Comp sci vs Econ

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Four things that unis think matter more than league tables 08-12-2016
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Allow your econ promoting

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    Lol I can't help it
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    Yes it's multidisciplinary and wide scoping, and there's a correlation with top economics degree holders earning high paying jobs.

    Computer science grads on the other hand have the highest unemployment rate. lol.
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOOOL 'correlation'.

    Yeah, but as you can see from statistics at various universities they also have one of the highest straight into employment rates and highest professional job vs nonprofessional job rates, way more than Econ anyway. Sorry dude, econ can't compare

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    Both degrees are good and can land you some really good jobs. Doing economics degree isnt guranteed to land you a top job in investment banking neither will comp sci land you a job at facebook.

    However the thing about computer science having the highest unemployment rate is bs lol. Knowing programming and software development makes you the most employable person ever. You can literally create jobs for yourself, become a free lancer and not even bother applying for jobs at companies. Or even do a start up as soon as you get an idea. Where as in Econ, you need to be working at the big dogs to be making the bucks. I vote for Computer Science in terms of employment
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    (Original post by bigboateng_)
    Both degrees are good and can land you some really good jobs. Doing economics degree isnt guranteed to land you a top job in investment banking neither will comp sci land you a job at facebook.

    However the thing about computer science having the highest unemployment rate is bs lol. Knowing programming and software development makes you the most employable person ever. You can literally create jobs for yourself, become a free lancer and not even bother applying for jobs at companies. Or even do a start up as soon as you get an idea. Where as in Econ, you need to be working at the big dogs to be making the bucks. I vote for Computer Science in terms of employment
    https://www.studyinternational.com/n...oyed-graduates

    You can literally google "computer science highest unemployment rate" and you'd find a ton of articles on it lmaooo

    You dont need a compsci degree to know programming and software development, there are other qualifications and courses
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    https://www.studyinternational.com/n...oyed-graduates

    You can literally google "computer science highest unemployment rate" and you'd find a ton of articles on it lmaooo

    You dont need a compsci degree to know programming and software development, there are other qualifications and courses
    This is ongoing though, same can be said that an individual doesn't need need to learn about the economy through a degree, they could just grab and read a text book instead. (And i do economics btw)
    Also computer science actually has little programming in it
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    https://www.studyinternational.com/n...oyed-graduates

    You can literally google "computer science highest unemployment rate" and you'd find a ton of articles on it lmaooo

    You dont need a compsci degree to know programming and software development, there are other qualifications and courses
    Since you want to throw stats in

    Bristol BSc CompSci (80% employment, 100% professional job)
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Bristol BSc Econ (63% employment, 89% professional job)
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    UCL MEng CompSci (65% employment, 100% professional job, £40k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    UCL BSc Econ (69% employment, 87% professional job, £34k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Durham BSc CompSci (60% employment, 100% professional job, £31k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Durham BA Econ (66% employment, 95% professional job, £30k avg of all start salary achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Birmingham BSc CompSci (90% employment, 95% professional job, £26k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Birmingham BSc Econ (55% employment, 91% professional job, same avg of start salaries):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Could go on.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Since you want to throw stats in

    Bristol BSc CompSci (80% employment, 100% professional job)
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Bristol BSc Econ (63% employment, 89% professional job)
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    UCL MEng CompSci (65% employment, 100% professional job, £40k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    UCL BSc Econ (69% employment, 87% professional job, £34k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Durham BSc CompSci (60% employment, 100% professional job, £31k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Durham BA Econ (66% employment, 95% professional job, £30k avg of all start salary achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Birmingham BSc CompSci (90% employment, 95% professional job, £26k avg of all start salaries achieved):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Birmingham BSc Econ (55% employment, 91% professional job, same avg of start salaries):
    http://m.unistats.ac.uk/Subjects/Ove...eturnTo/Search

    Could go on.

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    How about we look at the full picture instead of cherry picking unis to suit your agenda eh?

    By choosing such a small sample, there are far too many variables that you haven't considered. Maybe econ grads go for tougher jobs hence why they dont get employed straight away. The types of jobs that the two degrees are vastly different too. There are so many other factors that you havent considered either.

    And even as you cherry pick the unis (at one point even naively comparing a masters to a bachelors) the full picture is vastly different.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/j...ich-quick.html

    If you look here, econ grads end up being very high paid in the long term whereas compsci grads seem to be not so highly paid. I guess the econ lot are the ambitious lot whereas the compsci lot are the ones facing an early midlife crisis. Shame.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    This is ongoing though, same can be said that an individual doesn't need need to learn about the economy through a degree, they could just grab and read a text book instead. (And i do economics btw)
    Also computer science actually has little programming in it
    yes but economics is multidisciplinary, it is like that by nature.

    Either way its all besides the point, computer science has overall lower prospects. Sure, Google and Apple are looking for the oxbridge and imperial folk who end up with successful careers but the same can be said for their econ counterparts.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    How about we look at the full picture instead of cherry picking unis to suit your agenda eh?

    By choosing such a small sample, there are far too many variables that you haven't considered. Maybe econ grads go for tougher jobs hence why they dont get employed straight away. The types of jobs that the two degrees are vastly different too. There are so many other factors that you havent considered either.

    And even as you cherry pick the unis (at one point even naively comparing a masters to a bachelors) the full picture is vastly different.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/j...ich-quick.html

    If you look here, econ grads end up being very high paid in the long term whereas compsci grads seem to be not so highly paid. I guess the econ lot are the ambitious lot whereas the compsci lot are the ones facing an early midlife crisis. Shame.
    Nah, I left MEng by mistake when the link is to the BSc because I knew you'd get butthurt.

    Anyway, good luck man, clearly you think Econ is superior and will get you everywhere in life...

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Nah, I left MEng by mistake when the link is to the BSc because I knew you'd get butthurt.

    Anyway, good luck man, clearly you think Econ is superior and will get you everywhere in life...

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    ahh yes. The "i knew you'd get butthurt" and the sarcastic tone has come out.

    Im just here for a classic internet argument and i have to say that im disappointed that you gave up so easily.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    How about we look at the full picture instead of cherry picking unis to suit your agenda eh?

    By choosing such a small sample, there are far too many variables that you haven't considered. Maybe econ grads go for tougher jobs hence why they dont get employed straight away. The types of jobs that the two degrees are vastly different too. There are so many other factors that you havent considered either.

    And even as you cherry pick the unis (at one point even naively comparing a masters to a bachelors) the full picture is vastly different.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/j...ich-quick.html

    If you look here, econ grads end up being very high paid in the long term whereas compsci grads seem to be not so highly paid. I guess the econ lot are the ambitious lot whereas the compsci lot are the ones facing an early midlife crisis. Shame.
    Plus FYI, the source of that article is from Emolument, which severely oversampled for people in the city and not as you put it 'the overall picture'. Now as you're aware, Econ grads tend to want to go into banking more so than any other student of any other degree out there..

    But ofc, that's not cherry picking either :rolleyes:

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Plus FYI, the source of that article is from Emolument, which severely oversampled for people in the city and not as you put it 'the overall picture'. Now as you're aware, Econ grads tend to want to go into banking more so than any other student of any other degree out there..

    But ofc, that's not cherry picking either :rolleyes:

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    As i've already said, you can give it a quick google search where many website reports the same issue; Computer science has the highest unemployment rate.

    It works both ways, you know that banking is the most popular career choice. And as you claim to be an expert, you'd also know how notoriously difficult it is to get into a top job and many grads spend a good time looking for a job, so that's perhaps a reason for why econ grads employment rate is so low. But the fact that they end up earning a lot more than compsci grads in the long term says something.

    Compsci on the other hand, its easy to get a job (according to your stats that highly contradicts other sources) and the top salary package is comparatively lower. Seems like a pretty bleak life to me.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    As i've already said, you can give it a quick google search where many website reports the same issue; Computer science has the highest unemployment rate.

    It works both ways, you know that banking is the most popular career choice. And as you claim to be an expert, you'd also know how notoriously difficult it is to get into a top job and many grads spend a good time looking for a job, so that's perhaps a reason for why econ grads employment rate is so low. But the fact that they end up earning a lot more than compsci grads in the long term says something.

    Compsci on the other hand, its easy to get a job (according to your stats that highly contradicts other sources) and the top salary package is comparatively lower. Seems like a pretty bleak life to me.
    Your main argument is: computer science has the highest unemployment.. I've already SHOWN you that it actually has one of the best employment rates and professional employment rates at any of the decent CS programmes out there but nope.

    Who do you think will get a better job? The Man Met grad with a CS degree and experience or the Man Met grad with an Econ degree and some experience? Considering a) it's a non-target for anything finance related, b) the econ grad wouldn't have any discernible skills, c) the CS grad has in demand skills.

    It is not a fact, anyone who gets an FO banking job (be that an econ, CS, history grad - who cares) will earn more than anyone who doesn't - so your argument that 'their' (econ grads) salary is higher at the peak, with biased banking based data, is off. It's very unrealistic to think that most CompScis would even consider getting an FO gig at a bank - most don't care and would rather code. So focusing on a site where a) it's already biased towards banking and b) econ grads are already biased towards banking, is not only cherry picking but painting an absolutely unrealistic view of the broader picture on graduate salaries over time.

    Again, you're using biased data to make claims on the 'top salary being lower'.. It makes 0 sense. I know for a fact that the salaries available at the likes of the top end of tech not only mirror banking but also have solid upside - but how many people get those jobs? Very few in the grand scheme of things. Likewise for econ and banking. In fact, pretty much any job an Econ grad can get post university a CompSci (or really any degree holder) could easily get. Not so for the other way round.

    IMO, you have a skewed view of a) where the demand in the future is for different skillsets, b) the earnings potential outside of finance is for any regular old nonspecific grad job that an econ grad can attain and c) on this whole BS about unemployment rates.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Your main argument is: computer science has the highest unemployment.. I've already SHOWN you that it actually has one of the best employment rates and professional employment rates at any of the decent CS programmes out there but nope.

    Who do you think will get a better job? The Man Met grad with a CS degree and experience or the Man Met grad with an Econ degree and some experience? Considering a) it's a non-target for anything finance related, b) the econ grad wouldn't have any discernible skills, c) the CS grad has in demand skills.

    It is not a fact, anyone who gets a banking job (be that an econ, CS, history grad - who cares) will earn more than anyone who doesn't. It's very unrealistic to think that most CompScis would even consider getting an FO gig at a bank - most don't care and would rather code. So focusing on a sight where a) it's already biased towards banking and b) econ grads are already biased towards banking, is not only cherry picking but painting an absolutely unrealistic view of the broader picture on graduate salaries over time.

    Again, you're using biased data to make claims on the 'top salary being lower'.. It makes 0 sense. I know for a fact that the salaries available at the likes of the top end of tech not only mirror banking but also have solid upside - but how many people get those jobs? Very few in the grand scheme of things. Likewise for econ and banking. In fact, pretty much any job an Econ grad can get post university a CompSci (or really any degree holder could easily get). Not so for the other way round.

    IMO, you have a skewed view of a) where the demand in the future is for different skillsets, b) the earnings potential outside of finance is for any regular old nonspecific grad job that an econ grad can attain and c) on this whole BS about unemployment rates.

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    LOOL you haven't shown me anything mate. I've already shown you that it does have the highest unemployment rate.

    https://www.thetechpartnership.com/n...e-the-average/

    Here, oh wait, is HESA biased? Im gonna trust this more than the links you pulled from a few unis.

    This is an argument about the degrees, not universities. Cheap straw man.

    Ofc its not a fact that banking earns more and i never claimed that. It was in fact YOU who brought banking into this argument So again, yet another straw man.

    So econ is biased towards banking by nature. So what? Does that change the fact that within both 5 years and 15 years an econ grad will earn more than an equivalent compsci grad? no. You have basically implicitly admitted that the types of jobs compsci grads go for pays less.

    Yes, top tech jobs pay big, but you fail to look at the full picture. You seem to really struggle on this. Sure, on an individual level it is not as clear cut but overall econ grads do do better. It makes total sense, you're just ignorant to the point where you completely ignore the facts when its staring right at you.

    Economics is a multidiscplinary subject. Besides most econ students dont do it to go to a tech job (funny how you made a similar point earlier about compsci but you've tried to use that same logical line of thinking against me). There are literally 8 week courses out there teaching ppl to code and compsci grads dont even use their computational knowledge in many of their jobs. Just because econ grads dont do it, doesnt mean that they cant.

    IMO, you seem to struggle to face the facts and consistently fail to look at the full picture. I've provided you with plenty of links proving that econ grads earn more and compsci grads are the most likely to be unemployed - by quite a far distance.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    LOOL you haven't shown me anything mate. I've already shown you that it does have the highest unemployment rate.

    https://www.thetechpartnership.com/n...e-the-average/

    Here, oh wait, is HESA biased? Im gonna trust this more than the links you pulled from a few unis.

    This is an argument about the degrees, not universities. Cheap straw man.

    Ofc its not a fact that banking earns more and i never claimed that. It was in fact YOU who brought banking into this argument So again, yet another straw man.

    So econ is biased towards banking by nature. So what? Does that change the fact that within both 5 years and 15 years an econ grad will earn more than an equivalent compsci grad? no. You have basically implicitly admitted that the types of jobs compsci grads go for pays less.

    Yes, top tech jobs pay big, but you fail to look at the full picture. You seem to really struggle on this. Sure, on an individual level it is not as clear cut but overall econ grads do do better. It makes total sense, you're just ignorant to the point where you completely ignore the facts when its staring right at you.

    Economics is a multidiscplinary subject. Besides most econ students dont do it to go to a tech job (funny how you made a similar point earlier about compsci but you've tried to use that same logical line of thinking against me). There are literally 8 week courses out there teaching ppl to code and compsci grads dont even use their computational knowledge in many of their jobs. Just because econ grads dont do it, doesnt mean that they cant.

    IMO, you seem to struggle to face the facts and consistently fail to look at the full picture. I've provided you with plenty of links proving that econ grads earn more and compsci grads are the most likely to be unemployed - by quite a far distance.
    LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL

    Nah, I'm off to bed cba.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL

    Nah, I'm off to bed cba.

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    LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL You gave up finally.

    I've picked your argument apart, just accept your future mid life crisis and move on.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL

    Nah, I'm off to bed cba.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    And just to clarify the stuff you put in bold print:

    1. I did ofc mean average salaries of an average grad, dont be so petty.

    2. https://www.google.co.uk/search?num=...k1.wF9Vj32G1CQ

    Here is a quick google search showing some easy coding classes, why waste 27k eh?

    3.Big picture. Refer to the links i gave.

    I didnt do this so i can prove you wrong. It's so people who see this thread get reliable information. You have ofc as usual deliberately ignored the vast majority of my argument showing how incompetent you are. Perhaps a mediocre tech job is right for you and your ego.
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    (Original post by fksociety)
    how incompetent you are. Perhaps a mediocre tech job is right for you and your ego.
    Love you too bbs xoxox

    But seriously no, I need to go to bed quite soon.

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    (Original post by fksociety)
    lol computer science, you can learn to code without a degree in it
    Computer science isn't coding...
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    (Original post by Maton)
    Computer science isn't coding...
    If you had looked at all my posts you would have seen that i did talk about computation.
 
 
 
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