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why do people simply not care when it comes to clivilians getting killed in Syria? Watch

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    I just don't care. People die every day.
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    Because they bought it upon themselves.
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    Can you please expand on "people" as that is a bit of a catch-all
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    Why should I care? All it will do is cause me misery. No sympathy is the best way to go.
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    (Original post by mkap)
    seriously i look at the news and it just depresses me and upsets me. Syria has been bombed now for the past couple of years and all we see is civilian deaths one after another and once in a blue moon we hear that an ISIS member has been killed.

    is it really worth it i mean why are the russians so dumb bombing the few hospitals that are left (are they really that backwards at dropping missiles) and bombing houses leaving people with no food and water. it just makes me so angry seeing little children left without families and becoming orphans.

    as a society we arnt doing much to help, we are closing our doors to them and saying they dont belong with us. we just close our eyes and just carry on with out individualist lives when these are out brothers and sisters

    just look at these videos, do these people really deserve this? they might be a bit graphic
    Spoiler:
    Show

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrJ1Ac66Ru8

    statistics: total death count in Syria:
    450,000 - Children: 50,000 thats like the whole of Liverpool being wiped out

    It comes down to this....

    Is it our problem to sort out?


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    (Original post by Eulers_)
    Come on, moving country isn't like picking daisies. These people can't just move themselves and their families. Not to mention the fact that the vast majority of these people have lived under Islam or non-democratic regimes their entire lives,
    The choice isn't about moving; the choice is about them (as a people) implementing a sensible system of government and not acquiescing or conniving in an Islamist, tribal or nationalist one - just as the British and other Europeans did.

    They aren't heading for that now, and don't appear to want it, just like all the other countries that wasted the effort of going through the so-called Arab Spring. They want to live under Islam, or a tribal government. But they have to live with the consequences of making that choice. One of those consequences is that they are anathema to westerners who do not wish to import similar instability when their choices result in disaster.
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    Many reasons:

    1) Thousands of miles away, not our problem, bigger problems closer to home.

    2) War weariness, after Iraq and Afghanistan the British public and government really aren't in the mood for any more boots on the ground intervention.

    3) Boredom with the media banging on about Syrian refugees all the time. Even the Express has to vary its Diana/Maddy McCann/'worst winter in 100 years' stories every now and then.

    4) Boredom with morality warriors telling us that we should all feel guilty for not giving the refugees our clothes, boots and motorcycles.

    5) The emergence of ISIS related terrorism in Europe over the last couple of years really hasn't done the Syrian plight any favours.

    6) It's gone on for 5 years or so now and turned into a stalemate, people are just bored with the whole thing now. It's not NEWs anymore.

    7) It's not like a movie where there are good guys and bad guys, all the sides seem to be bad guys. What kind of plot is that?

    8) Brexit :P
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    The choice isn't about moving; the choice is about them (as a people) implementing a sensible system of government and not acquiescing or conniving in an Islamist, tribal or nationalist one - just as the British and other Europeans did.

    They aren't heading for that now, and don't appear to want it, just like all the other countries that wasted the effort of going through the so-called Arab Spring. They want to live under Islam, or a tribal government. But they have to live with the consequences of making that choice. One of those consequences is that they are anathema to westerners who do not wish to import similar instability when their choices result in disaster.
    Clearly that is what the rebels were trying to do (implementing a sensible government), and look what happened. Its not Islamist or tribal regimes, its dictators who want to retain power. And now its a 5- way proxy war with no hope of dissolution.
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    Not really our problem, if only the refugees were the children and not 20 something year old men who should be fighting for their country instead of climbing over fences disturbing our trade. If missiles quicken the end of the Syria Civil War then I believe a few civilian casualties are worth it instead of a massacred population which would kill many more than our missiles do.Name:  untitled.png
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    I care, but it's almost impossible for the common person in the UK to help at all. We can protest, but the government probably won't listen because of the fear of terrorism than runs deep within society.
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    (Original post by NigelOfDemocracy)
    beacuse they are not a concern of the british government, a british government should be concerned with the WELFARE (state) of the british people not some foreigners who have done nothing for britain since we enlsaved them last time.
    the sooner the world works together to help humanity the better
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    (Original post by Yoloinator)
    Not really our problem, if only the refugees were the children and not 20 something year old men who should be fighting for their country instead of climbing over fences disturbing our trade. If missiles quicken the end of the Syria Civil War then I believe a few civilian casualties are worth it instead of a massacred population which would kill many more than our missiles do.
    Which country should they fight for?
    You can't fight for your country if it's a civil war
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    (Original post by Eulers_)
    Clearly that is what the rebels were trying to do (implementing a sensible government),
    Well, no. Not a single faction unequivocally seeks democracy within the current boundaries. They seek Islamist states (most groups), continued dictatorship (the government), hegemony by Saudi Arabia (several groups), break-up of Syria (Kurds and others), or federalism (more Kurds and others).
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    Asked and answered. Next.
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    (Original post by TheGreatPumpkin)
    Which country should they fight for?
    You can't fight for your country if it's a civil war
    I don't care what faction those cowards fight for, in English civil war everyone picked a side. Matilda or Stephen, York or Lancastrian, Royalist or Roundhead. This is an internal issue and we are backing a certain rebel group and the kurds and the free Syria army. Why don't they join their national army, same goes in Iraq as well. Most are cowards. When the Poles fled Poland they need not ask for social services when they arrived but they fought to free their homeland. I say train them then send them back. Only the weak, the old, the children and the women should be granted asylum. The men should fight for their country's freedom just as our ancestors have.Name:  untitled.png
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    Some people are insanely desensitised to all of it, some only get concerned when it's something that affects them or could affect them in the future while some view Syrians as "others", therefore the loss of life there isn't worth getting outraged over.

    I have been following the conflict for quite a while now and have to admit that I have also become desensitised over the past couple of years, but I'm working on it. That's because it isn't OK that people are being killed on a mass scale, it should not be accepted as the norm. The international community needs to call Assad, Putin and all of the leaders responsible for this bloodshed to account for their actions. Dropping bombs is not going to solve a humanitarian crisis.
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    (Original post by WBZ144)
    Some people are insanely desensitised to all of it, some only get concerned when it's something that affects them or could affect them in the future while some view Syrians as "others", therefore the loss of life there isn't worth getting outraged over.

    I have been following the conflict for quite a while now and have to admit that I have also become desensitised over the past couple of years, but I'm working on it. That's because it isn't OK that people are being killed on a mass scale, it should not be accepted as the norm. The international community needs to call Assad, Putin and all of the leaders responsible for this bloodshed to account for their actions. Dropping bombs is not going to solve a humanitarian crisis.
    Now when you say we should hold them responsible, what do you think we should do? Arrest the last leader of Syria who is keeping that state together by the strings, he may be killing rebels with innocents in the aftermath but it beats pure anarchy. And you mention Putin, are we going to arrest the leader of a global power as well. tad bit optimistic or delusional. They won't prosecuted because it's a case of drop some bombs that kill a number of civilians or turn our eyes whilst Daesh take over Syria and slaughter every man, woman and child that disagrees with them. Now when I consider these 2 alternatives it is with a sorrow heart that I say keep the missiles going in.Name:  untitled.png
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    No. Moslem. My spelling was around in English (which is the language we are using here) long before yours was. Would you prefer me to use Mussulman or Mohammedan?



    I didn't say they are. I said that their governments are. However, they collectively consider democracy, the very bedrock of European civilisation in the 21st century, to be anathema to them and so produce extreme (to us) nationalist and Islamist governments.

    In fact, they use democracy, when they have it, to elect Islamists or nationalist factions and thus dispose of democracy. This often leads (pace Egypt when the Islamists were elected) to a coup or other undemocratic intervention to replace one extreme government with another - though both are undemocratic and autocratic.

    If they use democracy in that way it would be dangerous to allow them into a democratic Europe while they have these characteristics.
    Mate it's called Muslim not "Moslem". No one says Moslem anymore. Why you trying to be weird?
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    Since people die in Syria every day from bombs and whatever the news coming from there gets boring if it's repeated on the news everyday. People want to know about interesting things on the news and people just don't find Syria that interesting anymore. Other issues, like the US debate, receive more coverage because people tend to be more interested in them than some random war in the Middle East.
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    Psychological distance unfortunately
 
 
 
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