT is a pretty common one along with basic talking therapy. You can take a look at different types online but you'll most likely just be sent to whoever and they'll know a bit of everything. If you think that a secific one sounds good though do mention it.

    Also just a side note: have you seen an osteopath for your shoulder ever? Both my dad and I used to have issues (my dad spent most of my childhood on a crazy ammount of painkillers for it) and seeing the osteopath was like magic. It's not some airy-fary crystal balls kinda treatment, it's an actual trained professional looking at how you joints and muscles are in a way GPs just aren't capabe of doing. Worth looking into if you haven't already
    I've looked into it, but my shoulder is also hypersensitive, which limits the treatments avalible
 
 
 
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Updated: September 24, 2016
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