Any other summer 2016 uni graduates still unemployed?

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    (Original post by Boreism)
    If you can't drive, you may get a bus if possible. If you did have car they would reimburse the petrol. Been there and done it. If nothing works then you can just apply for JSA but they would tell you the same thing they would place you on volunteer work anyway. I used to work at the Jobcentre and this was (and still is) the type of advice I was told to give.

    Obviously don't just apply to 2 places, you need to make more than that!
    Just keep applying to anything not just in one field.

    You do not need to make snotty comments, I am only trying to help. Of course with that kind of attitude you may not get anywhere in life, especially employment.
    I'm volunteering at the moment and they only pay half my travel. I too come from a small town and there are little opportunities in what I want to do - I'm lucky enough to be able to commute to London but it will set me back around £600 for my volunteering period to gain experience in the sector (even with half of it reimbursed by the organisation). I'm very lucky to be able to do so. My sister previously worked in a charity shop and was not paid expenses. I tried to work at the weekends to make up the travel costs, but am having to reduce this since it's too overwhelming to be working 6 days a week, commuting 3 hours a day, and still trying to apply to as many jobs as you can in the evenings.

    Many people have good experience but still struggle to find a job - with so many people applying, it can come down to luck a lot of the time. I don't doubt that everyone on this thread is trying, but a lot of time responses tend to be very judging rather than give practical advice. I don't think this poster is being snotty at all - it's frustrating when you've been making countless applications, and someone tells you the only reason you haven't succeeded is because you're not trying hard enough. I wish people on here would ask more about the poster's relevant experience and skills before making judgements on what they can do next. It's not easy to relocate, especially for many entry level/dead end/barely above minimum wage jobs which you're recommending as an option.
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    (Original post by roflcakes1)
    I'm volunteering at the moment and they only pay half my travel. I too come from a small town and there are little opportunities in what I want to do - I'm lucky enough to be able to commute to London but it will set me back around £600 for my volunteering period to gain experience in the sector (even with half of it reimbursed by the organisation). I'm very lucky to be able to do so. My sister previously worked in a charity shop and was not paid expenses. I tried to work at the weekends to make up the travel costs, but am having to reduce this since it's too overwhelming to be working 6 days a week, commuting 3 hours a day, and still trying to apply to as many jobs as you can in the evenings.

    Many people have good experience but still struggle to find a job - with so many people applying, it can come down to luck a lot of the time. I don't doubt that everyone on this thread is trying, but a lot of time responses tend to be very judging rather than give practical advice. I don't think this poster is being snotty at all - it's frustrating when you've been making countless applications, and someone tells you the only reason you haven't succeeded is because you're not trying hard enough. I wish people on here would ask more about the poster's relevant experience and skills before making judgements on what they can do next. It's not easy to relocate, especially for many entry level/dead end/barely above minimum wage jobs which you're recommending as an option.
    But what I am saying is if you do get a job albeit in a warehouse or restaurant thats a good thing because at least you can say you finally have a job; beggars can't be choosers really. I known quite a few grads who went down this route and they don't have a decency of gratitude or appreciation of their own situation. I do know some other half of grads who still cannot go down this route of national minimum wage jobs because their expectations are too high.
    I have a snobby sister who thinks that everything in this world is easy, but she's older than me and has more experience so of course she would be saying that, and so does my parents even the mother thinks you can still walk into a job just in an instant click. It's not like the old days when you can just literally walk into a job.
    I've done volunteering once in my life for a 2 week stint and have been in paid employment since then.

    Obviously I'm not saying everything is easy myself but you will never know you would enjoy something not unless you try it out first. I've seen these types of people day in and day out (I work in the world of recruitment) and their attitude towards work is negatively incredible.

    'I don't want to do this job because its going to be boring for me' (wheat even though, you haven't got experience in this job?) How would these people know if they don't even bother trying?
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    (Original post by J-SP)
    Not all graduate programmes have a UCAS point requirement. In fact a minority use a UCAS points requirement (less than 27%).



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    (Original post by Boreism)
    You obviously don't know anything about volunteering do you? It doesn't cost you anything, all of your travel expenses will be reimbursed to you at the end of the day.

    Well rural areas usually mean there aren't enough jobs around (if you live in the countryside). I have university friends who moved to more urban areas because they know employment opportunities are limited. Can't you relocate? Apply for jobs in urban areas first then if they want to offer you the job just rent a place somewhere.
    Some places may only start to reimburse you after an initial probationary period.

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    I never got a degree and haven't been out of work since leaving school. Currently work in a law firm.*

    Degrees don't mean as much as people think.*
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Source?

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    Association of Graduate Recruiters survey 2016.


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    (Original post by Boreism)
    If you can't drive, you may get a bus if possible. If you did have car they would reimburse the petrol. Been there and done it. If nothing works then you can just apply for JSA but they would tell you the same thing they would place you on volunteer work anyway. I used to work at the Jobcentre and this was (and still is) the type of advice I was told to give.

    Obviously don't just apply to 2 places, you need to make more than that!
    Just keep applying to anything not just in one field.

    You do not need to make snotty comments, I am only trying to help. Of course with that kind of attitude you may not get anywhere in life, especially employment.
    Get over your sanctimonious self. Doesn't surprise me at all that you're a former JobCentre employee.

    If you didn't expect "snotty" comments then don't make narrow-minded assumptions that I'm an entitled graduate who is only applying for grad schemes and nothing else.

    Re-read this thread and point out to me where I specified the types of jobs that I am applying for? I've been applying to all levels of job and anywhere constantly for months. Forgive me if I therefore don't take too kindly to people making out that I'm simply not making an effort.
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    I worked in many fields before going to uni some being, retail, security. I know where I want to go with my career so I will be sticking to jobs in that field area, as I done the work elsewhere before and not just any job going to do.


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    (Original post by Boreism)
    Hence why graduates need to look ahead and plan what they need to do rather than just being a couch potato complaining they haven't found a ('dream' job.
    Sitting at home all day won't solve that problem.
    And when you inevitably come back say that you weren't making assumptions and that you are just trying to help, please remember that this was only your second comment in this thread.

    But you know, "snotty" comments are bad and all that.
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    Well you may be making an effort, but obviously not enough of one. You need to take a look at yourself and determine why you are not good enough for the jobs you have been applying for, and look to rectify it immediately.
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    (Original post by #ChaosKass)
    Well you may be making an effort, but obviously not enough of one. You need to take a look at yourself and determine why you are not good enough for the jobs you have been applying for, and look to rectify it immediately.
    I'm sorry but there comes a point after months of 9-6 pm applications, CV and application checks, previous experience etc where people need to ditch the rhetoric of "Oh this person must not be trying hard enough" and start to blame it more on the state of society and the job market. I'm doing enough and doing anymore would sacrifice my already fragile mental health.

    There aren't enough steady full-time minimum wage jobs that pay enough for everyone to get by independently. The UK is flooded with zero-hour contract and agency work which doesn't pay enough or guarantee enough shifts for a human being to live on. The whole purpose of a job is to fund your existence so what's the point in working a job that doesn't let you do that? I'm not entitled, that's just common sense.

    I'm not owed a job and I know it's no one else's fault that I can't get one. But if society is such nowadays that I'm expected to fund my existence off of one shift a week at a local factory earning minimum wage then what's the point in living at all?
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    (Original post by LiquidCryztal)
    I'm sorry but there comes a point after months of 9-6 pm applications, CV and application checks, previous experience etc where people need to ditch the rhetoric of "Oh this person must not be trying hard enough" and start to blame it more on the state of society and the job market. I'm doing enough and doing anymore would sacrifice my already fragile mental health.

    There aren't enough steady full-time minimum wage jobs that pay enough for everyone to get by independently. The UK is flooded with zero-hour contract and agency work which doesn't pay enough or guarantee enough shifts for a human being to live on. The whole purpose of a job is to fund your existence so what's the point in working a job that doesn't let you do that? I'm not entitled, that's just common sense.

    I'm not owed a job and I know it's no one else's fault that I can't get one. But if society is such nowadays that I'm expected to fund my existence off of one shift a week at a local factory earning minimum wage then what's the point in living at all?
    I'm afraid I have to agree with Chaos Kass that you have to keep looking to improve, there is always something you can be doing better and blaming others doesn't get you anywhere. I spent 11 months job hunting so I know how hard it can be, I found writing a cover letter to be very exhausting and the first couple of post interview rejections very tough mentally. But each time a cover letter didn't get me an interview I reviewed it. Where I did get an interview and didn't get the role, I asked for feedback beyond just the 'we hired someone with more experience' and I got detailed experience which related directly to my peformance at interview, highlighting the specific answers I didn't do well in. I soon came to realise that I could get the role I wanted, I just had to get my cover letter and every interview answer spot on and the ball was entirely in my court in that one. I also took advantage of interview help services I had access to, if there are any you can go to then I'd strongly advise you utilise them. Your old uni careers dept should still be able to help you too.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I'm afraid I have to agree with Chaos Kass that you have to keep looking to improve, there is always something you can be doing better and blaming others doesn't get you anywhere. I spent 11 months job hunting so I know how hard it can be, I found writing a cover letter to be very exhausting and the first couple of post interview rejections very tough mentally. But each time a cover letter didn't get me an interview I reviewed it. Where I did get an interview and didn't get the role, I asked for feedback beyond just the 'we hired someone with more experience' and I got detailed experience which related directly to my peformance at interview, highlighting the specific answers I didn't do well in. I soon came to realise that I could get the role I wanted, I just had to get my cover letter and every interview answer spot on and the ball was entirely in my court in that one. I also took advantage of interview help services I had access to, if there are any you can go to then I'd strongly advise you utilise them. Your old uni careers dept should still be able to help you too.
    I'm doing all of those things and I'm happy to keep doing them. I'm sure something will come eventually and I haven't been going for 11 months yet.

    Mentally though, there is a limit to the amount I can do before I start to question the benefits of existence.

    It just annoys me when the attitude is to make out that people in my situation are lazy or not trying like JobCentre exployee who posted above.
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    (Original post by LiquidCryztal)
    I'm doing all of those things and I'm happy to keep doing them. I'm sure something will come eventually and I haven't been going for 11 months yet.

    Mentally though, there is a limit to the amount I can do before I start to question the benefits of existence.

    It just annoys me when the attitude is to make out that people in my situation are lazy or not trying like JobCentre exployee who posted above.
    It is not just 'people like me'; its employers too. They don't want to think you have just been sitting there waiting for something to happen in your life.
    There are another group of people who genuinely don't even want work and they use European workers and other ethnic groups like me as a scapegoat to blame them for their 'problems.' I've seen it during my stint at the JC. Also look at the Brexit effect.

    Trust me you have no idea what its like working there. You work for almost nothing because most of the wages go to people who don't want work.

    Once you do get that interview I will bet you that the interviewer is likely going to ask 'What have you been doing since you have graduated?'
    Trust me, graduates will tell you the same thing in their interview experiences

    I am sorry if I have offended you in any way with my posts; I don't actually intend to but just to say that there are benefits to gaining work experience just get your foot in the door.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    Trust me you have no idea what its like working there. You work for almost nothing because most of the wages go to people who don't want work.
    You are aware that the benefit claimants are not paid out of Job Centre Plus employees' salaries, right?
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    (Original post by Herz)
    You are aware that the benefit claimants are not paid out of Job Centre Plus employees' salaries, right?
    But I was a temporary worker there so therefore I was paid by the agency. You are aware that most people pay tax when they work right - and do you know where most, if not some of that tax goes to?
    This is why those who do work are complaining about the system.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    But I was a temporary worker there so therefore I was paid by the agency. You are aware that most people pay tax when they work right - and do you know where some if not most of that tax goes to?
    Pensions.

    Other forms of welfare form a very small part of the overall bill in comparison.

    Keep reading the Daily Mail and spouting ignorant rhetoric though friend, you're a good little drone.
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    (Original post by Herz)
    Pensions.

    Other forms of welfare form a very small part of the overall bill in comparison.

    Keep reading the Daily Mail and spouting ignorant rhetoric though friend, you're a good little drone.
    You didn't read my post did you? I never said all of the tax goes to welfare because it obviously to other services and whatnot, but was just pointing out it isn't just me thats complaining.
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    (Original post by Boreism)
    But I was a temporary worker there so therefore I was paid by the agency. You are aware that most people pay tax when they work right - and do you know where most, if not some of that tax goes to?
    This is why those who do work are complaining about the system.
    Erm the biggest recipients of welfare are pensioners and a tiny bit goes to JSA and other things so stop your attack on poor people. And instead of attacking people who can't get jobs because full time jobs are rare why don't you direct your anger towards tax evading companies

    This pie chart shows the small percentage of money that is paid to JSA

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/...65_634x375.jpg
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    (Original post by Jee1)
    Erm the biggest recipients of welfare are pensioners and a tiny bit goes to JSA and other things so stop your attack on poor people. And instead of attacking people who can't get jobs because full time jobs are rare why don't you direct your anger towards tax evading companies

    This pie chart shows the small percentage of money that is paid to JSA

    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2014/...65_634x375.jpg
    Why should I give my hard earn money to those people who don't even want work, but would rather sit on a couch all day and don't have to do a thing to earn it?

    If these full time jobs are as you say 'rare', how come most of my jobs that I worked in were full time? Was it because I 'stole' those positions because of my ethnic race? Of course not. That is just utter nonsense. I have the skills and experience required. Not because I live locally and a British citizen. Although being a British citizen is important for right to work it doesn't technically bring money to the business does it?

    Can you tell me how I can steal a job? I don't see someone's name on it.
 
 
 
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