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    (Original post by BobBobson)
    What Uni did you go to?

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    One from top 40 in the uk.
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    (Original post by sh323)
    I've recently graduated from university from a good university and received a 2.1
    degree in mathematics . My advice too anybody thinking about choosing maths as a degree; don't, look elsewhere. I've been unemployed for the last 4 months despite having 13 different interviews. The job market is horrible out there, do something
    that has the skills for a workplace, like accountancy or engineering or a vocational degree. Mathematics is related to very few jobs, don't take it.
    Just saying maths has one of the highest employment rates soo I think that maybe you could be the problem?


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    (Original post by sh323)
    One from top 40 in the uk.
    A 2:1 from a 'top 40' uni in a country with under 130 unis on the ranking tables is decent but hardly spectacular. That's not going to guarantee you a nice graduate job in this day and age unfortunately, you're going to need to do more to make yourself more employable.

    The fact is mathematics has higher employment rates than any of the degrees you've mentioned, so the problem unfortunately may lie with you. Why did you choose to do a maths degree, if you don't mind me asking? And what kind of jobs are you applying for now, are they in any way related to your degree?
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    (Original post by justinawe)
    A 2:1 from a 'top 40' uni in a country with under 130 unis on the ranking tables is decent but hardly spectacular. That's not going to guarantee you a nice graduate job in this day and age unfortunately, you're going to need to do more to make yourself more employable.

    The fact is mathematics has higher employment rates than any of the degrees you've mentioned, so the problem unfortunately may lie with you. Why did you choose to do a maths degree, if you don't mind me asking? And what kind of jobs are you applying for now, are they in any way related to your degree?
    As I thought it would give me a good chance of getting a job looking at the employment figures. Well anything that's maths based, so financial,accountancy,data analysis, things like that.
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    So you chose Mathematics so you'd have a higher chance of getting a job ? Is that the only reason ?

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    One of my best friends did Maths and is a fully qualified actuary earning shedloads.
    As i said you should be thinking why you havent converted any of your interviews and been highly impressed at your high strike rate.
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    13 interviews in 4 months? Sounds like you need better interview skills.

    If anything I would say your maths degree is opening you a lot of doors. You are just not skilled enough to step through them.

    ps I say that being terrible at interviews myself.
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    (Original post by yudothis)
    13 interviews in 4 months? Sounds like you need better interview skills.

    If anything I would say your maths degree is opening you a lot of doors. You are just not skilled enough to step through them.

    ps I say that being terrible at interviews myself.
    Lmao, keeps on hitting the door frame lmao.
    Or doesnt know how to turn the door handle, degree unlocks it lol.


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    (Original post by thatmathsnerd)
    So you chose Mathematics so you'd have a higher chance of getting a job ? Is that the only reason ?

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    No, I enjoy mathematics and thought it could lead to better things for myself, how wrong I was.
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    (Original post by sh323)
    No, I enjoy mathematics and thought it could lead to better things for myself, how wrong I was.
    With this attitude you will never improve.
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    Ive got a job working in a call centre for 6 months, I'll apply to the big companies over the next few months and hopefully have something by the time I leave.
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    (Original post by sh323)
    I've recently graduated from university from a good university and received a 2.1
    degree in mathematics . My advice too anybody thinking about choosing maths as a degree; don't, look elsewhere. I've been unemployed for the last 4 months despite having 13 different interviews. The job market is horrible out there, do something
    that has the skills for a workplace, like accountancy or engineering or a vocational degree. Mathematics is related to very few jobs, don't take it.
    Soo you picked a general academic degree, then proceeded not to put much effort into improving your employment prospects with your free time at uni, then decided not to ask for feedback/improve your interview technique, and finally, you come on a student forum to warn people not to choose a degree because you didn't put in enough grafting to make the most of your degree. Sorry, but there's a distinct lack of sympathy on my behalf.

    You should spend your time improving your prospects and not making woe is me posts on TSR.

    A lot of degrees are academic and general, a lot of grad jobs (70-80% of them) bear no strict requirement to the degree you do + some have a STEM requirement - there really is no reason why a mathematics undergraduate (or really any undergraduate) with the right attitude and CV can't get a decent grad job.

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    Dear, dear, dear. This is a by the textbook example of what NOT to do as a student, such a shame that so many of them fall into this trap.

    1) Student is studying a somewhat respected degree and is on track for a decent grade.
    2) Student becomes smug and expects to be able to waltz into a grad job the second they finish uni.
    3) Student completely neglects the breadth of opportunities available to them (work experience, part-time jobs, internships, university representative opportunities...) and graduates with nothing but a measly piece of paper.
    4) Student is unable to find even the most basic of retail jobs upon graduation.
    5) Student does not bother to come up with a plan B and instead sits around moping, blaming the evil conservative government, and looking for sympathy on the internet.

    And I tell you something, you will get no sympathy whatsoever here, so don't even try. If you can't find a job then you need to take one great big look at yourself, think "Where on Earth did I go wrong?", "Why aren't I good enough for even a part-time warehouse job?", seek to sort yourself out immediately, and do whatever (and I mean whatever) it takes to get yourself into the world of work.
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    THIRTEEN different interviews in 4 months? That's on average almost 1 per week which is pretty good.

    Each interview is a potential job, the fact that you even got interviewed as much as you did shows that your degree IS something that's valued (it should've been obvious in the replies: maths is highly sought after). But, you didn't get the job. It stopped at the interview. The INTERVIEW. What's the bottleneck? Do I have to spell it out?


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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Soo you picked a general academic degree, then proceeded not to put much effort into improving your employment prospects with your free time at uni, then decided not to ask for feedback/improve your interview technique, and finally, you come on a student forum to warn people not to choose a degree because you didn't put in enough grafting to make the most of your degree. Sorry, but there's a distinct lack of sympathy on my behalf.

    You should spend your time improving your prospects and not making woe is me posts on TSR.

    A lot of degrees are academic and general, a lot of grad jobs (70-80% of them) bear no strict requirement to the degree you do + some have a STEM requirement - there really is no reason why a mathematics undergraduate (or really any undergraduate) with the right attitude and CV can't get a decent grad job.

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    I spent alot of free time trying to improve my career prospects at uni, I applied to a ton of internships, but, again they are also alot of applicant's and chances of getting in are slim unless you know somebody. I have gotten strong feedback from my interviews, particularly from the latter interviews I have done, just a stronger candidate or somebody with a more relevant degree has gotten the job. And Im sorry but your last paragraph is just plain wrong; for a "decent" grad job youre talking about 60 applicant's plus per job. The fact is the grad job is insanely competitive and very difficult for alot of strong candidates to get a place.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Dear, dear, dear. This is a by the textbook example of what NOT to do as a student, such a shame that so many of them fall into this trap.

    1) Student is studying a somewhat respected degree and is on track for a decent grade.
    2) Student becomes smug and expects to be able to waltz into a grad job the second they finish uni.
    3) Student completely neglects the breadth of opportunities available to them (work experience, part-time jobs, internships, university representative opportunities...) and graduates with nothing but a measly piece of paper.
    4) Student is unable to find even the most basic of retail jobs upon graduation.
    5) Student does not bother to come up with a plan B and instead sits around moping, blaming the evil conservative government, and looking for sympathy on the internet.

    And I tell you something, you will get no sympathy whatsoever here, so don't even try. If you can't find a job then you need to take one great big look at yourself, think "Where on Earth did I go wrong?", "Why aren't I good enough for even a part-time warehouse job?", seek to sort yourself out immediately, and do whatever (and I mean whatever) it takes to get yourself into the world of work.
    I have not asked for symapthy anywhere In my posts, the point of my meassages was to warn people about the dangers of trying to get a job when not choosing a vocational degree.
    I have always done at least part time work, I have been able now to get myself into some sort of office work, hopefully it will lead to a grad job that involves maths in some way.
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    (Original post by sh323)
    I've recently graduated from university from a good university and received a 2.1
    degree in mathematics . My advice too anybody thinking about choosing maths as a degree; don't, look elsewhere. I've been unemployed for the last 4 months despite having 13 different interviews. The job market is horrible out there, do something
    that has the skills for a workplace, like accountancy or engineering or a vocational degree. Mathematics is related to very few jobs, don't take it.
    :yawn: Another disillusioned graduate who thinks having a degree is a one way ticket to a dream job.
    Almost everyone has a degree nowadays (just in case you didn't know) and if you can't convince them that you'll do a great job at the interview then its definitely you, not the employers at fault for not giving you a job.

    I know a lot of Mathematics graduates who are employed, but thats because they stood out at interviews and they didn't solely rely on their degree to get a job.

    (Original post by Dann.It)
    Lol. Have you thought that maybe, you're the reason behind your unemployment. Maybe you just sucked during interviews in comparison to other candidates, therefore you not having a job.

    Oh and having a degree doesn't automatically guarantees you a job. It merely is just a stepping stone, and the foundation of getting a job.
    Words of the truth.
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    Yes, I have to agree with #ChaosKass here. Loads of students these days think they can just coast through uni, bag an easy 2:1 or 1st, and end up in a high-paying job just like that.

    First class degrees are a dime a dozen these days, you really need to stand out from the crowd or it'll be a life on the dole.
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    (Original post by sh323)
    Nope. A lot of mathematicians are some of the cleverest people you'll meet.
    True... employers like people who do a maths degree , they find it attractive because of the problem solving skills but also their logical thinking they have towards problems.
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    (Original post by xianlong)
    If you enjoy it why aren't you better at it? The problem isn't maths - it's that you're not particularly smart or useful to employers. A 2:1 from a uni scraping into the top 40 is mediocre at best
    What an absurd and ridiculous comment to make. "If you enjoy it why arent you better at it?". Plenty of people enjoy doing different things and there is no relation at how good that makes them at it.

    And cheers for attempting to downgrade my accomplishments in life. Thanks for that.
 
 
 
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