Are jeans ever acceptable? (interview question)

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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    God no, you'd be better off with well-fitting jeans than a cheap and nasty suit!

    In answer - jeans are never appropriate for an interview, no matter how dark. Normal business attire would be a lounge suit in a sober colour (dark navy or charcoal (not black or strong blue or any other colours), a good-quality shirt in white (preferably) or blue in either a plain weave or herringbone, a tie in a plain or geometric pattern with black derby or brogue shoes. This is city attire, but works for any interview where you want to come across as serious. If you're a bit short of cash, second-hand quality garments that fit well are much better than some nasty cheap suits/trousers from the High Street.
    Do you feel for a hospitality job such smartness is necessary? In the skype interviews so far they've been in shorts and t-shirt, and I've been in a smart woolen jumper, but I guess this probably won't transfer to reality.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Do you feel for a hospitality job such smartness is necessary? In the skype interviews so far they've been in shorts and t-shirt, and I've been in a smart woolen jumper, but I guess this probably won't transfer to reality.
    That's why I made the point that what I was outlining was city attire - of course it would be appropriate to tweak it for this job but the basics remain the same - and it's always better to be overdressed than underdressed. In my opinion and experience, certain things are never appropriate, and jeans are one of them.
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    (Original post by Reality Check)
    God no, you'd be better off with well-fitting jeans than a cheap and nasty suit!
    Cheap suits can look good and fit well. My suit is from Tesco, I've worn it loads of times and got compliments on it (and indeed have worn it to competitive academic interviews). I can assure you it is much more suitable for an interview than a pair of jeans. :p:
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    I have to say I was hoping I could get away with it. I got funded PhD offers from Russel Group unis in jeans, but I guess "proper jobs" are a bit different. I can't rely on being a genius to get a chalet job.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    I have to say I was hoping I could get away with it. I got funded PhD offers from Russel Group unis in jeans, but I guess "proper jobs" are a bit different. I can't rely on being a genius to get a chalet job.
    I got a job wearing jeans. But they were good quality ones mind. Jeans are better than chinos without a doubt!

    But as I said it depends on if you are wearing smart jeans, or just lousy ones. That is my opinion anyway!
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    Always wear a suit to job interviews, no matter how weird or out of place it looks. If not a full suit, then at least, trousers - shirt - tie (if no tie, then the suit jacket) - shoes. Make sure to take your CV in with you and a pen and some paper - it's a two way conversation.

    Once you get the job, wear whatever you're allowed to.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Make sure to take your CV in with you
    By all means have your CV in your briefcase, just in case one of the interviewers does not have a copy. But never, never, never clutch it in your hand or refer to it. 99% of all TSR members should have a one page CV and a short career; there is no excuse for not being completely on top of the limited information it contains.

    Having to refer to your CV makes you look as if you have to check which lies you are telling in it.
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    (Original post by zKlown)
    No

    Never wear jeans to an interview, no matter the job.

    Always go dressed as smart as possible, it shows effort.

    This isn't quite appropriate. It works for a lot of main stream jobs but there are going to be a number of times when jeans are appropriate.

    I personally remember a hiring manager for a group of programmers saying that if you turned up to an interview in a suit you'd have already hurt your chances. They'd never expect you to sit there programming in a suit, something casual like jeans and a shirt is more acceptable.

    I'm not saying you should always wear jeans to programming interviews but it's important to be aware of what you are applying to and dress appropriately. Wearing a suit to an interview when the dress code is smart casual shows you haven't paid attention to what they're asking of you. In these scenarios a pair of smart jeans would be perfectly acceptable.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Why's everyone having such a hissy about jeans and brown shoes? Brown shoes are the common accepted colour when worn with grey.

    The interviews will literally be across the county where I'll be looking to spend the day so proper dress shoes just won't work, I'm not going to destroy the sole on a £100 pair of shoes if I can help it. My worry is if I go for smart trousers I'll need smart shoes, and I know it sounds stupid but cheap shoes genuinely don't fit me (I have incredibly narrow feet, and normally the narrower shoes are the more expensive/italian brands) and by this point we're up to more than I can afford, especially if I don't get the job.

    Would a cheap pair of chinos be more acceptable than jeans, with the rest of the outfit as before?
    Are you going to walk across the country? I'm guessing not, so please wear yor smart shoes. £100 is not very expensive for shoes, my flip flops are twice that amount.
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    (Original post by Lemon Haze)
    Are you going to walk across the country? I'm guessing not, so please wear yor smart shoes. £100 is not very expensive for shoes, my flip flops are twice that amount.
    Well ain't that nice for you. I personally don't want to purposefully destroy a nice pair of shoes.
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    (Original post by Final Fantasy)
    Always wear a suit to job interviews, no matter how weird or out of place it looks. If not a full suit, then at least, trousers - shirt - tie (if no tie, then the suit jacket) - shoes. Make sure to take your CV in with you and a pen and some paper - it's a two way conversation.

    Once you get the job, wear whatever you're allowed to.
    I have to admit I am slightly puzzled by the notion of always. I've been to group interviews for jobs where 95% of the people there weren't in suits. The 2 that were went out in the first round.

    What about specific to the job of being a chalet host; do you think a suit is needed.
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    I've done 5 seasons worth of work in the ski industry, for every job interview I wore a suit. I've worked for ski schools, high end chalets, the lot.

    If your smart shoes can't handle walking for a day then god knows what they are or where you got them, but they sound utterly unfit for purpose. Either way, get yourself to primark and get a pair for £15. Same with smart trousers. You're going to need them again later in life anyway, so you can consider investing. Even £35 at Next will get a good pair of shoes that will last years if you look after them.

    Ok, probably don't need a suit, but why sell yourself short?
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    I've done 5 seasons worth of work in the ski industry, for every job interview I wore a suit. I've worked for ski schools, high end chalets, the lot.

    If your smart shoes can't handle walking for a day then god knows what they are or where you got them, but they sound utterly unfit for purpose. Either way, get yourself to primark and get a pair for £15. Same with smart trousers. You're going to need them again later in life anyway, so you can consider investing. Even £35 at Next will get a good pair of shoes that will last years if you look after them.

    Ok, probably don't need a suit, but why sell yourself short?
    As mentioned, unfortunately cheap shoes really just don't fit me. I have such slim feet that it's hard to find any shoes that fit me tbh, but those that do are normally italian and not cheap. The shoes I have are fit for the purpose I bought them, and will be equally fit for working at the chalet if I get the job.

    Smart trousers I have from my various evening suits, but they don't really go with anything else, unless I just wear them, a shirt and my overcoat. Still have the issue with shoes I own that will work with that outfit though.

    Thanks for the insight into what you've worn in the past though. Did you just have one interview for these positions?
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    As mentioned, unfortunately cheap shoes really just don't fit me. I have such slim feet that it's hard to find any shoes that fit me tbh, but those that do are normally italian and not cheap. The shoes I have are fit for the purpose I bought them, and will be equally fit for working at the chalet if I get the job.

    Smart trousers I have from my various evening suits, but they don't really go with anything else, unless I just wear them, a shirt and my overcoat. Still have the issue with shoes I own that will work with that outfit though.

    Thanks for the insight into what you've worn in the past though. Did you just have one interview for these positions?
    If your feet are so slim then how do you get ski / board boots to fit?

    And I can assure you that there chalets you'll be in - and living quarters especially - will not have carpets, so if your shoes are likely to get damaged by a bit of walking here then 4 months (at least) on hard chalet floors is going knacker them completely. If walking on those floors for 4 months isn't going to knacker them, then neither is spending a day or two walking between interviews...

    Smart trousers go with anything. Just wear shirt and tie if you're that anal about things.

    Does sound like you're making a colossal mountain out of a molehill here.


    Usually 2. Phone/skype interview and then in person. Not so much with the second one for non-British companies.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    If your feet are so slim then how do you get ski / board boots to fit?

    And I can assure you that there chalets you'll be in - and living quarters especially - will not have carpets, so if your shoes are likely to get damaged by a bit of walking here then 4 months (at least) on hard chalet floors is going knacker them completely. If walking on those floors for 4 months isn't going to knacker them, then neither is spending a day or two walking between interviews...

    Smart trousers go with anything. Just wear shirt and tie if you're that anal about things.

    Does sound like you're making a colossal mountain out of a molehill here.


    Usually 2. Phone/skype interview and then in person. Not so much with the second one for non-British companies.
    Wooden floors my shoes are fine with, it's walking on gravel/tarmac outside that ruined the last pair, don't want the same to happen again. Like I say, I can just wear my trousers with shirt and overcoat, but stuck for shoes to go with it.

    And I have custom ski boots.

    I'm not intentionally making a mountain out of anything, I just want to give myself the best chance possible and have ended up rather defensive because I wasn't expecting such aggression in a thread with such a simple question.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    Wooden floors my shoes are fine with, it's walking on gravel/tarmac outside that ruined the last pair, don't want the same to happen again. Like I say, I can just wear my trousers with shirt and overcoat, but stuck for shoes to go with it.

    And I have custom ski boots.

    I'm not intentionally making a mountain out of anything, I just want to give myself the best chance possible and have ended up rather defensive because I wasn't expecting such aggression in a thread with such a simple question.
    The floors in the chalet, especially at ground level, are likely to be concrete. We won't even go into the effect of cold and ice...

    Well. It's obvious then. If you want the best possible chance, go smart. No brainer.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    The floors in the chalet, especially at ground level, are likely to be concrete. We won't even go into the effect of cold and ice...

    Well. It's obvious then. If you want the best possible chance, go smart. No brainer.
    I've already had a couple of interviews with them. It's wood or carpet throughout (even the boot room) and I'd never have to be outside in uniform.

    I want the best chance possible bearing in mind what I have and how limited my budget is. Sorry, I thought that was clear.
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    (Original post by Dheorl)
    I've already had a couple of interviews with them. It's wood or carpet throughout (even the boot room) and I'd never have to be outside in uniform.

    I want the best chance possible bearing in mind what I have and how limited my budget is. Sorry, I thought that was clear.
    Out of curiosity, which company?
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    Out of curiosity, which company?
    For, probably over paranoid reasons, I'd rather not say until I've either got it or have been turned down.
 
 
 
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