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    (Original post by McGeadie)
    Good luck with that, I finished my Standard Grades this year and I think they went allright. I'll let you know the results when they get in. Erk, only 18 days left.
    hehe good luck!! i hope mine go ok - i need AAB including history...its so easy for my to have just missed those grades :O
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    I put up tabs in my house and chose topics to study every week that I were unsure of - I remember in May I put 'USA in the 1920s' tabs iall over the house for history and wrote phrases like 'Laissez-Faire was a replubican policy' etc.

    It was phenomenally successful and I instantly absorbed the information on the tabs from looking at them every time I woke up and when I came home from school. I definitely performed more condidently in the exam, because I knew all the facts.

    I STRONGLY advise anyone who struggles with revision to chose this method - it doesn't involve tonnes of reading and headaches - it just involves you cutting up piece of paper and sticking them on the wall then writing out facts that you are unsure of and gradually learning them (the BBC Bitesize site was very helpful)
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    Over the 4 exam periods spanning the two years of A-level, my revision scheme developed into this:

    1) Do a revision plan at the start of each week, setting 3 or 4 tasks to be done per day, with space to tick them off as you do them.

    2) Do a checklist for every module you are taking, dividing each module into subtopics, and each subtopic into... sub subtopics (!). Use the syllabus to ensure you are covering everything. When you revise, revise one subtopic per session and aim to spend about an hour learning the notes on it and doing practice past paper questions about the subtopic concerned. Take a break, then do the same thing with a different module.

    3) If you have time, do a full set of revision notes for each module, using your class notes, textbook and syllabus. Make sure everything you have to know is in there. Use lots of colours and patterns to help you remember the stuff. When you have learnt it, give the notes to someone and regurgitate (not sure about spelling!) the whole lot without stopping. Anything you miss, learn again. I found this method great for chemistry, but with subjects lke maths there is little point in doing this because its more the method yoiu need to practice, not facts you need to learn.

    4) With key ideas, do colourful A4 sized posters and stick them up on your wall.

    5) Make a checklist of past papers to track your progress, with columns: Started, Completed and Marked. When you mark a past paper, go through it carefully and understand it.

    6) Have a revision organiser file for each subject, with seperate compartments for different modules, past papers, revision lists, syllabuses etc.

    7) Think of more things to do and make checklists about them. When it comes to revision, I swear by checklists. They are the key to success!
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    (Original post by historyhoney)
    use your free periods wisely I've been told
    Yep, make sure you go for plenty of trips to the pub/random drives when people pass their driving test!
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    Make a revision timetable, and stick to it.

    For sciences and maths I find it's generally sufficient to just get a pile of past papers and go through them until you find something you can't do, look it up and keep going. Make a list of anything you got very wrong (i.e. lost more than 2 marks on a question) and do those questions again. Repeat.

    For other subjects, compress all relevant notes down into a few pages, use colour and small diagrams/pictures if it will help, keep compressing it, when you're down to as little as you can get, start looking through them, you'll probably remember most of it from writing it out and drawing pictures by that stage anyway.

    That's what's generally worked for me so far, guess I'll know for sure on the 19th though.
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    I have always found that you should NEVER revise after about 5pm the night before a morning exam, because you need to allow time for your long term memory to assimilate what you study.

    What works best, when you need to learn facts, or equations, and possibly dates. Read them, write them down in chronological order on a sheet, or just scribe out your equations. Then read about three aloud in a row, before getting up, walking round your lower house and saying them in order over and over again. Sit down, do it for the next few, and then try and picture it all in your mind. At the end turn over the page, try and write as many as you can on the back of the sheet, in order if possible.

    If you miss any, start the whole process again.

    Whenever you are relaxing in front of the television, try and recall the equations, or facts. Try and write out all the information you can from memory when you have an idle moment. Recalling information is the key, and knowing what level of content to look at is also vital.

    Best of luck to you.
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    (Original post by theoffender)
    6) Have a revision organiser file for each subject, with seperate compartments for different modules, past papers, revision lists, syllabuses etc.

    7) Think of more things to do and make checklists about them. When it comes to revision, I swear by checklists. They are the key to success!
    I agree, organisation is the key to good revision!
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    Re-writing your class notes really is a duplication of effort (and doesn't really help me). If find bullet pointing really helps (if you do EDEXCEL Biology, you'll know that the textbooks seem to have verbal diarrhoea). As long as you've got the main gist of it, you'll be alright.

    With chemistry, it's really a case of wirting out eqns + drawing out structures with organic. I found organic ok, because it's really very logical.

    Oh, and stick post-it notes with definitions etc. around various conspicuous places in the house. When you see them, hopefully it will trigger something.
    Helps with all the integrals you have to remember in P3 Maths.

    (oh, and one more tip for maths: it's just practice. Get hold of all the past papers + go through review exercises. If you can do all the review questions, you'll ace the exam)

    I used different revision techniques for different subjects.

    For history I just shortened my notes and used post-its.
    Chemistry I could just remember it so easily I just read my notes through
    For music it was key cards.

    But i think a key thing in revision is organisation and keeping yourself motivated.
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    wow thanks everyone for all the advice!! i definitely agree that you have to plan your revision. i also think that, for me personally, i have to leave myself enough time to do sufficient revision + also by working consistently throughout the year you won't need to do so much last minute as such.

    Good Luck to everyone for the 19th, and congrats to all the Scottish candidates out there - i hope you're all happy with your results, and if not remember you still have options open to you!

    Super_Woman

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    Do not underestimate the power of all-nighters, group study sessions and good old fashioned cramming... It's probably unhealthy but it works.
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    i found that i actually learned half my syllabi in the lessons themselves- i'd remember the teacher actually teachignthe idea/concept/word etc to me, and it stuck ever since. of course this relies largely on the teaching you recieve being excellent as well, but if you can find a way of remembering what was taught in the class, in the exact way it was taught/when the penny dropped, make a note of it.

    the power of cramming IS underestimated- in particular post-it-notes on the bathroom mirror whilst you're brushing your teeth the morning of the exam
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    (Original post by Super_Woman)
    I've finally chosen my uni's that i wanna go to next year (i think!) and as
    some of them require fairly high entrace requirements, i was wondering if anyones got any good revision tips/techniques that got you As/Bs?
    i know i'm gonna work my ass off over the next year but i think it's how you
    revise that is just as, if not more, important than how hard you work..

    thanks
    It's a bit early to be thinking about exams!

    Wht do u want to do at uni?
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    (Original post by IamOllie)
    It's a bit early to be thinking about exams!

    Wht do u want to do at uni?
    lol i know, i just wanted to start researching new ways of revising which may be useful. i want to do economics btw.

    Thanks Priya and Wiseone for your replies. lol, i heavily crammed before my Business & Economics exams (they were on the same day) - i just hope i'll still be laughing on thursday :confused:

    Super_Woman

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    I spent ages revising just for my GCSE's, I know, It's madness. I basically would read something; from a revision guide, textbook, the book Iused at school - it's all good, and then I would read it, and actually read it properly, and slowly. Then I would look away and just think for a while about what I just read and try to make sense of it, and then write it down and explain it, understanding why something is the answer is better than knowing that it is the answer if that makes sense. If I realised that I couldn't really explain it without having a peek at the book I wouldn't let myself cheat, I'd read it again, have a think and then write it again, and then when I'd finished I'd read through my notes every now and then, (I started this about a week before each exam, for AS I'll make it a few weeks) and then the day before I would try the writing process all over again but slightly less detailed then origionally. That ought to get it stuck in your head.
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    Super_Woman - I know I'll be laughing on Thursday, albeit Hysterically.
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    (Original post by Swing)
    I spent ages revising just for my GCSE's, I know, It's madness. I basically would read something; from a revision guide, textbook, the book Iused at school - it's all good, and then I would read it, and actually read it properly, and slowly. Then I would look away and just think for a while about what I just read and try to make sense of it, and then write it down and explain it, understanding why something is the answer is better than knowing that it is the answer if that makes sense. If I realised that I couldn't really explain it without having a peek at the book I wouldn't let myself cheat, I'd read it again, have a think and then write it again, and then when I'd finished I'd read through my notes every now and then, (I started this about a week before each exam, for AS I'll make it a few weeks) and then the day before I would try the writing process all over again but slightly less detailed then origionally. That ought to get it stuck in your head.
    You sound sorted! Keep up with the good revision and you'll fly through AS (Unlike my sister who is going to be absolutely shocked by AS levels as she did little work for her GCSEs despite her potential to do very well)
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    (Original post by SiAnY)
    You sound sorted! Keep up with the good revision and you'll fly through AS (Unlike my sister who is going to be absolutely shocked by AS levels as she did little work for her GCSEs despite her potential to do very well)
    My sister is clever but never revises or works hard, and she only got A,B,B,D at AS and then dropped biology since she got a D in it. She then got 6/6 rejections from various unis and so realised she has to work and has revised a bit for her A2's since she needs A,A,B. I've just realised what she has sooner.
 
 
 

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