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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    investment banking
    ^ this, especially TMT coverage.

    Would add algo trading, strats, regular S&T etc etc

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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    What made you stop wanting to do Consultancy? My plan is either IT or Computer Sci, however IT Constants have a higher salary than Software Engineers and the job seems to be more social/fun. What made you want to stop doing it? Thanks
    There are a few reasons.

    1. The long hours
    If a client has paid for a days consultancy, they expect you to be with them for seven or eight hours. The average travel time for me to either home or my next hotel was two hours each way. This adds up to at least sixty hours per week.
    It's not nice to come home at midnight, leaving again at 5am to be at a 9am appointment in Dublin, to then come home again at 10PM. The company is only interested in paid time, they generally don't give you any admin time, this happens in your own free time.

    2. Staying away from home
    I used to stay away a few nights a week, my home felt like a self storage depot.
    My schedule for a long time was to get home late Friday night, do my washing.
    Sleep most of the weekend, pack a whole weeks worth of clothes and travel Sunday night to a hotel. This avoided a very early start Monday morning.
    All this time away is very bad for relationships and friendships.

    3. The role becomes very boring
    You're a glorified salesman, you are either recommending solutions based on your company's own products or that of their partners.
    A lot of reports and recommendations are cut and paste from the same work you did last week.

    4. Money
    Flying business class, staying in 4 / 5 star hotels is nice, but it's an expensive lifestyle. The company cars are wonderful, but it isn't your own and the boot is full of work related folders and equipment.
    It's a very expensive lifestyle, you don't have time to shop around for the best deals, if you need something, you get it from the most convenient place and not the cheapest.

    I don't want to be all doom and gloom,
    I had some wonderful experiences and generally the customers were fantastic.

    If you do it when you graduate, then you can have an amazing time.
    Just be prepared to have the next career move ready before it becomes too much.

    Sadly many of my colleagues had rather bad personal "habits" to keep them going the whole week.
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    (Original post by st*r)
    There are a few reasons.

    1. The long hours
    If a client has paid for a days consultancy, they expect you to be with them for seven or eight hours. The average travel time for me to either home or my next hotel was two hours each way. This adds up to at least sixty hours per week.
    It's not nice to come home at midnight, leaving again at 5am to be at a 9am appointment in Dublin, to then come home again at 10PM. The company is only interested in paid time, they generally don't give you any admin time, this happens in your own free time.

    2. Staying away from home
    I used to stay away a few nights a week, my home felt like a self storage depot.
    My schedule for a long time was to get home late Friday night, do my washing.
    Sleep most of the weekend, pack a whole weeks worth of clothes and travel Sunday night to a hotel. This avoided a very early start Monday morning.
    All this time away is very bad for relationships and friendships.

    3. The role becomes very boring
    You're a glorified salesman, you are either recommending solutions based on your company's own products or that of their partners.
    A lot of reports and recommendations are cut and paste from the same work you did last week.

    4. Money
    Flying business class, staying in 4 / 5 star hotels is nice, but it's an expensive lifestyle. The company cars are wonderful, but it isn't your own and the boot is full of work related folders and equipment.
    It's a very expensive lifestyle, you don't have time to shop around for the best deals, if you need something, you get it from the most convenient place and not the cheapest.

    I don't want to be all doom and gloom,
    I had some wonderful experiences and generally the customers were fantastic.

    If you do it when you graduate, then you can have an amazing time.
    Just be prepared to have the next career move ready before it becomes too much.

    Sadly many of my colleagues had rather bad personal "habits" to keep them going the whole week.
    Wow. Thanks for all the information, dude. Thats really helped me out a lot. One of my plans is to maybe become an IT Consultant if I end up doing IT&Business Managent after college. According to PayScale, the average pay is 39k, which seems really good, and can increase even more with bonuses/commission etc - so it seems all good, but thanks for giving me an insight on the job. Is the pay worth it in the end? All the trouble etc? Thank you
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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    Wow. Thanks for all the information, dude. Thats really helped me out a lot. One of my plans is to maybe become an IT Consultant if I end up doing IT&Business Managent after college. According to PayScale, the average pay is 39k, which seems really good, and can increase even more with bonuses/commission etc - so it seems all good, but thanks for giving me an insight on the job. Is the pay worth it in the end? All the trouble etc? Thank you
    I was earning enough at the time to start paying 40% tax.

    Nearly all the best paying employers want your soul, they will own you.
    You need to think about your whole life and strike a balance.

    There are high wages in London, but living / commuting costs are higher.
    In the midlands you could earn easily earn 30K and buy a house for 150K

    If you really just want money, get a job in a rich Middle Eastern country.
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    (Original post by st*r)
    I was earning enough at the time to start paying 40% tax.

    Nearly all the best paying employers want your soul, they will own you.
    You need to think about your whole life and strike a balance.

    There are high wages in London, but living / commuting costs are higher.
    In the midlands you could earn easily earn 30K and buy a house for 150K

    If you really just want money, get a job in a rich Middle Eastern country.
    Yeah actually, I've always wanted to work abroad like the Middle East or America - and they pay you more there, dont they. I'm still unsure whether to pursue IT or Computer Science though. From what you know, is Computer Sci very mathsy? A lot of unis want Maths A-Level, but some also dont. Is that Maths THAT hard? I never liked maths but also wasn't that bad.

    Thanks for all these replies by the way, you've really told me a lot
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    (Original post by st*r)
    I was earning enough at the time to start paying 40% tax.

    Nearly all the best paying employers want your soul, they will own you.
    You need to think about your whole life and strike a balance.

    There are high wages in London, but living / commuting costs are higher.
    In the midlands you could earn easily earn 30K and buy a house for 150K

    If you really just want money, get a job in a rich Middle Eastern country.
    Also, what is making you now pursue Computer Science? What about the jobs interest you?
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    (Original post by st*r)
    There are a few reasons.

    1. The long hours
    If a client has paid for a days consultancy, they expect you to be with them for seven or eight hours. The average travel time for me to either home or my next hotel was two hours each way. This adds up to at least sixty hours per week.
    It's not nice to come home at midnight, leaving again at 5am to be at a 9am appointment in Dublin, to then come home again at 10PM. The company is only interested in paid time, they generally don't give you any admin time, this happens in your own free time.

    2. Staying away from home
    I used to stay away a few nights a week, my home felt like a self storage depot.
    My schedule for a long time was to get home late Friday night, do my washing.
    Sleep most of the weekend, pack a whole weeks worth of clothes and travel Sunday night to a hotel. This avoided a very early start Monday morning.
    All this time away is very bad for relationships and friendships.

    3. The role becomes very boring
    You're a glorified salesman, you are either recommending solutions based on your company's own products or that of their partners.
    A lot of reports and recommendations are cut and paste from the same work you did last week.

    4. Money
    Flying business class, staying in 4 / 5 star hotels is nice, but it's an expensive lifestyle. The company cars are wonderful, but it isn't your own and the boot is full of work related folders and equipment.
    It's a very expensive lifestyle, you don't have time to shop around for the best deals, if you need something, you get it from the most convenient place and not the cheapest.

    I don't want to be all doom and gloom,
    I had some wonderful experiences and generally the customers were fantastic.

    If you do it when you graduate, then you can have an amazing time.
    Just be prepared to have the next career move ready before it becomes too much.

    Sadly many of my colleagues had rather bad personal "habits" to keep them going the whole week.
    Sounds like you had a cool job to me.

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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    Also, what is making you now pursue Computer Science? What about the jobs interest you?
    Nearly all the jobs now specify BSc Comp Sci 2.1 or above.
    If you don't tick this box, you don't make the short list which the hiring manager will see.

    Until now I've done mainly IT work, such as servers and networks.
    I would like to move into development.
    Over the years I've seen many application programmers outsourced to countries like India.
    Therefore I'm thinking of moving into embedded systems where I think there is more stability and this will complement the electronics I did at college.

    Things may change in next few years, but with a broad computer science degree, I should have a good choice of vacancies.
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    (Original post by nerdling_CompSci)
    Sounds like you had a cool job to me.

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    It was a cool job, but the hours and stress are bad.
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    (Original post by st*r)
    Nearly all the jobs now specify BSc Comp Sci 2.1 or above.
    If you don't tick this box, you don't make the short list which the hiring manager will see.

    Until now I've done mainly IT work, such as servers and networks.
    I would like to move into development.
    Over the years I've seen many application programmers outsourced to countries like India.
    Therefore I'm thinking of moving into embedded systems where I think there is more stability and this will complement the electronics I did at college.

    Things may change in next few years, but with a broad computer science degree, I should have a good choice of vacancies.
    Yeah I've heard quite a lot about that. That companies are starting to outsource software engineers etc to places like India, and that they value knowledge over technical skill in the IT business. Can you still become an IT Consultant with a Computer Sci degree?
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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    Yeah I've heard quite a lot about that. That companies are starting to outsource software engineers etc to places like India, and that they value knowledge over technical skill in the IT business. Can you still become an IT Consultant with a Computer Sci degree?
    I think most companies will be happy with any technical degree.

    Have you looked at which companies employ graduates and their requirements?
    There should be some good threads in the careers section.
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    (Original post by st*r)
    I think most companies will be happy with an technical degree.

    Have you looked at which companies employ graduates and their requirements?
    There should be some good threads in the careers section.
    I'm not sure where to look. It's not like I'll end up working for google or anything (that would be amazing though).
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    Depends on what you're hoping to start on.

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    (Original post by JorahMormont)
    I'm not sure where to look. It's not like I'll end up working for google or anything (that would be amazing though).
    Would you like to work at somewhere like Google, Microsoft or Amazon?
    If so why?
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    A lot of good jobs in the tech industry, especially the SDLC (Think PM, Dev's, BA, QA etc). You don't even have to be at a top company for a really good salary - and if you get into contracting, usually at least a day rate of £300-£500, with experience this goes up a lot as well.
    Point in hand, there are so many varied opportunities, I don't think you can go wrong!
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    (Original post by st*r)
    Would you like to work at somewhere like Google, Microsoft or Amazon?
    If so why?
    Yeah definitely! Wasn't Google rated one of the best places to work? From what I've seen, it seems very chilled out, has amazing offices and a really nice workplace. As well as basically working for some of the biggest companies in the world, know what I mean? Microsoft for example - one of the biggest tech companies in the world - lots of power and potential to create.
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    (Original post by mashbbk)
    A lot of good jobs in the tech industry, especially the SDLC (Think PM, Dev's, BA, QA etc). You don't even have to be at a top company for a really good salary - and if you get into contracting, usually at least a day rate of £300-£500, with experience this goes up a lot as well.
    Point in hand, there are so many varied opportunities, I don't think you can go wrong!
    This. Contracting is very lucrative. There are generally a few options for good money:

    1. Make it big with a big name company like google.
    2. Find a smaller company with lots of money. Easier to make yourself indispensable and you can get good money for that.
    3. After 3-5 years, contracting becomes a possibility. 300-500 when you first take it up, and a lot more when you become experienced. This can actually pay way more then #1 and #2

    I'm on over 50k 2 years after graduating having gone for #2. I can stick it out here and end up on 120k+. But I am thinking about #3 TBH.
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    After taking CS at uni, is it still possible to become an actuary??
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    (Original post by shyperson)
    After taking CS at uni, is it still possible to become an actuary??
    yh

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Nah, It would be a pre-IPO large startup like Uber/Snapchat. SC paid ~$300-400k over 4 years in pre-IPO (i.e. you can't sell them easily) RSUs to new grads last year.

    In terms of very liquid comp however, yes, Google/FB/Netflix (tho netflix only hires senior professionals) would be the best alongside the HFT/prop trading shops.

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    Yes, that is true, though I would note that Google and the like are quite nice for both career progression and the benefits (including the general environment, catering, etc).
 
 
 
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