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Do a STEM degree if you want a job Watch

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    O gud

    i am doin maths degree

    i am future safe

    thx op, ur a life savr
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    I agree 100%, In my case I don't look for a degree first then see what jobs it lead to, I look at the well paying job first and see what degree I need to get to that, at the end of the day its all about putting food on the table, but If you're doing a degree that u enjoy and it leads to well paying job then that's great aswell
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    (Original post by akbar0123)
    Not really, no. It's the finance, business, retail jobs that will go first. For example, jobs in financial markets trading have already been automated to a large extent. Accounting will also be automated heavily in the future. STEM jobs require more skills and therefore are harder to automate.
    As a STEM grad, STEM subjects are absolutely the most vulnerable. Difficult but repetitive tasks are far more vulnerable to automation compared with soft/human skills. You mentioned accountancy, and I can tell you, it's the arithmetic more than the soft parts which are being automated.
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    (Original post by SunnysideSea)
    What a load of *******s. Any degree in History, English, Philosophy, Geography, Theology, Languages etc. from a top 20 uni is more than enough to qualify you for a huge range of very well paid, respected professions. From accountancy to law, from management consultancy to MI5. Seriously, do some research. Many businesses don't want to hire an entire workforce of interchangeabe, socially inept, uncommunicative, unimaginative STEM drones. Business, people forget, is primarily something done between people, for people. Hence why most of the senior management positions in business and the civil service are dominated by non-STEM students.
    If you're going to form an argument, it might suit your narrative if you refrain from blanket statements and unfounded accusations.

    According to Which, the top ten degree disciplines in accordance to average starting salaries were: Dentistry, Medicine, Maths, Chemical Engineering, Marine Technology, Economics, Aerospace Engineering, Statistics and Veterinary Science. With the exclusion of Economics, all of the aforementioned disciplines can be categorised in the STEM group.

    Your saying that STEM students are "socially inept" and "uncommunicative" is immature and unfounded. If you have any evidence that STEM students are social pariahs then feel free to provide evidence for it, otherwise refrain.

    Again, the notion that non-STEM degree disciplines dominate senior management positions is another unfounded myth. If you have any evidence to the contrary, again, feel free to provide evidence for it.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Right, so you've researched every single thing you can do with every single non-STEM degree?

    My sister did a non-STEM degree. She walked right out of uni into a job.
    What degree did she do? I'm curious
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    (Original post by medhelp)
    What degree did she do? I'm curious
    Psychology. She worked in the nhs for a while and news in a prison.
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    Imo the issue isn't people doing non-STEM degrees, but just not having a clear idea of where they want to go after university and what career they want.
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    (Original post by ForestShadow)
    tbf, no one forced you to read/agree with OP :holmes:
    The reference was about the OP telling someone what degree they should be doing.
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    Ultimately you should pursue what you're interested in, that way you are more likely to succeed in that field and also be happy during uni
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    (Original post by lostintrnslation)
    well that's funny because people who studied modern foreign languages degrees are some of the most employable graduates out there...
    Why? Many of them are not competitive with European citizens who speak multiple languages at a greater level and certainly cannot hope to learn asian languages such as Mandarin within the space of 3-4 years.
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    (Original post by jake4198)
    If you're going to form an argument, it might suit your narrative if you refrain from blanket statements and unfounded accusations.

    According to Which, the top ten degree disciplines in accordance to average starting salaries were: Dentistry, Medicine, Maths, Chemical Engineering, Marine Technology, Economics, Aerospace Engineering, Statistics and Veterinary Science. With the exclusion of Economics, all of the aforementioned disciplines can be categorised in the STEM group.

    Your saying that STEM students are "socially inept" and "uncommunicative" is immature and unfounded. If you have any evidence that STEM students are social pariahs then feel free to provide evidence for it, otherwise refrain.

    Again, the notion that non-STEM degree disciplines dominate senior management positions is another unfounded myth. If you have any evidence to the contrary, again, feel free to provide evidence for it.
    I'd just like to point out that medicine and dentistry (and I'd imagine veterinary science) are *not* STEM degrees, and are not classified as such by most authorities.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Psychology. She worked in the nhs for a while and news in a prison.
    Psychology is a STEM degree.
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    The STEM w***fest returns. What would TSR be without it?
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    but some things have utility beyond been employed, and some don't.

    I can give the example of myself to explain what I mean by that, been autistic I don't connect with people and this can be difficult it can also effect job interviews for obvious reasons. So when I look at a degree subject to pursue of course I think about employment but I also think about the worst case scenario unemployment. Now I have been unemployed for reasonably long periods of time before and made a living playing online poker and gambling on sports when the right promos. Btw I once found a thread about that on here it looked really good but can't find it now if anyone can link me to it that would be great.

    anyway Poker is not a long term career path anymore for many reasons but I wont deviate here. However there are other ways I could use my own maths skills (that I would obtain with a maths degree) to make money in the event of unemployment. It would be much more difficult for me to do that with say a history degree, I am not saying it would be impossible I mean maybe a YouTube channel with Patron but still much more difficult. IT degree might teach me how to make my own websites/apps maybe revenue in that.

    Just in my degree I want a skill that is in demand and needed by employers but also which if I cannot get employed I can use the skills myself to bring money in. Maths fits this strongly.
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    (Original post by akbar0123)
    STEM degrees give you proper skills that will get you a good job, as long as you're not an idiot in social situations. And those careers are less likely to be automated, unlike finance, banking, business, retail which are already replacing humans with AI.

    So don't just do what you enjoy. Do something that will get you a job that's future proof.
    Totally agree with OP 100%. I've seen and read numerous times, people who know (or ought to know) estimate 30% of jobs will disappear due to automation in the next decade. Not just by robotics. As AI becomes more advanced and sophisticated, even supposedly safe middle class professions will become redundant.

    If you enjoy a subject, study it in you free time. Go to the library, buy dirt cheap second hand books from Amazon (I'm back at uni and have built up a collection of > 200 degree lvl text books, at least half was for < £10. and these are texts that sell at > £50 for new copies!). Doing any degree that isn't STEM or medicine, computer science is really not clever.

    Edit: unless your (or you yourself) family is minted, in which case, well you can pretty much do whatever you want with your life!
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    I often feel that with STEM it's not as important where you gain your degree, whereas with art degrees it is essential. Of my siblings, my sister who studied history at Durham is doing the best financially. My other siblings studied STEM and earn ~ a third of what she does. She works for a law firm in London, and earns an insane amount. She loves her job and finds it extremely stimulating. Her history class mates have gone on to incredibly diverse and interesting careers. Now, if she had studied history at say... Liverpool (a respectable red brick university, but not the 'standard' of Durham/Oxbridge) she would have struggled to break into law in London - she admits it herself.
    The STEM 'master race' rhetoric is complete nonsense and I advise anyone and everyone to ignore it. What people on this website can't seem to grasp is that a degree isn't everything, employers just don't care that much, they really don't. They want hard working, social individuals who can function within a team. I know plenty of successful people who have studied STEM and the arts.
    I myself plan to apply to Oxford to study history, as well as Durham, York etc... I do not worry one bit about my career prospects. I want to study history because that's where my passions lie - whilst at university I can intern etc and find what I want to do. The only thing I will say is that STEM degrees are more vocational, so you can go to a lower ranking institution and still find a graduate job. For arts subjects, that is less likely. If you can get into a top 10 university, you have nothing to worry about.
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    (Original post by Oddwatermelon)
    I often feel that with STEM it's not as important where you gain your degree, whereas with art degrees it is essential. Of my siblings, my sister who studied history at Durham is doing the best financially. My other siblings studied STEM and earn ~ a third of what she does. She works for a law firm in London, and earns an insane amount. She loves her job and finds it extremely stimulating. Her history class mates have gone on to incredibly diverse and interesting careers. Now, if she had studied history at say... Liverpool (a respectable red brick university, but not the 'standard' of Durham/Oxbridge) she would have struggled to break into law in London - she admits it herself.
    The STEM 'master race' rhetoric is complete nonsense and I advise anyone and everyone to ignore it. What people on this website can't seem to grasp is that a degree isn't everything, employers just don't care that much, they really don't. They want hard working, social individuals who can function within a team. I know plenty of successful people who have studied STEM and the arts.
    I myself plan to apply to Oxford to study history, as well as Durham, York etc... I do not worry one bit about my career prospects. I want to study history because that's where my passions lie - whilst at university I can intern etc and find what I want to do. The only thing I will say is that STEM degrees are more vocational, so you can go to a lower ranking institution and still find a graduate job. For arts subjects, that is less likely. If you can get into a top 10 university, you have nothing to worry about.
    Truth.

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    (Original post by Paraphilos)
    Why? Many of them are not competitive with European citizens who speak multiple languages at a greater level and certainly cannot hope to learn asian languages such as Mandarin within the space of 3-4 years.
    have a look at some of these:
    https://www.dur.ac.uk/mlac/undergraduate/employability/
    https://www.theguardian.com/educatio...modules-degree
    http://www.trainingzone.co.uk/develo...-employability

    as there are so few people who study languages, it is way easier to leave uni and walk in to a job as there is less competition. furthermore, as international relations are incredibly important and britain is leaving the eu, we will need even more british linguists as we cannot rely on other countries anymore. this eliminates competition with european citizens who have, in most cases, received a better education in regards to languages. doing a degree in a modern foreign language gives you near-native or native levels of fluency. some students even study more than one language at university.
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    (Original post by akbar0123)
    In today's world, graduate jobs are highly competitive and there are loads and loads of people with generic degrees like history or politics. Meanwhile, the engineering tech sectors are hiring and are future proof careers as well.

    In the near future, more and more jobs will become automated. The ones that won't be are STEM jobs like engineering or tech or life sciences related stuff. So it is a very stupid idea to do a non-STEM degree now since you will be out of a job in the future and will also a truffle to even get a job in the first place, as shown by the large number of humanities students working in McDonald's.

    STEM degrees give you proper skills that will get you a good job, as long as you're not an idiot in social situations. And those careers are less likely to be automated, unlike finance, banking, business, retail which are already replacing humans with AI.

    So don't just do what you enjoy. Do something that will get you a job that's future proof.
    It's not about what you study it's more about where you study and who you know in this current economic climate
 
 
 
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