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Should prisons be reformed Watch

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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    You still haven't given your side of the coin? Why do you think the aforementioned offences are worthy of death?
    society would benefit from their departure *
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    (Original post by the bear)
    society would benefit from their departure *
    Okay, yeah, but there are less violent ways of achieving that without getting the cyanide injections out.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Okay, yeah, but there are less violent ways of achieving that without getting the cyanide injections out.
    the crime community would soon change their tune once the tumbrils started to roll...
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    (Original post by MemeworksStudios)
    100% of criminals executed never reoffend.
    100% of dead people never commit a crime in the first place...
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    (Original post by the bear)
    the crime community would soon change their tune once the tumbrils started to roll...
    Your opinion is not backed up by fact, I'm afraid

    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/file...eStudy2009.pdf

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ter-criminals/

    There is no hard evidence that the presence of the death penalty actually deters crime and this is an opinion shared by most top criminologists.
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Your opinion is not backed up by fact, I'm afraid

    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/file...eStudy2009.pdf

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ter-criminals/

    There is no hard evidence that the presence of the death penalty actually deters crime and this is an opinion shared by most top criminologists.
    if my plan were implemented for crimes such as burglary & drug dealing the incidence would plummet. *
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    (Original post by the bear)
    if my plan were implemented for crimes such as burglary & drug dealing the incidence would plummet. *
    What is your plan? :confused:
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    What is your plan? :confused:
    instead of giving them a few months or at most a couple of years in a comfy jail with their pals they would be executed. *
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    (Original post by the bear)
    instead of giving them a few months or at most a couple of years in a comfy jail with their pals they would be executed. *
    Prison isn't like that though, it's full of violence, gangs and drugs. Hardly what you'd call comfortable
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Prison isn't like that though, it's full of violence, gangs and drugs. Hardly what you'd call comfortable
    once my plan is implemented the drugs will be far less of a problem. *
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    (Original post by the bear)
    once my plan is implemented the drugs will be far less of a problem. *
    Okay, well, you're entitled to your own opinion but the facts as they stand don't make a great case for the death penalty (even though I support it for different reasons for murderers, paedophiles, rapists and terrorists)
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Okay, well, you're entitled to your own opinion but the facts as they stand don't make a great case for the death penalty (even though I support it for different reasons for murderers, paedophiles, rapists and terrorists)
    it can help across the whole spectrum of scumminess *
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    (Original post by the bear)
    it can help across the whole spectrum of scumminess *
    Well... Except for the fact that there's hard evidence that is doesn't and in some cases is even associated with increased murder rates, but whatever, we'll just both ignore that I guess?

    In any case I hope you enjoy the rest of your day, Bear
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    (Original post by AngryRedhead)
    Well... Except for the fact that there's hard evidence that is doesn't and in some cases is even associated with increased murder rates, but whatever, we'll just both ignore that I guess?

    In any case I hope you enjoy the rest of your day, Bear
    be careful out there, it's a jungle *
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    (Original post by sek510i)
    I apologise if it sounded like I was blaming prison staff as a whole for the problems in the justice system, that wasn't my intention at all.
    Certainly, I agree that each prisoner is different and longer sentences wouldn't be a solution for everybody. I just don't see the point in spending money on sending somebody to prison if it's unlikely to have an effect on their behaviour.

    Do you think that they should let psychologists have more influence in the initial sentencing instead, and try to find alternatives that would suit the prisoner?
    Yes I do. Not solely just the psychologists influence, however of course.


    If you had a minor offence made by a young adult (without going into too much detail - offending usually start young, it is rarer to find offending starting at 50 years old for example), the justice system would do their bit and it would be classed as punishment. Now if we brought a psychologist into things, they would asses everything. They really do assess a lot. They should identify factors which have been known to cause offending , factors which support offending, factors which have know to dilute offending etc. They then can build a plan, which is very specific to each offender, and targets each of the factors. So maybe this young adult is committing crimes for financial purposes, if so, the psychologist may suggest (on top of other programmes) extra support (in the community or prison setting), for writing CVs, extra experience, job searching etc.

    I wouldn't say alternatives to prison, but psychologists could plan out what they do whilst there.I just think that offending is a behaviour, and psychologists are supposedly the key individuals in understanding behaviour and therefore should have more of a role when we want to alter behaviour of offenders.
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    (Original post by natalie427)
    Yes I do. Not solely just the psychologists influence, however of course.


    If you had a minor offence made by a young adult (without going into too much detail - offending usually start young, it is rarer to find offending starting at 50 years old for example), the justice system would do their bit and it would be classed as punishment. Now if we brought a psychologist into things, they would asses everything. They really do assess a lot. They should identify factors which have been known to cause offending , factors which support offending, factors which have know to dilute offending etc. They then can build a plan, which is very specific to each offender, and targets each of the factors. So maybe this young adult is committing crimes for financial purposes, if so, the psychologist may suggest (on top of other programmes) extra support (in the community or prison setting), for writing CVs, extra experience, job searching etc.

    I wouldn't say alternatives to prison, but psychologists could plan out what they do whilst there.I just think that offending is a behaviour, and psychologists are supposedly the key individuals in understanding behaviour and therefore should have more of a role when we want to alter behaviour of offenders.
    That would all make sense. I think that the problems that would arise with that are largely financial (not that that makes it a bad plan, at all).

    The key would probably be finding a way to persuade the government that it was cheaper to get a psychologist to run all of these assessments and therefore reduce reoffending than it would be to run the legal system they way that they do at the moment.
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    (Original post by sek510i)
    That would all make sense. I think that the problems that would arise with that are largely financial (not that that makes it a bad plan, at all).

    The key would probably be finding a way to persuade the government that it was cheaper to get a psychologist to run all of these assessments and therefore reduce reoffending than it would be to run the legal system they way that they do at the moment.
    Yep, all boils down to finance. But it would also provide more psychology-based jobs for the increasing number of psychology graduates.
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    (Original post by natalie427)
    Yep, all boils down to finance. But it would also provide more psychology-based jobs for the increasing number of psychology graduates.
    I'm afraid I've lost Theresa May's email address, so somebody else is going to have to send her a link to this thread
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    (Original post by mojojojo101)
    100% of dead people never commit a crime in the first place...
    Good point :sly: We should implement and preemptive death penalty in some cases.
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    We need the death penalty, that's how we will progress forward.
 
 
 
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